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Environmental Site Design (ESD) Presentation
 

Environmental Site Design (ESD) Presentation

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Presentation on Maryland's 2009 Environmental Site Design stormwater management regulations

Presentation on Maryland's 2009 Environmental Site Design stormwater management regulations

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    Environmental Site Design (ESD) Presentation Environmental Site Design (ESD) Presentation Presentation Transcript

    •  
    • CONTEXT
      • Jurisdiction: Maryland
      • Philosophy: Forward thinking
      • Excitement: Embracing change
    • ESD Philosophy
      • Environmental Site Design (ESD)
      Low Impact Development (LID) Better Site Design Green Infrastructure Sustainable Site Design
    • ESD Philosophy Replicate Existing (Woods!) hydrology Small scale practices Non-structural techniques Site planning techniques Conservation of natural features Drainage patterns Soils Vegetation Minimize impervious surfaces Slow down runoff Timing Infiltration Evapotranspiration 1-Year Design Storm
    • ESD Background
    • ESD Background Stormwater Management Act of 2007
        • Local ordinance revisions
        • Revise Chapter 5 of the MD SWM Design Manual
        • Stormwater
        • Zoning
        • Public Works
        • Phased SWM design & review process
        • Implement ESD planning techniques
        • ESD to the Maximum Extent Practicable (MEP)
        • Structural practices as last priority
    • ESD Background Stormwater Management Act of 2007 October 1, 2007 Act Effective May 5, 2009 COMAR revisions effective April 15, 2009 Design Manual Chapter 5 Revised November 11, 2009 Local ordinances due to MDE May 4, 2010 Local ordinances must be adopted
    • ESD Background Pre-2000 Stormwater Management
      • Efficient conveyance
      • Site planning & grading for storm drain systems
      • Channelize flows
      • “ Efficiency is the Goal”
    • ESD Background Pre-2000 Stormwater Management
      • End-of-pipe treatment
      • Primarily flood control / Secondary WQ
      • Sporadic aesthetic value
      • Not integrated into the site design
      • Land planning – put it in the low area
      • The fewer facilities, the better
      Simple site planning Easy grading design
    • ESD Background Pre-2000 Stormwater Management
      • INNOVATIVE
      • THINKING
    • ESD Background 2000 to Present - 2000 Maryland Design Manual
      • Center for Watershed Protection
      • Years of review
      • Embraced recent innovations
      • Potential for multiple facilities integrated into site design
      • Exemption: 2 cfs
    • ESD Background 2000 to Present - 2000 Maryland Design Manual infiltration basin infiltration trench pocket wetland pond/wetland system ED shallow wetland shallow wetland wet extended detention multiple pond system wet pond dry swale Bio-retention pocket sand filter organic filter perimeter sand filter underground sand filter surface sand filter wet swale STRUCTURAL PRACTICES
    • ESD Background 2000 to Present - 2000 Maryland Design Manual
      • grass channel
      NON-STRUCTURAL PRACTICES environmentally sensitive development sheet flow to buffers non-rooftop disconnection Rooftop Disconnection natural area conservation “ CREDITS”
    • ESD Background 2000 to Present - 2000 Maryland Design Manual OPTIONAL
    • ESD Background 2000 to Present - 2000 Maryland Design Manual
    • ESD Background 2000 to Present - 2000 Maryland Design Manual
      • RESULTS
      • End-of-pipe options remained
      • No requirement for non-structural practices
      • Local jurisdiction resistance
      • Design community resistance
      • Zoning & Public Works Code conflicts
    • ESD Background 2000 to Present - 2000 Maryland Design Manual NON-STRUCTURAL PRACTICES NOT IMPLEMENTED!
    • ESD Background 2000 to Present - 2000 Maryland Design Manual INTEGRATED SMALL-SCALE PRACTICES NOT IMPLEMENTED!
    • ESD Background 2000 to Present - 2000 Maryland Design Manual
    • Enter… Environmental Site Design Replicate Existing Hydrology Small scale practices Non-structural techniques Site planning techniques Resource constraints
    • Defining ESD to the MEP (aka “THE RULES”)
      • Design process
      • Site and resource mapping
      • Better Site Design techniques
      • Structural practices only when necessary
      • Review process
