empowering youth through media and digital arts

2011 ANNUAL REPORT
MEDIA CREDITS
Pg 3. 	

Photo by Kristie Kahns

Pg 9. 	

Street-Level Annual Benefit photos, top to bottom: Elliot Velez, K...
From the Director
2011 marked an exciting year of change for Street-Level.
After several years of planning and much antici...
OUR MISSION
Street-Level Youth Media educates Chicago’s urban youth in media arts and emerging
technology for use in self-...
about Street-Level
STREET-LEVEL YOUTH MEDIA sprang from a simple idea: What if young people had
video cameras to document ...
[ 6 ] www.street-level.org
our history
1995: 	 Street-Level incorporates as a 501(c)3 nonprofit
1996: 	 Youth document Democratic National Convention...
before...

[ 8 ] www.street-level.org

...after!
our new home
IN FALL 2011, Street-Level opened the doors to our new
multimedia center at 1637 North Ashland Avenue. The
fa...
[ 10 ] www.street-level.org
on-site programs
OVER THE COURSE OF 2011, over 500 youth ages 8

Organizations and the Local Youth Leadership

to 22 took ...
summer arts apprenticeship program
FOR THE NINTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR, Street-

“I felt like I connected with many students in...
PORTAGE
PARK

l
Clemente High School

Von Humboldt
Elementary

music production • after school

video production • after s...
school partnerships
STREET-LEVEL BELIEVES that innovative media arts

integration — where we collaborate with classroom

e...
2011 financials
CURRENT ASSETS

PUBLIC INCOME & REVENUE

Cash and cash equivalents.....................$679,634

Contract ...
who We Are
BOARD  STAFF FROM JAN 1 TO DEC 31, 2011

board of directors
Eddie Clopton, Jr.
Meg Comer
Will Fletcher
Courtney...
Our Supporters
FOUNDATION, CORPORATE, GOVERNMENT,
 COMMUNITY SUPPORTERS

IN-KIND SUPPORTERS
The Art Institute of Chicago

...
Thanh Mai Nyugen
Jack Pace
Tony Streit
$100–499
Robert Acton
Lorilynn Ando
Stephen Beard
Clark Bell
Peter Bennett
Lolly Bo...
what your donation can fund
$25	

Set of headphones for video and audio production projects

$50	

Memory cards to capture...
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2011 Street-Level Annual Report

