Health OER: Harnessing OER to Develop Health Education Systems in Africa
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Health OER: Harnessing OER to Develop Health Education Systems in Africa

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These slides were presented by Ted Hanss, University of Michigan; Mary Lee, Tufts University; Catherine Ngugi, OER Africa; Neil Butcher, OER Africa at the OCWC Global 2010 conference in Hanoi, Vietnam ...

These slides were presented by Ted Hanss, University of Michigan; Mary Lee, Tufts University; Catherine Ngugi, OER Africa; Neil Butcher, OER Africa at the OCWC Global 2010 conference in Hanoi, Vietnam (May 5-7, 2010).

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  • 25/11/2009 Catherine Ngugi OER Africa OER in Developing Countries Partnerships for Effective Collaboration
  • OER Africa KeMU Policy Review and OER Workshop
  • Catherine Ngugi OER Africa 25/11/2009 OER in Developing Countries Partnerships for Effective Collaboration
  • Catherine Ngugi OER Africa 25/11/2009 OER in Developing Countries Partnerships for Effective Collaboration
  • Catherine Ngugi OER Africa 25/11/2009 OER in Developing Countries Partnerships for Effective Collaboration
  • OER Africa KeMU Policy Review and OER Workshop
  • OER Africa KeMU Policy Review and OER Workshop
  • MYL Introduction Overview of 10 minute presentation – the role that Tufts does and will play in efforts to increase access to rich resources throughout Africa and beyond
  • Tufts faculty member Pearl Robinson, Professor of Political Science, started in the early 2000s (~2003-4) to work with faculty in East Africa for curriculum co-development in political science – she now works with University of Ghana Jeff Griffiths, Associate Professor of Public Health and Family Medicine, began working with partners in East Africa in mid 2000s (2005-6) and continues working with these partners
  • OER Africa KeMU Policy Review and OER Workshop
  • 25/11/2009 Catherine Ngugi OER Africa OER in Developing Countries Partnerships for Effective Collaboration
  • 25/11/2009 Catherine Ngugi OER Africa OER in Developing Countries Partnerships for Effective Collaboration
  • Catherine Ngugi OER Africa 25/11/2009 OER in Developing Countries Partnerships for Effective Collaboration
  • Catherine Ngugi OER Africa 25/11/2009 OER in Developing Countries Partnerships for Effective Collaboration
  • OER Africa KeMU Policy Review and OER Workshop
  • Future workshops were run by Ghanaians.
  • OER Africa KeMU Policy Review and OER Workshop
  • o     Intra- and inter-institutional collaboration   Technical infrastructure Enables engagement, interaction, integration across academic institutions, hospitals, secondary clinics, students, faculty, staff, community Supports and enhances education in health sciences – tools for active learning Manages knowledge Supports administrative functions through digital repository, content reuse, robust UMLS indexing and search, links to library literature adjacent to teaching and learning i.e. curriculum mapping, course evaluation, evaluation of students in clinical settings, tools to track clinical experiences
  • Tufts has partnerships with institutions around the world Tufts network of TMC and affiliated hospitals, vet clinics throughout New England New York Hawaii EACC CMC Saudi Arabia All use TUSK for integrated access to medical education resources
  • Tufts network throughout New England exemplifies the ‘hub and spoke’ model Tufts in Boston is main hub, serving dozens of affiliated hospitals and clinics, in addition to Cummings School of Vet Med TUSM TUSDM Public Health programs And affiliated hospitals / clinics
  • CMC and its network of 200+ secondary hospitals
  • CMC is eager to share and co-develop content – conversations with UNairobi RESPOND will benefit from EACC – hub and spoke to serve Congolese centers
  • Mobile TUSK and USAID RESPOND … this learning system is one of the innovations that Tufts University brings to USAID’s new Emerging Pandemic Threats program. Through our Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, Tufts is a key partner in the 5-year USAID RESPOND initiative to address global academic and field training needs to effectively respond to emergent infectious diseases. Collaborations across Tufts: Cummings vet, med public health, Feinstein International Center, CELT Collaborations across country: DAI, U Minnesota Across the world: Congo Basin, Southeast Asia, Gangetic Plain, Amazon Basin Image courtesy of the CIA World Fact Book
  • Implications for content sharing, medical education, K-12 / primary and secondary education, open source, LMS, etc. implications
  • OER Africa KeMU Policy Review and OER Workshop
  • 25/11/2009 Catherine Ngugi OER Africa OER in Developing Countries Partnerships for Effective Collaboration

Health OER: Harnessing OER to Develop Health Education Systems in Africa Presentation Transcript

