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Ed 633 persuasive arguement presentation

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ED 633 - Persuasive argument presentation

ED 633 - Persuasive argument presentation

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  • With this slide I will start out by introducing myself and discussing my purpose for the presentation. I will discuss how technology integration is “essential” for student success.
  • This will be the summary of the presentation – I researched the information and came up with 5 goals to help improve the impact that the use of effective technology will have on student learning. The presentation will begin with the following idea. Our great technology program began because many of you had a vision (‘ See the picture ’ of what needs to be accomplished at our school for our students with the use of technology to succeed). Some of you along with members of our staff and administration then needed to ‘ sell the picture ’ to get everybody onboard on what we intended to accomplish with the implementation of our technology – see the 5 major points below. It is impossible to sell the picture to everybody until the leaders decide on the best plan of action – if not then our organization will be like a boat without a rudder drifting aimlessly in the seas. We are now in the ‘ painting of our picture ’ stage and I would like to share with you how the technologies that you have purchased for our school have impacted student learning positively across the nation. **This is my menu slide and allows me to jump to the correct slide dealing with each of the 5 major goals. The other slides contain a “home” link that will return the presenter to this slide.
  • Kulik’s study showed students who used computer-based instruction scored at the 64 th percentile on tests of achievement compared to students in the control conditions without computers who scored at the 50 th percentile. Students like their classes more and develop more positive attitudes when their classes include computer-based instruction Sivin-Kachala study found that students’ attitudes toward learning and their own self-concept improved consistently when computers were used in instruction. Dale Mann’s study of West Virginia’s (BS/CE) found it was more cost effective in improving student achievement than: Class size reduction from 35 to 20 Increasing instructional time Cross age tutoring programs
  • Study of entire state of West Virginia – 4 th & 8 th grade students – analysis of new educational technologies that students with access to one or more of the following – showed positive gains in achievement on researcher constructed tests, standardized tests and national tests (Schacter) Computer assisted instruction Integrated learning systems technology Simulations and softward that teaches higher order thinking Collaborative networked technologies Design & programming technologies
  • Two studies have been conducted that reinforce that technology will help students with their higher order thinking & problem-solving skill development.
  • Remind them about “higher-order” thinking skills – quick review of Blooms Taxonomy and the relationship to a quality education.  Knowledge Comprehension Application Analysis Synthesis Evaluation
  • Ultimately we want to produce students who will be ready to become members of the workforce and we want them to be as prepared as possible and technology is one of the keys that will required. Technology will be an important “tool”. Read the quotes.
  • Read the quote from Harvey-Woodall -- “Teachers are the key and professional development must be constantly analyzed to determine the most productive way to help teachers understand the importance of innovative ways to make the use of technology foster learning” (Harvey-Woodall) Teachers can’t forget what makes them effective in the classroom. The key is to ENHANCE the lesson by using technology. Lesson planning should focus first on content and classroom strategies, then on ways in which technologies can enhance the lesson. (Brabec)
  • Learning ‘from’ computers vs. learning ‘with’ technology (Ringstaff). The uses of computer technology is constantly changing and improving and teachers need to move from simply using the computer as a tool where students learn “from” the machine to guiding the students to use the technology and learn “with” the computer. The more advanced uses of technology support the constructivist view of learning in which the teacher is a facilitator of learning rather than the classroom’s only source of knowledge. *
  • Continue to plan before purchasing (see the picture) Adequate computer-to-student ratio to provide access – goal should be 1:5 (Ringstaff) – This will need to be stressed. And obviously requires money to become a reality. Study of schools in NY indicate that in schools that had more instructional technology – as well as teacher training – the average increase in the percentage of hs students who too & passed the state Regents exam in mathematics was 7.5 Revisit technology plan on an ongoing process Build ongoing costs into budget (Help continue to “paint” the picture)
  • Reiterate the 5 major goals to help improve the impact that the use of effective technology will have on student learning and connect the original idea of “the picture”. See the picture Sell the picture Paint the picture!
  • Works cited.