      • Integrate ES&C
      • The design process will require the developer to adhere to the following procedures to achieve ESD to the MEP:
        • Following the Design Process for New Development as outlined in the step wise procedures in Figure 5.1
        • Developing a map that identifies natural resource areas and drainage patterns and devising strategies for protection and enhancement.
        • Minimizing total site imperviousness by implementing clustered development and other better site design techniques.
        • Demonstrating that all reasonable opportunities for meeting stormwater requirements using ESD have been exhausted by using natural areas and landscape features to manage runoff from impervious surfaces and that structural BMFs have been used only where absolutely necessary.
        • Participate in the comprehensive review process for interim plans review and approval at the conceptual, site development, and final phases ofproject design.
        • Integrating strategies for erosion and sediment control and stormwater management into a comprehensive development plan.
        • Phased SWM design & review process
        • Implement ESD planning techniques
        • ESD to the Maximum Extent Practicable (MEP)
        • Structural practices as last priority
      2 cfs Exemption GONE!
    • ESD Design & Review Process
    • Site and Resource Mapping
    • Better Site Design
      • CWP 1998
      • Narrow streets & sidewalks
      • Cul-de-sacs – smaller radii
      • Open vegetated channels
      • Parking – hold at max / structured
      • Parking lot runoff – landscaped / bioretention
      • Open space – Cluster options
      • Setbacks – Reduce fronts and widths
      • Shared driveways, alternative surfaces
      • Rooftop runoff to pervious
      • Buffers with protection
      • Limit clearing and grading
      • Conservation of contiguous forest
      • Conservation incentives – density, flexibility
    • Better Site Design
      • Reduce impervious areas
      • Road widths, parking, etc.
    • Better Site Design
      • Open vegetated channels
    • Better Site Design
      • Site fingerprinting
    • Better Site Design
      • Clustering
    • Better Site Design
      • Maintain Existing Drainage Patterns
      • Minimize storm drains
      • Avoid large facilities
      • Grading techniques
    • ESD Practices
    • ESD Design Philosophy Eliminate stormwater impacts with materials selection Treat stormwater as close to the source as possible – convey AFTER treatment Use small-scale vegetated practices integrated throughout the site Site layout guidelines Locate green spaces down-slope of impervious for treatment Grade site to maintain sheet flow Avoid concentrated flows
    • ESD Practices
      • Group 1:
      • Alternative Surfaces
      • Group 2:
      • Nonstructural Practices
      • Group 3:
      • Microscale Practices
    • Group 1: Alternative Surfaces
      • A-1 Green Roofs
      • Thickness Options: 2”, 3”, 4”, 6”, 8”
    • Group 1: Alternative Surfaces
    • Group 1: Alternative Surfaces
        • A-2 Permeable Pavements
    • Group 1: Alternative Surfaces
    • Group 1: Alternative Surfaces
      • A-3 Reinforced Turf
    • Group 2: Nonstructural Practices
        • N-1 Disconnection of rooftop runoff
    • Group 2: Nonstructural Practices
        • N-2 Disconnection of non-rooftop runoff
    • Group 2: Nonstructural Practices
        • N-3 Sheetflow to conservation area
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-1 Rainwater Harvesting
        • Rain barrel sizing for credit
        • 311.69 gallons / 500 sf roof
        • 5.67 55 gallon drums
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-2 Submerged Gravel wetlands
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-3 Landscape Infiltration
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-4 Infiltration Berm
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-5 Dry wells
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-6 Micro-bioretention
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-6 Micro-Bioretention Max DA = 20,000 sf
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-6 Micro-bioretention
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-7 Rain gardens Max DA 2000sf/10000sf
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-8 Swales
    • Group 3: Micro-scale Practices
        • M-9 Enhanced Filters Provides recharge
