Go Beyond the Classroom Enriching Scholarship 6 May 2010 Image from Andrew Scott  http://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewscott...
<ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><...
 
“ Openly Licensed?” comes from the definition...
OER Definition : “ Open educational resources are educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone...
OER Definition : “ Open educational resources are  educational materials  and resources offered freely and openly for anyo...
What types of materials can become  OER ? <ul><li>Classroom Materials: including lecture    presentations, reading lists, ...
The difference between: Open Course Ware (OCW)  and  OER .
MIT OpenCourseWare, http://ocw.mit.edu/
OCW  focuses on sharing open content that is developed specifically to instruct a course  OER  includes any educational co...
OCW // OER - overlap OER OCW OCW, single images, general campus lectures, image collections, singular learning modules, pa...
<ul><li>OER   are not: </li></ul><ul><li>eLearning or distance learning </li></ul><ul><li>Open Access </li></ul>
OA // OER - buddies OA OER free, permanent, full-text, online access to scientific and scholarly works openly licensed edu...
eLearning // OER - intersection OER eLearning intersection represents open, electronic, instructional resources
creativecommons  ( flickr)
More about licenses later... Open Licenses  make it all possible.
<ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><...
benefits of OER:  for faculty
benefits of OER:  for faculty recognition for their teaching publish and promote their resources connect with other collab...
benefits of OER:  for the university
benefits of OER:  for the university “ The mission of the University of Michigan is to serve the people of Michigan and th...
The mission of the University of Michigan is to   serve the people of   Michigan and the world through   preeminence in   ...
<ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><...
Our mission is to help faculty, students, and staff maximize the impact of their creative and academic work by making it o...
 
 
projects Open.Michigan Projects Page, https://open.umich.edu/connect/projects.php
OER Open.Michigan Projects Page, https://open.umich.edu/connect/projects.php
OER-Contributing faculty from: Engineering LSA Public Policy Dentistry Education Information Medicine Nursing Public Healt...
What does  OER look like?
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
“ This is a really good presentation. Very clear and I like your examples and excel sheet calculations. Thank you for the ...
So, what makes these  OER ?
 
So, how do I create  OER ?
<ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><...
It's easiest to create open content from the start.
Start now  by making a  small change  in  how you create  your own content.
<ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><...
“ Open Licenses”
There are many types...
Non-Software Licenses: Creative Commons GNU Free Documentation License Software Licenses: GPL Apache BSD
OER  *mostly* uses Creative Commons Licenses
Creative Commons
 
Creative Commons, http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Sharing_Creative_Works_14
Creative Commons: licenses
Public  Domain All Rights Reserved Some rights reserved: a spectrum. least restrictive most restrictive
But...
OER Definition : “ Open educational resources are  educational materials  and resources offered freely and openly for anyo...
OER   Creative Commons: licenses X X
Some rights reserved: a spectrum for  OER least restrictive most restrictive Public  Domain All Rights Reserved X X X
What does this  mean for you?
Go Beyond the Classroom Enriching Scholarship 6 May 2010 Image from Andrew Scott  http://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewscott...
<ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><...
When possible, use only: Openly Licensed  (or  Public Domain ) Content
Where to find openly licensed or public domain media: https://open.umich.edu/share/use.php
<ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><...
BY: betsyjean79 ( flickr ) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en
add some extra information: : author name : link to content : license name : link to license https://open.umich.edu/share/...
BY: betsyjean79 ( flickr ) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en On  Slide
OER Let’s do it right from the start. CC: BY-SA Phil McElhinney ( flickr )  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/...
Lady Finger Learning about Orchids phalaenopsis  CC:BY  audreyjm529  (flickr)  http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/...
Additional Source Information Slide 3:  Janeway. Immunobiology : The Immune System in Health and Disease. Current Biology ...
<ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><...
 
what if you want to make your  previous work available as OER?
what types of third-party images  might you have in your content?
Artwork these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
Illustrations: Cartoons these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
Illustrations: Chemical Representations
Drawings and Diagrams some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
Charts
Graphs
Graphics some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
Scientific Images
Ads, CD/Book/Movie Covers, Screenshots some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
Photographs some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
Text: Quotes, Passages, Poems The Mesh We have come to the cross-roads And I must either leave or come with you. I lingere...
what should you do with them?
possible actions :: retain  : keep the content because it is licensed under an Open license or is in the public domain :: ...