  1. 1. empowering youth through media and digital arts 2011 ANNUAL REPORT
  2. 2. MEDIA CREDITS Pg 3. Photo by Kristie Kahns Pg 9. Street-Level Annual Benefit photos, top to bottom: Elliot Velez, Kristie Kahns, Kristie Kahns, Kristie Kahns Pg 12. Lower left graphic: “Power to the Change,” Marcus Anthony Pg 13. Youth spotlight photo by Willie Pirtle; Background music: “Back to Reality, Part I,” Darion Williams-Bangs Pg 14. Clockwise from top: Music production at Clemente High School, video by James Duke; “Hypnotic,” Ebony Marshall, Young Women’s Leadership Charter School; “Resurrection,” Juarez High School video production; “Violence,” Dvorak Elementary; Audio & video production, Vaughn High School; Screen shot, micheleclarkmedia.weebly.com Pg 17. “Shared Canvas,” Jaylon Tucker All other photos and media © Street-Level Youth Media.
  3. 3. From the Director 2011 marked an exciting year of change for Street-Level. After several years of planning and much anticipation, we laid the foundation for our future growth with the opening of our new multimedia center this past fall. Street-Level made bold goals that entailed some risks when we set out to develop this new site amidst uncertain economic times. However, like all our efforts, we rose up and met the challenge because of our steadfast commitment to give underserved youth the best educational media arts experience to support their growth. Within our new walls, Street-Level has built a digital playground where young people can discover their passions and explore new ways of expressing themselves. We’ve equipped our studio and classroom training labs with tools that help youth stretch their imaginations and learn to be nimble in our everchanging media and technology landscape. We’ve designed a culturally-vibrant and inviting space for young people from across the city to gather regularly, so they can share and celebrate their artistic talents with one another. Through our media arts programs, we’ve also established a supportive environment for youth to cultivate their unique voice, learn to communicate with confidence, and responsibly engage with the world around them. In collaboration with their peers and adult mentors, young people process the issues they face, formulate questions to investigate, and together, nurture intergenerational visions of better futures through the media they create. Street-Level is proud of the media arts opportunities we have developed for our youth. My heartfelt thanks go to all our staff, Board, partners, and supporters whose contributions make this important work possible. Sincerely, Manwah Lee Executive Director Street-Level Youth Media • 2011 Annual Report [ 3 ]
  4. 4. OUR MISSION Street-Level Youth Media educates Chicago’s urban youth in media arts and emerging technology for use in self-expression, communication, and social change. Street-Level’s programs build critical thinking skills for young people who have been historically neglected by public policy makers and mass media. Using video, audio, graphic design, digital photography, and the Internet, Street-Level youth address community issues, access advanced technology, and gain inclusion in our information-based society.
  5. 5. about Street-Level STREET-LEVEL YOUTH MEDIA sprang from a simple idea: What if young people had video cameras to document the world as they saw it? What stories would they tell? What could they teach us? As it turned out: everything. In the summer of 1992, as part of Sculpture Chicago’s “Culture in Action” initiative, west side Chicago youth made forty videos on topics ranging from gangs and families to the gradual gentrification of their neighborhood. The youth collaborated with an artist collective and threw a giant block party where their videos were installed on monitors up and down the street. The block party attracted over one thousand visitors — and national attention. The success of this and subsequent community-based public art efforts inspired Street-Level to officially incorporate as a nonprofit organization, dedicated to youth empowerment through media. On the eve of the twentieth anniversary of that first project, Street-Level now annually engages nearly 1,000 young people from all over Chicago in media arts production. Programs have grown to include audio and music production, stop-motion animation, multimedia journalism, digital photography, and graphic design. Training workshops take place