Transcript

  • 1. The Impact of Technology on Student Learning Bradley Strand Ed 633 – Persuasive Argument Presentation
  • 2. 5 Major Goals
    • Achievement in content area learning (Improved Standardized Test Scores)
    • Higher order thinking & problem-solving skill development
    • Workforce preparation
    • Teacher Professional Development
    • Long term planning – “Vision”
  • 3. Achievement in content area learning (Improved Standardized Test Scores)
    • Kulik’s study showed students who used computer-based instruction scored at the 64 th percentile on tests of achievement compared to students in the control conditions without computers who scored at the 50 th percentile .
    • Sivin-Kachala study found that students’ attitudes toward learning and their own self-concept improved consistently when computers were used in instruction.
    • Dale Mann’s study of West Virginia’s (BS/CE) found it was more cost effective in improving student achievement than:
      • Class size reduction from 35 to 20
      • Increasing instructional time
      • Cross age tutoring programs
  • 4. Achievement in content area learning (Improved Standardized Test Scores)
    • Study of entire state of West Virginia – 4 th & 8 th grade students – analysis of new educational technologies that students with access to one or more of the following – showed positive gains in achievement on researcher constructed tests, standardized tests and national tests (Schacter)
      • Computer assisted instruction
      • Integrated learning systems technology
      • Simulations and software that teaches higher order thinking
      • Collaborative networked technologies
      • Design & programming technologies
  • 5. Higher Order Thinking & Problem-Solving Skill Development The ACOT (Apple Classrooms of Tomorrow) experience appeared to result in new learning experiences requiring higher level reasoning and problem solving. Students will demonstrate higher levels of motivation and are more engaged when using technology which contributes to improved achievement (Harvey-Woodall)
  • 6. Higher Order Thinking & Problem-Solving Skill Development Higher-order thinking skills developed with the use of technologies 1. Researching skills 2. Comparing and contrasting skills 3. Synthesizing skills 4. Analyzing skills 5. Evaluating skills “ Research and evaluation shows that technology can enable the development of critical thinking skills when students use technology presentation and communication tools to present, publish, and share results of projects” (Cradler et al)
  • 7. Workforce Preparation “ When content and problem-solving strategies meet accepted education standards, technology increases mastery of vocational and workforce skills and helps prepare students for work” (Cradler et al) “ Research shows that when students learn to use & apply applications used in the world of work, such as word processors, spreadsheets, computer-aided drawing, web site development programs, and the Internet, they acquire some of the prerequisite skills for workforce preparedness” (Cradler et al) “ It is important to view technology as a tool, rather than an end in itself” (Brabec et al)
  • 8. Teacher Professional Development
  • 9. Teacher Professional Development Understand the difference of learning “from” a computer vs. learning “with” a computer! (Ringstaff & Kelley ) It is important that the teacher takes a “ constructivist ” view when using technology to improve student learning.
  • 10. Long Term Planning – “Vision”
    • Continue to plan before purchasing ( “see the picture” )
        • Adequate computer-to-student ratio to provide access – goal should be 1:5 (Ringstaff & Kelley)
        • Study of schools in NY indicate that in schools that had more instructional technology – as well as teacher training – the average increase in the percentage of high school students who took & passed the state Regents exam in mathematics was 7.5 (Ringstaff & Kelley)
    • Revisit technology plan on an ongoing process
    • Build ongoing costs into budget
    • (Help continue to “paint the picture” )
  • 11. Conclusion
  • 12. Bibliography
    • Brabec, K. F. (n.d.). Building Better Instruction: How Technology Supports Nine Research-Proven Instructional Strategies. Research Reports, . Retrieved October 26, 2010, from http://www.mcrel.org/topics/EducationalTechnology/products/236/
    • Cradler, J., McNabb, M., Freeman, M., & Burchett, R. (2002). How Does Technology Influence Student Learning? Learning & Leading with Technology , 29 (8), 46-56.  
    • Harvey-Woodall, A. (2009, July 16). Integrating Technology into the Classroom: How Does It Impact Student Achievement? Online Submission . Retrieved October 26, 2010, from http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/contentdelivery/servlet/ERICServlet?accno=ED505984
    • Ringstaff, C., & Kelley, L. (2002). The Learning Return On Our Educational Technology Investment - A Review of Findings from Research. WestEd . Retrieved from http://www.wested.org/online_pubs/learning_return.pdf  
    • Schacter, J. (n.d.). The Impact of Educational Technology on Student Achievement: What the Most Current Research Has to Say. Milken Exchange on Education Technology . Retrieved from http://www.mff.org/pubs/ME161.pdf