What action would you recommend for this object & why? <ul><li>Retain: Ineligible for copyright </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This...
U.S. copyright law does not apply to:  - Facts - Information - Data - Statistics - Obvious means of selecting, arranging, ...
U.S. copyright law does not apply to:  - Opinions - Ideas - Concepts - Principles - Theories - Hypothesis - Algorithms - R...
- Citations - References  - Quotations - Brief excerpts - Works created by an employee of the federal government as part o...
What action would you recommend for this object & why? <ul><li>Retain: Public Domain </li></ul><ul><li>Federal government ...
What action(s) would you recommend for these? these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use Replace or...
<ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><...
Pop quiz
What is the distinction between OER and free educational resources? <ul><li>You do not have to pay for free resources and ...
What is the relationship between eLearning and OER? <ul><li>They are names for the same thing: free online learning resour...
What does CC BY NC SA stand for? <ul><li>CC = Creative Commons  </li></ul><ul><li>BY = Attribution  </li></ul><ul><li>NC =...
Which represent the types of intellectual property? (Hint: There are 4.) <ul><li>Derivative works </li></ul><ul><li>Patent...
What are the three areas of consideration in the reviewing materials before publishing them as OER?  <ul><li>Copyright </l...
main policy considerations :: copyright  : U.S. law grants limited exclusive rights to authors of creative works :: p riva...
Speaking of copyright…
What is the origin U.S. copyright (hint: think legal documents)?  A. The U.S. Copyright Act of 1976 B. The Progress Clause...
What is the purpose of copyright?  <ul><li>“ To promote the progress of Science and Useful Arts, by securing for limited t...
True or False: In order for an object to qualify for copyright protection, it must be marked with a (C) symbol False. See:...
True or false: A work must be published and registered in order to be granted copyright protection. False.
Copyright rewards which of the following: <ul><li>Effort </li></ul><ul><li>Ingenuity  </li></ul><ul><li>Creative expressio...
True or False:  Any presentation slides that I would use in the classroom I could also publish as OER simply by posting th...
Now on to some scenarios
For the next four questions, you are a professor who is creating an open educational resource. You are searching for image...
A scanned photo from a textbook that says &quot;© 1980 All rights reserved&quot; on the cover page <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><...
A free, online article with no copyright notification (©) <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul><ul><li>It depends </...
An instructional video with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial license <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></...
A set of presentation slides developed by a colleague at your institution. <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul><ul>...
end of quiz
closing remarks
It's easiest to create open content from the start.
By making a  small change  in  how you create  your own content…
… and licensing your creations as  OER …
… you can gain  recognition ,  publish and promote  your research and teaching materials,  connect  with collaborators, an...
Questions? open.michigan@umich.edu  open.umich.edu
Find more material online at http://open.umich.edu/share/ http://open.umich.edu/wiki/ Many slides in this presentation wer...
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Go Beyond the Classroom: Share your Work with the world through Open Educational Resources

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This presentation by the Open.Michigan Team provides an introduction to Open Educational Resources (OER), shows several examples, and provides an overview for the Open.Michigan initiative. The presentation also demonstrates the steps involved in creating and sharing your own educational materials as OER.

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  • Here’s a quick look at some of the things my colleagues are going to cover today. We’re going to start out by defining OER and showing you some examples. Then we’re going to talk about the Open.Michigan initiative, which supports the production and publication of OER on our campus. Then we’re going to switch to a more demonstration mode so you can learn what steps are involved in creating and sharing your own educational materials as OER.
  • So, let’s start out with a definition. OER are Open Educational Resources, also known as “Openly Licensed Educational Materials”
  • You’ll be hearing the term “openly licensed” a lot in this presentation
  • as in the OER definition from wikipedia.
  • The key point here is that OER goes beyond just sharing materials. By openly licensing these materials it enables others to remix, repurpose, improve, and redistribute educational materials.
  • It is sometimes easiest to understand OER by comparing it to Open Course Ware.
  • Launched in 2001. MIT OCW is a large-scale, Web-based publication of MIT’s educational materials representing 33 academic disciplines and all five of MIT’s schools. Their collection now includes 1950 published courses.