year-round at our new West Town community multimedia center. Street-Level also partners with Chicago Public Schools and other youth providers to bring our media expertise into the classroom and to out-of-school settings. Under the guidance of our professional media instructors, youth gain not just technical media skills, but also essential critical thinking and digital literacy skills for today’s information-driven world. At Street-Level, youth find a safe and supportive environment to speak out on what matters most to them and their communities. In all programs, Street-Level creates opportunities for youth to access media arts and digital technology not readily available in their schools or homes. More than 95% of Street-Level participants are youth of color and about 85% hail from low-income families. All of our programs are offered free of charge, eliminating financial barriers to media arts participation. Street-Level Youth Media • 2011 Annual Report [ 5 ]
  6. 6. [ 6 ] www.street-level.org
  7. 7. our history 1995: Street-Level incorporates as a 501(c)3 nonprofit 1996: Youth document Democratic National Convention in Chicago 1997: Neutral Ground on Chicago Ave. opens as Street-Level’s primary program site 1998: Street-Level receives the first Coming Up Taller Award from President Clinton’s Committee on the Arts & Humanities 1999: Street-Level expands special projects and earned income initiatives to grow our financial capacity 2000: Street-Level launches full-tuition scholarship program in partnership with Columbia College Chicago 2001: “Peace Sign” project is featured on billboards across Chicago 2002: “Out of the Loop” video featured at Chicago History Museum 2003: Street-Level receives the first Microsoft Unlimited Potential Award 2004: Street-Level retrospective “Urban Expressions” opens at the Field Museum of Chicago 2005: Street-Level’s 10th anniversary 2006: Youth travel to New Orleans to document and participate in Katrina rebuilding efforts 2007: Street-Level upgrades technology and software, and builds out first recording studio 2008: Student exhibition “My Community Matters” opens at Chicago Children’s Museum; Neutral Ground destroyed in a fire 2009: Media programs resume in Street-Level’s transitional space on Augusta Blvd. in Humboldt Park 2010: Street-Level launches new logo and visual identity project 2011: Street-Level opens new community multimedia arts center and production studio in West Town, and reveals a fresh, rebranded website Street-Level Youth Media • 2011 Annual Report [ 7 ]
  8. 8. before... [ 8 ] www.street-level.org ...after!
  9. 9. our new home IN FALL 2011, Street-Level opened the doors to our new multimedia center at 1637 North Ashland Avenue. The facility features two Mac computer labs, a youth media gallery, and a professional-level multimedia production studio with two control rooms and a multipurpose sound stage — all designed exclusively for young people. Street-Level celebrated the new center with a grand opening benefit on September 29. The gala offered friends and supporters a unique behind-the-scenes preview of the center’s construction before youth media workshops got underway on October 17. Since opening day, Street-Level has welcomed youth, educators, and community members for after-school workshops, school field trips, film screenings, performances, and our youth-led Free 4 All open mic night. 5,250 35 21 Square feet in our new center Mac computers for youth to use Of 50 Chicago wards represented by our youth Street-Level Youth Media • 2011 Annual Report [ 9 ]
  10. 10. [ 10 ] www.street-level.org
  11. 11. on-site programs OVER THE COURSE OF 2011, over 500 youth ages 8 Organizations and the Local Youth Leadership to 22 took part in workshops, field trips, and special Council to launch Free 4 All, a youth-run monthly events at Street-Level. open mic night that also spotlights local and Youth from twenty-seven different schools emerging artists. enrolled in after-school and summer media arts In all our program activities, Street-Level workshops at Street-Level. Participants of all skill fosters youth leadership and 21st-century skill levels learned to operate media equipment such development. Our program alumni serve as as video cameras, hand-held recorders, boom teaching assistants, studio engineers, and event microphones, digital cameras, and midi keyboards. emcees, and contribute to our on-going program They learned