  • 1. Health OER Harnessing OER to Develop Health Education Systems in Africa OCWC Annual Conference Hanoi, Vietnam 5 - 7 May 2010
  • 2. INTRODUCING OER AFRICA
  • 3. Who we are
    • OER Africa is a Saide endeavour, headquartered in Nairobi and established to play a leading role in driving the development and use of OER in Africa.
    • OER Africa brings together all of Saide ’s OER-related activities under a common conceptual framework.
    • Seed funding from the William & Flora Hewlett Foundation and a wide variety of projects and partnerships running across Africa.
  • 4. Why do we exist?
    • OER Africa believes that OER can positively support development and capacity of higher education systems and institutions across Africa.
    • OER Africa is concerned that – if the concept and practice of OER evolves predominantly outside and for Africa – we will not be able to liberate its potential.
  • 5. OER Africa Domain Areas
    • Health
    • Agriculture
    • Foundation Courses
    • TE
  • 6. WHY?
    • Vibrant, sustainable African higher education institutions that play a critical role in building and sustaining African societies and economies, by producing the continent’s future intellectual leaders through free and open development and sharing of common intellectual capital.
    A Vision for Higher Education in Africa:
  • 7. U-M INTRODUCTION
  • 8. 2007
    • Dean Woolliscroft commits the U-M Medical School to publishing all of its pre-clinical materials as OER
        • Part of the vision to be a global medical school and a recognized innovator in medical education
    • Medical School and the School of Information collaborate on developing student-centered dScribe publishing process
    • All U-M health science deans pledge their support
    • Health OER planning grant submitted to Hewlett Foundation
  • 9. 2008
    • U-M President Mary Sue Coleman leads delegation to Ghana and South Africa (February and March)
    • Hewlett Foundation awards planning grant with additional support from Soros and FAIMER (March)
        • Health OER workshop in Ghana (May)
        • dScribe development and materials piloting at U-M
        • Grant writing trip in Africa (July)
    • Institute of Medicine meeting (September)
    • Hewlett awards “Design Phase” grant (Nov)
  • 10. INTRODUCING TUFTS & TUSK
  • 11. Tufts OER in Health-Africa
    • Curriculum Co-Development
    • TUSK E-Learning System
    • Christian Medical College, Vellore, India
    • USAID RESPOND
    • Open Source Efforts
  • 12. Curriculum Co-Development
    • Partners include:
    • University of Ghana
    • East Africa Curriculum Co-Development Consortium (EACC):
      • Makerere University School of Public Health, Uganda
      • University of Nairobi, Kenya
      • Kenya Methodist University, Kenya
      • Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Tanzania
  • 13. INTRODUCING http://www.oerafrica.org/Default.aspx?alias=www.oerafrica.org/healthproject 2009 “ Health OER Design Phase”
  • 14. Health OER 1
    • Partnership between KNUST, UG, UCW, UCT, UM & OER Africa
    • Objective was to bridge identified gaps
    • Materials produced to date range from videos to PDFs (boils and knives)
    • Results of collaboration include cross - institutional transfer of knowledge, skills and expertise
    • Growing the network as a next step
  • 15. Growing the Health OER Network
    • Objectives:
    • strengthen the intellectual and policy infrastructure within and between African institutions in order to grow a vibrant Health OER network.
    • systematically draw in more African and global participants to create, adapt, share and use OER to the benefit of health education in Africa.
    • develop models of collaboration and sustainability that can be replicated in other regions of the world.
  • 16. Requirements for OER Success?
    • Institutional integration – not a sideline activity!
    • HOW?
      • POLICY - IP, HR (remuneration, reward)
      • Needs targeted Creation, Adaptation and Use – improving pedagogy through proof of concept pilots
      • Support to existing networks – not duplicating / dissipating efforts
  • 17. Integrating OER
    • Initial OER Sensitization & Exploration
    • Policy Reviews towards a supportive institutional environment; (IP, HR – reward & remuneration)
    • Materials Audits
    • Proof of Concept Pilots in support of the reinvention of African higher education program curricula
    • Regular & ongoing communication / relationship-building
    • Aggregation & dissemination through OER online platform – www.oerafrica.org
  • 18. OER CONTENT DEVELOPMENT
  • 19. Institutional Workshops University of Ghana
  • 20. Production Workshop Agenda
    • Tailored to needs of individuals institutions
    • E.g., 1.5 days at University of Ghana
        • OER overview
        • OER lifecycle
        • Copyright analysis
        • Packaging and distribution formats
        • Open repositories (for inputs and storing works)
        • Action plan
  • 21. Aims
    • Focus on need-driven priorities within local curriculum
    • Share learning materials globally, leading to local adaptation and enhancement and re-publishing (a virtuous circle)
  • 22. Tools and Templates
    • Goal is to keep technology simple
        • HTML-based templates for case studies (for online and print distribution)
        • Video with inexpensive handheld cameras
        • Lecture capture with Camtasia
  • 23. Intra-institutional Collaboration
    • Connecting with local resources
        • KNUST Department of Communication Design
        • National service participants
  • 24. Dr. Engleberg’s Sabbatical in Ghana
  • 25. RESULTS
  • 26.  
  • 27.  
  • 28.  
  • 29. What Is TUSK?
    • Enterprise system for institutions and regions
    • Designed for health sciences
    • Moving to open source and non-health areas
    • Accessible from mobile devices
  • 30. Partnerships
  • 31. Tufts, Boston Tufts University ‘ hub and spoke ’ model
  • 32. CMC, Vellore — hub Christian Medical College, Vellore, India ‘ hub and spoke ’ model CMC, Vellore, India Network of 200+ mission hospitals
  • 33. South-South Collaboration and Co-Development
  • 34. and USAID RESPOND
  • 35. Moving Forward Open Source Consortium and University of Indiana: Open MRS and
  • 36. The OER Africa Website
  • 37. Networking
    • Join the network
      • Sign the Declaration
      • Share content
      • Develop an OER Marketplace
      • Join discussions
      • Build relationships
  • 38. Q & A
    • Are the network design and services generalizable to other disciplines?
    • If so, how should we work together to build and scale the services across communities?
    • What’s missing from the network?
  • 39. Thank you Catherine Ngugi Neil Butcher [email_address] [email_address] Ted Hanss Mary Lee [email_address] [email_address]