  • So, OCW is generally packaged and presented as a course. OER can be a course, or can also be just a presentation or a paper or a bibliography or a website or an image collection. OER is any resource that is related to learning and has been openly licensed for others to share.
  • Another way to look at how the two relate is to think of OCW as a subset of OER Again, what that means is OER can include complete courses (including Open Course Ware) or it can be individual educational resources or content -- such as images, data, learning modules, or even software
  • OER is also different from eLearning or distance learning and Open Access. And the next slides explain this a bit further.
  • OA focuses on sharing educational content online, for free, but without a requiring the use of an Open license. The University of Michigan Library provides support for faculty who want to learn more about Open Access or wish to publish in Open Access journals or otherwise make their material available in an Open Access fashion. (Example: Directory of Open Access Journals http://www.doaj.org is a good example of Open Access publishing. ) OER shares some of the characteristics of Open Access but includes any type of educational content that is shared under an Open license
  • OER has some similarities with eLearning eLearning are instructional resources delivered on a computer or via the Internet that are not necessarily Openly licensed. OER materials are designed to be building blocks providing content for instructional purposes and are always Openly licensed
  • We like to share educational materials.
  • OK, so what are some of the benefits of OER?
  • If you haven’t looked at the U-M mission statement recently, it’s a good reminder of our goals as a university.
  • OER aligns with our mission as a university and is helping to fulfill our goal of creating and sharing knowledge, resources and research with the global learning community. We recently interviewed Paul Courant Dean of Libraries at U-M about the benefits of open. We’ll play that video for you now, which also appears on our YouTube Channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XtUsffmHH0o
  • Launched in 2005, Open.Michigan started as a result of a collaboration between a few faculty, a few administrators, and a few students. After MIT received a round of funding from the Hewlett and Mellon foundations to launch their OpenCourseWare (OCW) initiative, collaborators at U-M (faculty, admins) started talking about how to do open courseware here. Some wanted to use the MIT model and get a bunch of funding, others were left wondering if there might be a completely different model, given the size of the curriculum and the associated cost. School of Information Associate Professor Joseph Hardin and worked with a number of graduate students to explore different models for clearing and publishing course materials.
  • The Open.Michigan website is the front door to U-M’s Open.Michigan initiative and provides information about a wide variety of open activities at U-M and beyond. Web address: http://open.umich.edu When you click on “Find”…
  • You’ll come to our Educational Resources page, which is the front door for the OER component of the Open.Michigan initiative. Web address: https://open.umich.edu/education/
  • In addition to providing a repository of OER resources for teaching and learning, Open.Michigan represents a growing portfolio of open initiatives and projects at U-M. The project page on our website features a wealth of links to other OER related projects across the U-M community. Including archives and repositories, such as the U-M Library’s DeepBlue and Hathi Trust. And also pointers to openly shared data collections and open source software.
  • But, today we’re focusing on how to share teaching and learning materials as OER.
  • So, who is participating? As of May 2010, faculty from these departments have shared their learning materials on Open.Michigan
  • Basically anything created by faculty, staff, or students can become OER.
  • OERs can be a complete course…
  • Or just a lecture… like today’s presentation, which we’ll post on Slideshare
  • Or a video
  • or a website
  • or an image collection
  • or an instructional module
  • or even a textbook Example #1 Chemical Engineering Open wiki Textbook by Peter Woolf This project is a collaboration between the faculty and students of the University of Michigan chemical engineering department. It is a student-contributed open-source text covering the materials used at Michigan in a senior level course. The goal of this project is to provide the greater chemical engineering community with a useful, relevant, high quality, and free resource describing chemical process control and modeling. Initial construction of this resource began in Fall 2006, and will continue in future years with other groups of students. Example #2 High Performance Computing Open Textbook by Charles Severance High Performance Computing, originally published by O’Reilly–but out of print since 2003, has been republished on Connexions. Book author Charles Severance, with his editor Mike Loukides, worked with O’Reilly to release the book under a CC-BY license, then coordinated with the Connexions staff to republish it. The book is now freely available on the web and in PDF. Printed copies are available on-demand for the cost of printing and shipping. The CC-BY license also makes it possible for the entire contents of the book to be remixed and republished by anyone.
  • We gather and monitor feedback from our users.