scriptwriting, interviewing, beat- development process. making, composition, and graphics, and brought it all together by editing with industry-standard software. Through the lens of media, youth investigated issues like civic engagement, crosscultural differences, community representation, and even the federal budget. From January to September at our Augusta Blvd. location, youth participated in workshops “It was challenging to be able to make a video that would be able to catch the attention of young people, but also be informational to people who are older and who we want to listen and understand how WE want this money to be spent for our future.” such as Musicology (music), Digital Exposures (photography), Digital Fusion (multimedia arts), — Arani Shearrill, age 12 “If I Had a Trillion Dollars” workshop participant the Summer Arts Apprenticeship Program, and our summer media arts bootcamps. From October to December at our new Ashland Avenue center, youth enrolled in Homegrown (video), If I Had a Trillion Dollars (video), The Hero (music), and Digital Exposures (photography). With our expanded space, the scope of our activities also grew. We launched a field trip program that has brought even more Chicago public school students to Street-Level to participate in intensive audio and video workshops using professional-grade media equipment. In November, we partnered with the Alliance of Local Service Street-Level Youth Media • 2011 Annual Report [ 11 ]
  12. 12. summer arts apprenticeship program FOR THE NINTH CONSECUTIVE YEAR, Street- “I felt like I connected with many students in the Level’s Summer Arts Apprenticeship Program (SAAP) program, not just my mentees,” reflected mentor provided fifteen advanced teen artists with the Allison Yasukawa. “I saw all of them achieve great opportunity to take their media skills to the next things at different points in the program... They level. Apprentices developed a deeper engagement really worked collaboratively to figure out how to with media production, arts criticism, and Chicago’s use materials and tell stories in truly creative ways.” rich arts and cultural scene. They also learned about teamwork, organization, and self-management. Working around this year’s theme of “Chance, SAAP’s final group exhibition, Brave Youth Voices, was presented at Yollocalli Arts Reach in Pilsen from August to September. Choice, and Change,” the apprentices created original multimedia artwork in collaboration with adult artist mentors, seasoned professionals who, in turn, found they learned a lot from the teens. Mentor Frank Rinaldi believes his SAAP experience strengthened him as an artist. “I was forced to make sure my grasp on the fundamentals of technique and theory were absolutely solid,” he explained. “I would love to teach, mentor and volunteer in the future.” Friends, families, and community members celebrate the summer apprentices’ accomplishments at the Brave Youth Voices opening reception at Yollocalli. Youth Spotlight: Darion Williams-Bangs SWING BY STREET-LEVEL just about any afternoon and you’re likely to find Clemente High School senior Darion Williams-Bangs in the studio working the mixing board or writing music. A 2011 participant in the Summer Arts Apprenticeship Program (SAAP), Darion has grown along with StreetLevel’s audio programs in the last year and a half, as both moved from the limited production space at StreetLevel’s previous location to the current state-of-the-art recording studio. Darion’s experience of recording his first beat in Street-Level’s afterschool program at Clemente hooked him on the process. “It was kind of exciting because you get an idea of how you want this to sound, how you want everyone else to react from it. I was like, ‘Oh my god, this is so awesome.’” Building on that success, Darion was selected for SAAP, an intensive eight-week experience that allowed him to develop his skills even more. His final project was a three-part hip-hop production titled “Back to Reality” that documented a young man’s journey through life’s challenges. While learning different beat-making programs and how to run the mixing board have occupied a lot of Darion’s time, it is his growth as an artist that he identifies as the program’s biggest impact. Before Street-Level, he says, “I would just write music just to do it, but now I actually start to think about, what am I writing? What message am I trying to display?” A young man who considers himself a positive artist, Darion has big goals for his future in music. “The music that I make in my head, I hear it as a number one hit. That’s how I view everything that I do and that’s the way I want everyone else to view it, as something special, something you could vibe to.” Street-Level Youth Media • 2011 Annual Report [ 13 ]
