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Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities
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Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities

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What is a “Road Diet” , Livability Evaluation and Case Studies …

What is a “Road Diet” , Livability Evaluation and Case Studies

Published in: Economy & Finance, Business
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  • 1. Applying the Road Diet for Livable Communities Jennifer A. Rosales, P.E. Lead Transportation Engineer Professional Associate Presentation to ITE International Annual Meeting August 9, 2005
  • 2. Overview • What is a “Road Diet” • Livability Evaluation • Case Studies • Conclusions
  • 3. “Road Diet” Concept • Lane Reduction • Four-to-two lane conversion – Accommodates existing and future travel without widening • Benefits to all modes of transportation
  • 4. “Road Diet” Concept Safety benefits – Reduced vehicle speeds – Reduced collisions and injuries – Reduced conflict points – Improved sight distance
  • 5. “Road Diet” Concept Benefits to all users – Improved mobility and access – Improved livability and quality of life – Economic and community goals
  • 6. “Road Diet” Case Studies • Vancouver, Washington • Toronto, Canada • Clear Lake, Iowa • Duniden, New Zealand • Athens, Georgia
  • 7. Livability Survey • Purpose – examine livability impacts • Survey modeled from Livable Streets – Street perceptions including traffic, safety, comfort – Street life activities – Recommended Improvements – Reactions to Road Diet • Survey medium varied
  • 8. “Road Diet” Case Studies Fourth Plain Boulevard in Vancouver, Washington – Arterial ~ 17,000 ADT – Re-striping project in 2002 – Bike lanes – ADA ramps & utilities – Improved safety, mobility and access for all users Photo credits: Todd Boulanger, COV
  • 9. “Road Diet” Case Studies Fourth Plain Boulevard in Vancouver, Washington – Crashes 52 % – Traffic speeds 18 % – No traffic diversion – Pedestrian & bike benefits – Redevelopment and renovations – Measured economic growth – Easier to cross street – Street “feels” safer – 67% Yes, 21% Maybe, 12% No Photo credits: Todd Boulanger, COV
  • 10. “Road Diet” Case Studies Baxter Street in Athens, Georgia – Arterial ~ ADT 20,000 – Safety Demonstration Project in 1999 – Re-striping – Bike lanes Photo credits: David Clark, Athens-Clarke County, GA
  • 11. “Road Diet” Case Studies Baxter Street in Athens, Georgia – Overall crashes 53 % and at unsignalized locations 60% – Traffic Diversion ~ 4% – Easier to cross street – Slower speeds – Home and business improvements – Perceived number of lanes and street width is "just right" – 47% Yes, 33% Maybe, 20% No Photo credits: David Clark, Athens-Clarke County, GA
  • 12. “Road Diet” Case Studies Kaikorai Valley Road in Dunedin, New Zealand – Arterial ~ 10,000 ADT – 4 to 2 lanes with CTL/median – 2003 conversion – Cycle lanes and landscaping – Improved safety, mobility and access for all users Photo credits: Ron Minnema, Traffic Engineer, Dunedin City Council
  • 13. “Road Diet” Case Studies Kaikorai Valley Road in Dunedin, New Zealand – Crashes 30 % – Pedestrians and bicyclists – No traffic diversion – Perceived # of lanes and street width "just right" – Home and business improvements – 42% Yes, 31% Maybe, 27% No Photo credits: Ron Minnema, Traffic Engineer, Dunedin City Council
  • 14. “Road Diet” Case Studies US 18 in Clear Lake, Iowa – State Highway ~ 12,000 ADT – Re-striping project in 2003 – 4 to 2 lanes with CTL – Extra width – shoulders – Highway through town
  • 15. “Road Diet” Case Studies US 18 in Clear Lake, Iowa – Crashes 65 % – Aggressive speeding 52% – Adequate traffic operation & good mobility – Mixed perceptions - striping confusing – Livability benefits still to be realized
  • 16. “Road Diet” Case Studies St. George Street in Toronto, Canada – Minor Arterial ~ ADT 7,500 – Through University campus – Two project phases ’93 & ‘96 – Cycle lanes, on-street parking, wider sidewalks, urban landscaping – Alternate paving materials
  • 17. “Road Diet” Case Studies St. George Street in Toronto, Canada – Crashes 40 % – Pedestrians and bicycles – No traffic diversion – Easier to cross street – Perceived slower speeds, "feels safer,” perceived increase in pedestrians and bicyclists – 81% Yes, 12% Maybe, 6% No
  • 18. Handbook for Livable Streets: Setting Trends by Applying the Road Diet Forward Acknowledgements 1.0 Introduction 2.0 Previous Studies 3.0 Case Studies 4.0 Guidelines for Identifying and Evaluating Potential Road Diet Candidate Sites References Glossary of Terms and Abbreviations
  • 19. Road Diets - Summary • Meet transportation need • Safety benefits • Livability Benefits • Asset to the community • Compatible with the environment • Cost-effective • “Better than Before”
  • 20. Contact Information Jennifer A. Rosales, P.E. Parsons Brinckerhoff Portland, Oregon, USA rosales@pbworld.com (503) 478-2347

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