  • We get feedback from our users.
  • Selecting a license and displaying it on your work is the first step in creating OER.
  • When creating new learning materials… Start now by making a small change in how you create your own content.
  • You can find many collections of open content online ready for reuse, including images, artwork, audio, video, and course materials (including complete courses). Our wiki has a collection of links to help you get started.
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  • Can we delete this one?
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  • 01/26/10 01/26/10 Incorrect. The copyright symbol © indicates that the work is copyrighted. The All Rights Reserved indicates that the author is retaining all of the rights of their copyright. This is in contrast to the Some Rights Reserved option offered by the Creative Commons License suite. Incorrect. This is a common mistake. Although the copyright notice says &amp;quot;All Rights Reserved,&amp;quot; the copyright holder can only reserve the rights to which they are entitled. There may be an opportunity to make a fair use. Fair use depends on nature of original, purpose of the use, amount of original, affect on the market of the original. There are many creators of OER who use third-party copyrighted content such as a photo in their OER only when they have expressed permission from the author to use the image or the image is in the public domain or labeled with an open license such as Creative Commons. This is a conservative option for OER creator, but it is not the only correct (i.e. law-abiding) option. C. Correct. Copyright is very nuanced. Although the book says © 1980, perhaps the photo itself was taken in 1900, which means the copyright has expired. When copyright expires, a work is said to become part of the public domain and is therefore free for use, redistribution, and adaptation. This means that the individual photo is no longer copyrighted even though the other contents of the book may be. Another possible scenario may be that the photo is from 1980 but it is an X-Ray of someone&apos;s chest. Copyright protects original expression. In many countries (e.g. the United States, Ghana), scientific facts, data, or ideas are not protected by copyright. In these countries, copyright law permits free use of images that are factual and accurate. For example, a standard X-ray is a scientific image with no original expression - there is no special lighting, angles, colors, or other elements of creative expression added by the person who took the X-ray. In countries where scientific facts, images, and data are not eligible for copyright, then someone in that country could keep the image of the X-ray in their OER. The same could be said of basic charts or graphs which represent an obvious way of selecting, arranging, and organization facts and data. A third possible scenario is that the image is cartoon with a lot of originality both the words and drawings. This would be original expression and therefore protected by copyright. In this case, you could not use the image. Since the category of what&apos;s eligible for copyright, particularly in regard to data and scientific images differs across countries, OER producers should refrain from doing this copyright analysis unless that have a deep understanding of copyright law in their country and/or are able to consult copyright attorneys trained in their jurisdiction. For more information about the copyright laws in your country, go to the World Intellectual Property Organization website.
  • 01/26/10 01/26/10 Incorrect. Free does not necessarily mean open. Correct. In most countries, copyright is granted to creators automatically even if they do not include a © symbol. If there is no © symbol and no open license (e.g. Creative Commons), then the work is considered to be All Rights Reserved and you cannot distribute the article (e.g. PDF version) with your OER. You can, however, include a citation with a link to it so that your reader can view the article on the original site. Under fair practice or fair use, you could also include a short excerpt from the article. Maybe, but try again. Based on this limited information, there is a better answer.
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  • 01/26/10 01/26/10 Incorrect. Even though you may know the author or be employed at the same institution, you must get permission from the copyright owner in order to use the work. Incorrect Correct! If your colleague has licensed the presentation under Creative Commons or dedicated it to the public domain, then you may use it. If the presentation is not marked with any copyright or license information, then it is copyrighted. Since the author is your colleague though, it should be easier to contact them and his or her permission than seeking permission from a stranger at a distance organization or institution. It is worth noting, however, that depending on your institution&apos;s copyright policy, the university may own the copyright or the faculty may own the copyright. In the case where the faculty member owns the copyright, you need only seek permission from the creator. In the case where the university owns the copyright, you must seek permission from a representative of the university. For example, if the presentation is about immunology, then you could seek permission from an administrator in the medical school who would have the authority to grant you permission on behalf of the university. In those cases, it is also good practice to seek permission from the author as a sign of goodwill. Although this is not required since the author does not own the copyright, it is a simple gesture of goodwill.
  • When creating new learning materials… Start now by making a small change in how you create your own content.