  13. 13. PORTAGE PARK l Clemente High School Von Humboldt Elementary music production • after school video production • after school AUSTIN HUMBOLDT PARK Lake Michigan WEST TOWN E. GARFIELD PARK l Michele Clark High School l l Marshall Metro High School l l NORTH LAWNDALE music production • after school LOWER WEST SIDE l multimedia journalism • after school l Dvorak Technology Academy DOUGLAS Young Women’s Leadership Charter School multimedia • arts integration multimedia • after school Juarez High School video production • after school Vaughn High School audio/video production • in-school elective Dunne Technology Academy multimedia • arts integration WASHINGTON HEIGHTS l Street-Level has teamed with Vaughn for more than three years, during which time students have written and produced original media that share positive messages and reduce sterotypes. The work is part of Vaughn’s senior seminar, in which students use the training they receive from Street-Level to develop life skills and engage in advocacy on behalf of their peers. In 2011, Vaughn students collaborated to produce create songs and videos that addressed cyberbullying, disability pride, and the importance of respecting young women. The partnership was strengthened and extended through field trips to Street-Level’s multimedia center. “With the help of the experts from Street-Level,” said teacher Kelly Tepastte, “we are able to give students creative license in their work and help them create incredible music and video. I am very proud of my students and extremely thankful for the opportunity to work with Street-Level Youth Media.” l ROSELAND Gillespie Elementary music production • arts integration
  14. 14. school partnerships STREET-LEVEL BELIEVES that innovative media arts integration — where we collaborate with classroom education and access to cultural production and teachers on media projects that enhance student digital technology builds the foundation for future achievement in core subjects like math and success. To widen our program reach, Street-Level science — and in-school electives and after-school partners with Chicago Public Schools to bring our workshops that emphasize media arts education media arts education programming into the school and personal youth development. setting. In 2011, we worked with ten Chicago public elementary and high schools, serving nearly 450 students all across the city. Our school-based programs take the form of arts Among our in-school projects, students used multimedia tools to explore science and biological viruses, raise awareness about school bullying, and report on food deserts and healthy nutrition. “In 1871 a fire burned down the town, and it all started with Mrs.O’Leary’s cow. Bow bow, fire shot all around. Then the whole town burned down. People’s lives were changing, and after that Chicago was never the same.” — Lyrics to “Greatest City of All” Ms. Banks’ 5th grade class, Gillespie Elementary 393 Final media arts projects produced by youth 13 Partner teachers 8 Youth media showcases, screenings, & events Street-Level Youth Media • 2011 Annual Report [ 15 ]
  15. 15. 2011 financials CURRENT ASSETS PUBLIC INCOME & REVENUE Cash and cash equivalents.....................$679,634 Contract services........................................$89,613 Prepaid expenses............................... ...........$7,628 Foundation grants.....................................$567,150 Fixed assets................................................$533,796 Government funds....................................$102,700 (net of accumulated depreciation of $275,164) Security deposit...........................................$13,120 Total Assets..........................................$1,234,178 Corporate contributions............................$36,216 Individual contributions............................$35,682 In-kind contributions........................ ........ $49,063 Interest................................................. ...............$331 Total Income...........................................