    • Design Examples
    • Example Project Traditional 2000 Design Approach SAND FILTER U/G CMP Cpv
    • Example Project Design Approach #1 MICRO-BIORETENTION REVERSED GRADES
    • Example Project Design Approach #2 CISTERN PERMABLE PAVING SWALE GREENROOF
    • Example Project Design Approach #3 MICRO-BIORETENTION PERMABLE PAVING SWALE
    • Example Project Design Approach #4 SUBMERGED WETLANDS RAIN GARDEN PLANTER BOXES MICRO-BIORETENTION
    • LEED CREDITS
    • LEED Sustainable sites 6.1 Quantity Control
        • Case 1 - Existing Impervious Less Than 50%
        • Option 1 Maintain Existing 1- and 2-Year Rate AND Volume
        • NOT within ESD Practices Design Framework
        • Option 2 Stream Channel Protection
        • Fits within ESD Practices Design Framework
        • Non-ESD Calculations Required
        • Case 2 - Existing Impervious Greater Than 50%
        • Reduce Existing 2-Year Rate AND Volume by 25%
        • NOT within framework of ESD
      LEED 6.1 ESD Peak Discharge Rate Control Y Y Volume Control Y N
    • LEED Sustainable sites 6.1 Quantity Control ESD PRACTICE PEAK VOLUME A-1 Green Roofs Y N A-2 Permeable Pavements Maybe/Enhanced Maybe/Enhanced A-3 Reinforced Turf Maybe/Enhanced Maybe N-1 Disconnection of Rooftop Runoff N N N-2 Disconnection of Non-Rooftop Runoff N N N-3 Sheetflow to Conservation Areas N N M-1 Rainwater Harvesting Maybe/Enhanced Maybe/Enhanced M-2 Submerged Gravel Wetland N N M-3 Landscape Infiltration Maybe/Enhanced Maybe/Enhanced M-4 Infiltration Berms N N M-5 Dry Wells Maybe/Enhanced Maybe/Enhanced M-6 Micro-Bioretention Maybe/Enhanced Maybe/Enhanced M-7 Rain Gardens Maybe/Enhanced Maybe/Enhanced M-8 Swales N N M-9 Enhanced Filters Maybe/Enhanced Maybe/Enhanced
    • LEED Sustainable Sites 6.2 Quality Control
        • 80% Total Suspended Solids (TSS) Removal
        • ESD Meets LEED 6.2 Requirements
      LEED 6.2 ESD Water Quality Control Y Y
    • LEED Sustainable Sites Related Credits
      • SS 5.1 Site Development – Protect or Restore Habitat
        • ESD Resource Protection
        • ESD Site Planning Philosophies
      • SS 5.2 Site Development – Maximize Open Space
        • ESD Resource Protection
        • ESD Site Planning Philosophies
        • ESD Impervious Reduction / Integrated Vegetated Practices
      • SS 7.1 Heat Island Effect – Nonroof
        • Permable Pavements
        • ESD Impervious Reduction / Integrated Vegetated Practices
      • SS 7.2 Heat Island Effect – Roof
        • Green Roof
      • WE 1 Water Efficient landscaping
      • WE 3 Water Use Reduction
        • Rainwater Harvesting
    • Redevelopment
    • Redevelopment
        • 2000 Manual
        • 20% reduction in Existing Impervious, or
        • Provide proportional treatment
        • 2009 Manual
        • Qualification: Existing site must be 40% Impervious
        • 50% Reduction in Existing Impervious, or
        • Provide proportional treatment
        • OPTIONAL  Alternatives
        •     Retrofits
        •     Stream restoration,
        •     Pollution trading
        •     Fees
    • Local Jurisdiction Update
    • Local Jurisdictions
        • MDE delegates SWM authority to locals
        • Meet State criteria
        • MDE reviews of programs
        • Guidance
        • Referring to Chapter 5
        • Some updating local Design Guidance
        • Deviations from Manual
        • Details, details, details
        • Setbacks, underdrain requirements, engineering
        • and public complaint issues
        • Review Processes
        • Within existing frameworks
        • Some additional review steps
        • Expanding agency involvement (SCD)
    • Local Jurisdictions
        • 10- and 100-Year Requirements
        • Areas of flooding only
        • NO credit for ESD practices
        • Zoning / Road Code changes
        • Minor tweaking
        • Builders for the Bay
        • Culmination of 20 years….
        • Grandfathering
        • May 4, 2010
        • SWM and ESC Approval
        • Redevelopment Alternatives
        • Optional
        • Mixed reaction
    • THANKS! Theodore E. Scott, PE, CPESC, LEED AP Stormwater Maintenance, LLC T.E. Scott & Associates, Inc. 128 Cockeysville Road, Suite 200 Hunt Valley, Maryland 21030 tes@MdSWM.com 410.785.0875 www.AppliedStormwater.com hord | coplan | macht 750 East Pratt Street, Suite 1100 Baltimore, Maryland 21202 www.hcm2.com Environmental Site Design Maryland’s Stormwater Design Manual