  • Go Beyond the Classroom: Share your Work with the world through Open Educational Resources

    1. 1. Go Beyond the Classroom Enriching Scholarship 6 May 2010 Image from Andrew Scott http://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewscott/2330212397/ under a Creative Commons license: BY-NC-SA http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en Copyright © 2010 The Regents of the University of Michigan Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Share your work with the world through Open Educational Resources
    2. 2. <ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>cite </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>share </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>group activity </li></ul>
    3. 4. “ Openly Licensed?” comes from the definition...
    4. 5. OER Definition : “ Open educational resources are educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and − under some licenses − to remix, improve and redistribute.” Wikipedia: OER, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_educational_resources
    5. 6. OER Definition : “ Open educational resources are educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and under some licenses to remix, improve and redistribute.” Wikipedia: OER, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_educational_resources
    6. 7. What types of materials can become OER ? <ul><li>Classroom Materials: including lecture presentations, reading lists, syllabi, etc. </li></ul><ul><li>Websites </li></ul><ul><li>Videos </li></ul><ul><li>Image Collections </li></ul><ul><li>Software </li></ul>
    7. 8. The difference between: Open Course Ware (OCW) and OER .
    8. 9. MIT OpenCourseWare, http://ocw.mit.edu/
    9. 10. OCW focuses on sharing open content that is developed specifically to instruct a course OER includes any educational content that is shared under an open license, whether or not it is a part of a course
    10. 11. OCW // OER - overlap OER OCW OCW, single images, general campus lectures, image collections, singular learning modules, paper or article syllabi, lecture notes, presentation slides, assignments, lecture videos - all related to a course
    11. 12. <ul><li>OER are not: </li></ul><ul><li>eLearning or distance learning </li></ul><ul><li>Open Access </li></ul>
    12. 13. OA // OER - buddies OA OER free, permanent, full-text, online access to scientific and scholarly works openly licensed educational content
    13. 14. eLearning // OER - intersection OER eLearning intersection represents open, electronic, instructional resources
    14. 15. creativecommons ( flickr)
    15. 16. More about licenses later... Open Licenses make it all possible.
    16. 17. <ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>cite </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>share </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>group activity </li></ul>
    17. 18. benefits of OER: for faculty
    18. 19. benefits of OER: for faculty recognition for their teaching publish and promote their resources connect with other collaborators extend their reach and visibility
    19. 20. benefits of OER: for the university
    20. 21. benefits of OER: for the university “ The mission of the University of Michigan is to serve the people of Michigan and the world through preeminence in creating, communicating, preserving and applying knowledge, art, and academic values, and in developing leaders and citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future.” University of Michigan Mission Statement, http://www.accreditation.umich.edu/mission/
    21. 22. The mission of the University of Michigan is to serve the people of Michigan and the world through preeminence in creating, communicating, preserving and applying knowledge , art, and academic values, and in developing leaders and citizens who will challenge the present and enrich the future. benefits of OER: for the university University of Michigan Mission Statement, http://www.accreditation.umich.edu/mission/
    22. 23. <ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>cite </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>share </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>group activity </li></ul>
    23. 24. Our mission is to help faculty, students, and staff maximize the impact of their creative and academic work by making it open and accessible to the public.
    24. 27. projects Open.Michigan Projects Page, https://open.umich.edu/connect/projects.php
    25. 28. OER Open.Michigan Projects Page, https://open.umich.edu/connect/projects.php
    26. 29. OER-Contributing faculty from: Engineering LSA Public Policy Dentistry Education Information Medicine Nursing Public Health Architecture
    27. 30. What does OER look like?
    28. 39. “ This is a really good presentation. Very clear and I like your examples and excel sheet calculations. Thank you for the great lecture.” “ My teacher did not explain as clear as you did.” “ Thanks for this video. Very well explained and with examples.”
    29. 40. So, what makes these OER ?
    30. 42. So, how do I create OER ?
    31. 43. <ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>cite </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>share </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>group activity </li></ul>
    32. 44. It's easiest to create open content from the start.
    33. 45. Start now by making a small change in how you create your own content.
    34. 46. <ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>cite </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>share </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>group activity </li></ul>
    35. 47. “ Open Licenses”
    36. 48. There are many types...