$880,755 CURRENT LIABILITIES Accounts payable........................................$64,138 Long-term debt.........................................$142,224 EXPENSES Security deposit...........................................$13,120 Total Liabilities.......................................$206,362 Program services............................... ......$468,018 Administration.................................... ........ $90,706 Fundraising..................................................$62,264 NET ASSETS Total Expenses........................................$620,988 Unrestricted........................................ ......$556,636 Temporarily restricted..............................$471,180 Total Net Assets......................................$1,027,816 Total Liabilities Net Assets.............$1,234,178 “Before I was shy, and I never really showed anyone my talent. Now, ever since StreetLevel and all the classes I’ve been in, they showed me, don’t be afraid, be brave and just do what you love and follow your dreams.” — Vanessa Roldan, age 12 musician video producer [ 16 ] www.street-level.org
  16. 16. who We Are BOARD STAFF FROM JAN 1 TO DEC 31, 2011 board of directors Eddie Clopton, Jr. Meg Comer Will Fletcher Courtney Gray Shawn Healy Tim Irwin Russell Lewis Lisa Montez Leilani Sweeney Street-Level staf f James Duke Media Instructor Steven Evans Program Coordinator Marc Furigay Director of Education Maria Krasinski Development Manager Chris Lee Media Instructor Manwah Lee Executive Director Aasia Mohammad Community Outreach Coordinator Maricela Zapian Administrative Marketing Coordinator teaching corps Mireya Acierto Jonathan Alvin Erin Barnard Rhonda Jackson Heather Jurewicz Devin Katayama Jeneba Koroma Sean Owens Frank Rinaldi Michael Sirianni Rico Sisney Asha Tamirisa Street-Level Youth Media • 2011 Annual Report [ 15 ]
  17. 17. Our Supporters FOUNDATION, CORPORATE, GOVERNMENT, COMMUNITY SUPPORTERS IN-KIND SUPPORTERS The Art Institute of Chicago $250,000+ Arts Spirits Kresge Foundation Branch 27 $100,000+ Street-Level McCormick Foundation Chicago Cubs Chicago Filmmakers Chicago Shakespeare Theater for our many supporters, Chicago White Sox After School Matters Cinema/Chicago Challenge Grant for Journalism Core Fitness Chicago $25,000–49,999 is grateful $50,000–99,999 CRO Chicago Community Trust DLA Piper Chicago Public Schools Eilts Associates Illinois Department of Commerce Economic Opportunity Facets Multimedia $10,000–24,999 Alphawood Foundation without whom none of this would Artworks Fund Chicago Department of Cultural Affairs Special Events Chicago Department of Family Support Services Exelon Lloyd A. Fry Foundation Leo S. Guthman Fund Illinois Arts Council NAMM Foundation be possible. Prince Charitable Trusts g*boutique Gene Siskel Film Center Gorilla Tango Theatre IFF Jerry’s Sandwiches Jones Day JW Salon Kidrobot Komoda Logitech Lou Malnati’s Museum of Contemporary Art $1,000–9,999 Om on the Range Yoga Studio @properties Friends Neighbors Fund Philosophy Annonymous Ray’s Bucktown BB Chicago Youth Voices Network Ray Villalobos Day 1 Studios Samuel Adams Deutsche Bank Shure JP Morgan Chase Solex Partners kCura Vin Divino John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Midwest Game Developers’ Kickball Tournament Peoples Gas Up to $999 Chevron Chicago Tribune Foundation Columbia College Chicago Fleet Feet Gap Giving Campaign Global Giving Foundation Kraft Foods Foundation MB Financial MD Investments Native Foods Pew Center for Arts Heritage Phosphor Games P.K. Johnson Associates [ 18 ] www.street-level.org INDIVIDUAL SUPPORTERS $1,000+ Richard Berger Meg Comer Will Fletcher Courtney Gray Shawn Healy Andrew Hixson Timothy Irwin Russell Lewis Lisa Montez $500–999 Leslie Bluhm Eddie Clopton Cinnamin Malone
  18. 18. Thanh Mai Nyugen Jack Pace Tony Streit $100–499 Robert Acton Lorilynn Ando Stephen Beard Clark Bell Peter Bennett Lolly Bowean Gary Burgess Jennifer Cadigan Robert Carroll Chris Cobb Justin Corcoran Patrick Curry Matt Daugherty J.E. Dillon Helen Doria Matthew Doucet Michael Flores Ed Foppe Jeena Greenwalt Venu Gupta Maria Gutierrez Rhonda Haney Shaun Himmerick Elaine Hodgson William Vicki Hood Elena Jiang Jennie Jiang Paul Johnson Zack Jordan Thomas Kang Christopher Keyser Chris Krastel Jonathon Krusell David Lang Karen Langham Corinna Lema Cathy Linn-Thorstenson Nancy Erwin Maher Louis Marsico Cory Marzullo Ismael Medeles Matthew Miller Hoang Nguyen Mark Norman Eric Nyquist