    37. 49. Non-Software Licenses: Creative Commons GNU Free Documentation License Software Licenses: GPL Apache BSD
    38. 50. OER *mostly* uses Creative Commons Licenses
    39. 51. Creative Commons
    40. 53. Creative Commons, http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Sharing_Creative_Works_14
    41. 54. Creative Commons: licenses
    42. 55. Public Domain All Rights Reserved Some rights reserved: a spectrum. least restrictive most restrictive
    43. 56. But...
    44. 57. OER Definition : “ Open educational resources are educational materials and resources offered freely and openly for anyone to use and under some licenses to re-mix, improve and redistribute.” Wikipedia: OER, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Open_educational_resources
    45. 58. OER Creative Commons: licenses X X
    46. 59. Some rights reserved: a spectrum for OER least restrictive most restrictive Public Domain All Rights Reserved X X X
    47. 60. What does this mean for you?
    48. 61. Go Beyond the Classroom Enriching Scholarship 6 May 2010 Image from Andrew Scott http://www.flickr.com/photos/andrewscott/2330212397/ under a Creative Commons license: BY-NC-SA http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en Copyright © 2010 The Regents of the University of Michigan Except where otherwise noted, this work is available under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License. Share your work with the world through Open Educational Resources
    49. 62. <ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>cite </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>share </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>group activity </li></ul>
    50. 63. When possible, use only: Openly Licensed (or Public Domain ) Content
    51. 64. Where to find openly licensed or public domain media: https://open.umich.edu/share/use.php
    52. 65. <ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>cite </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>share </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>group activity </li></ul>
    53. 66. BY: betsyjean79 ( flickr ) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en
    54. 67. add some extra information: : author name : link to content : license name : link to license https://open.umich.edu/share/cite.php
    55. 68. BY: betsyjean79 ( flickr ) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/2.0/deed.en On Slide
    56. 69. OER Let’s do it right from the start. CC: BY-SA Phil McElhinney ( flickr ) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ On Slide
    57. 70. Lady Finger Learning about Orchids phalaenopsis CC:BY audreyjm529 (flickr) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ Phalaenopsis Lady Finger Orchid CC:BY aussiegall (flickr) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/ A Phalaenopsis hybrid A Phalaenopsis hybrid CC:BY-SA Zizonus (flickr) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ On Slide
    58. 71. Additional Source Information Slide 3: Janeway. Immunobiology : The Immune System in Health and Disease. Current Biology Ltd./Garland Publishing, Inc. 1997 Slide 4: Spinach is Good” Center for Disease Control; Life Magazine. January 17, 1938; rejon, http://openclipart.org/media/files/rejon/11221 Slide 5: Goody Two Shoes - McLoughlin Bro's (New-York) 1888 Slide 6: Jot Powers, “Bounty Hunter”, Wikimedia Commons, http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Bounty_hunter_2.JPG , CC: BY-SA 2.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.0/ EXAMPLE At the end of the presentation
    59. 72. <ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Cite </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>share </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>group activity </li></ul>
    60. 74. what if you want to make your previous work available as OER?
    61. 75. what types of third-party images might you have in your content?
    62. 76. Artwork these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
    63. 77. Illustrations: Cartoons these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
    64. 78. Illustrations: Chemical Representations
    65. 79. Drawings and Diagrams some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
    66. 80. Charts
    67. 81. Graphs
    68. 82. Graphics some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
    69. 83. Scientific Images
    70. 84. Ads, CD/Book/Movie Covers, Screenshots some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
    71. 85. Photographs some of these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
    72. 86. Text: Quotes, Passages, Poems The Mesh We have come to the cross-roads And I must either leave or come with you. I lingered over the choice But in the darkness of my doubts You lifted the lamp of love And I saw in your face The road that I should take. - Kwesi Brew some of these excerpts used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use
    73. 87. what should you do with them?