Fred O’Connor Daniel Panuska Nicholas Pavlidis Bruce Philipson Mary Purcell Erik Purins Susan Rider Eric Sacks Amy Schiciano Ronald Sonenthal Lyn Soo Hoo Gerry Gwen Swanson Kelly Tepastte Matthew Twetten Michael Urda Andras Connie Vari Nancy Wall Jesse Woghin Phyllis Zendejas Up to $99 Angela Adams Miguel Alba James Altman Emily Anderson Zoe Anderson Jill Antoniewicz Deborah Anzalone Katherine August Ashley Ausikaitis Mirza Baig Kyle Bailey Clark Bell Richard Bernal Megan Bernard Chelsea Blasko-Muse Katrina Bockus Katharine Boss William Bramer Lori Brayer Courtney Brouwer Joseph Budlovsky Alicia Burke Cedric Busse Frank Buttitta Jim Butts Anne Cadigan John Calcagno John Mary Ellen Capuzzo Christopher Cariano Richard Carle Dustin Carroll Matt Carter Julio Castillo Cynthia Cata Nathanial Cavalieri Rhoda Chang Jeremy Chapman Salome Chasnoff Lindsay Cochrane Jeremy Conkin Hillary Cook Josh Criz Daniela Denaro Adriana DeVost Joe DiBernardo Zach Duffy Cynthia Durley Bryce Dwyer Patrick Dwyer Thomas Eastman Josh Edelman Emily Egan Erik Eidukas Joseph Heather Emrich Cody Engle Christopher Erikson Chad Jan Fellah Mindy Fishel Boris Fisher Eileen Flaherty Daniel Forden Michael Foy Marilyn Franck Annie Funke Julie Furigay Kate Geisler Adam Goff Mark Gorski Melissa Graves Elizabeth Gray William Gray Brian Greenblatt Sandy Guttman Jaroslaw Gwarnicki Roxana Hadad Craig Haines Geoff Haines Colleen Harvey Rita Heusinger Roger Hirsch Christopher Hoeft Nicholas Hoeft Steven Hoeft Kevin Hoke Christopher Horlacher Iwei Doris Huang Roberto Hurtado Ellen Hutchinson Emily Johnson Linda Kalata Megan Kane Scott Kapp Mary Kelly May Lin Kessenich Mayra Khan Eric Kiander Johnny Kidd Daniel Kim Barbara Koenen Gary Krasinski Tessa Kwant James LaBelle Christopher Lacalamita Matt Langton Beth LaRocca Thomas Catherine LaRocca Emily Lautenbach Mary Lewis Diana Linn Daniel Loane Amelia Love Christopher Magnus John Malloy Joey Manso Matthew Marsden Andrew Massari Scott Matott Benjamin Mazza Jeff McCarter Meghan McLaren Erin McLaughlan Lourdes Milian Jennifer Mills Aasia Mohammad Amber Mohammad Peter Mondejar Austin Montgomery Zach Mortice Sujatha Nagarajan Samuel Nallen Daniel Nelson Anthony Nelson Chris Smith Amalia Snowdon Adam Stanley Regina Stefancic Benjamin Stokes Kristine Strom Shannon Stubblefield Julie Swartz Joe Szulkowski Sandra Szulkowski Dina Tallarico Ellen Tani Juan Tejedor Andrea Temkin Jessica Terlikowski Cindy Ternes Diana Teruel Alice Thomes Barbara Thompson Ardy Curt Thorstenson John Neumann Aaron Newton Dan Nikolaides Geralyn Navarro Robert Nyblad Michael O’Connor Mary O’Malley Matt O’Neill Melissa Oglesby Ken Overbey Joseph Palmer Kate Palmer Meghan Palmer James Pappachen Gladstone Payton Ben Perez Anthony Perkins Gus Peterson Bonnie Pleuthner John Podlasek Jen Pollard Kenneth Porrello Frank Pusateri Cindy Recht Elizabeth Richter Sherri Rinker Michael Rios Cary Robertson Gretchen Roecker Vanessa Sanchez Harvey Sanders Peter Sauerbrei Leslie Schramer Erica Schuetz Shannon Schuyler Michael Scodro Steve Sengele Timothy Shymkus Joseph Simons Anthony Smith Casey Smith Kurt Tillmanns Michael Tisdale Fereshteh Toosi Joshua Tsui Dahlia Tulett Micah Uetricht Jeremy Underhill Frank Valadez Elizabeth Van Fleet Doug vanderHoof David Vari Vanessa Vari Rebecca Vaughn-Stepter Katherine Walsh Kelsey Wander Lindsey Weeks Katherine Whitington George Wietor John Williams Brian Wing Mary Beth Witte Allyn Woghin Helen Steven Woghin Christopher Zalek Doug Zartman Katherine Zartman Teresa Zbiciak Street-Level Youth Media • 2011 Annual Report [ 19 ]
  19. 19. what your donation can fund $25 Set of headphones for video and audio production projects $50 Memory cards to capture audio interviews, photographs, documentary video $100 Refreshments for a media showcase, where youth share their work with friends, family, community members $500 Hand-held recorders for ten students in an audio production class $750 Youth stipend for ten-week advanced studio internship $1000 Digital photography kit, including dSLR camera, lens, batteries, and case $5000 One year of professional printing of youth work, postcards, program brochures Help us make a difference for 1,000 Chicago youth each year. Visit street-level.org/donate to give today. STREET-LEVEL YOUTH MEDIA 1637 N. Ashland Ave. | Chicago, IL 60622 T 773.862.5331 | F 773.969.5376 | info@street-level.org street-level.org

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