    74. 88. possible actions :: retain : keep the content because it is licensed under an Open license or is in the public domain :: replace : you may want to replace content that is not Openly licensed (and thus not shareable) :: remove : you may need to remove content due to privacy, endorsement or copyright concerns
    75. 89. What action would you recommend for this object & why? <ul><li>Retain: Ineligible for copyright </li></ul><ul><ul><li>This is a basic graph. Data is not copyrightable. This is a basic representation of data containing no creative expression. If you and I both had this data, we could generate the same graph easily. </li></ul></ul>
    76. 90. U.S. copyright law does not apply to: - Facts - Information - Data - Statistics - Obvious means of selecting, arranging, and organizing facts, data and information - alphabetical, geographical, order of importance or relevance, natural sequence (time, seasonal)
    77. 91. U.S. copyright law does not apply to: - Opinions - Ideas - Concepts - Principles - Theories - Hypothesis - Algorithms - Recipes - Descriptions and Representations of a process, procedure, function, system, method of operation
    78. 92. - Citations - References - Quotations - Brief excerpts - Works created by an employee of the federal government as part of official duties U.S. copyright law does not apply to:
    79. 93. What action would you recommend for this object & why? <ul><li>Retain: Public Domain </li></ul><ul><li>Federal government documents are in the public domain. </li></ul>
    80. 94. What action(s) would you recommend for these? these images used under section 107, U.S. copyright law: fair use Replace or Remove
    81. 95. <ul><li>what is OER? </li></ul><ul><li>why OER? </li></ul><ul><li>open.michigan </li></ul><ul><li>generate OER </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>license </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>use </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>cite </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>share </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>group activity </li></ul>
    82. 96. Pop quiz
    83. 97. What is the distinction between OER and free educational resources? <ul><li>You do not have to pay for free resources and you may have to pay for open resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Open resources are available only online and free resources can be electronic or paper. </li></ul><ul><li>Open resources are free resources but free resources are not necessarily open resources. </li></ul><ul><li>There is no difference between the two. </li></ul>
    84. 98. What is the relationship between eLearning and OER? <ul><li>They are names for the same thing: free online learning resources. </li></ul><ul><li>All OER are eLearning resources but not all eLearning resources are OER. </li></ul><ul><li>OER is openly licensed and eLearning resources may or may not be openly licensed. </li></ul>
    85. 99. What does CC BY NC SA stand for? <ul><li>CC = Creative Commons </li></ul><ul><li>BY = Attribution </li></ul><ul><li>NC = Noncommercial </li></ul><ul><li>SA = Share Alike </li></ul>
    86. 100. Which represent the types of intellectual property? (Hint: There are 4.) <ul><li>Derivative works </li></ul><ul><li>Patent </li></ul><ul><li>Trade secret </li></ul><ul><li>Contracts </li></ul><ul><li>Torts </li></ul><ul><li>Copyright </li></ul><ul><li>Translation </li></ul><ul><li>Encryption </li></ul><ul><li>Trademark </li></ul>
    87. 101. What are the three areas of consideration in the reviewing materials before publishing them as OER? <ul><li>Copyright </li></ul><ul><li>Privacy </li></ul><ul><li>Endorsement </li></ul>
    88. 102. main policy considerations :: copyright : U.S. law grants limited exclusive rights to authors of creative works :: p rivacy : the protection of patient and student privacy :: endorsement : avoiding the appearance of endorsing a 3 rd party
    89. 103. Speaking of copyright…
    90. 104. What is the origin U.S. copyright (hint: think legal documents)? A. The U.S. Copyright Act of 1976 B. The Progress Clause of the U.S. Constitution C. The Commerce Clause of the U.S. Constitution D. The Magna Carta E. The Declaration of Independence
    91. 105. What is the purpose of copyright? <ul><li>“ To promote the progress of Science and Useful Arts, by securing for limited times to authors and inventors the exclusive right to their respective writings and discoveries.” U.S. Constitution Article I, Section 8, Clause 8 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Goal: To advance knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How: Exclusive rights on creative works for limited times </li></ul></ul>
    92. 106. True or False: In order for an object to qualify for copyright protection, it must be marked with a (C) symbol False. See: The Berne Convention Implementation Act of 1988 (BCIA).
    93. 107. True or false: A work must be published and registered in order to be granted copyright protection. False.
    94. 108. Copyright rewards which of the following: <ul><li>Effort </li></ul><ul><li>Ingenuity </li></ul><ul><li>Creative expression </li></ul><ul><li>Uniqueness </li></ul><ul><li>All </li></ul>See Supreme Court case: Feist v. Rural (1991)
    95. 109. True or False: Any presentation slides that I would use in the classroom I could also publish as OER simply by posting them online. False Instructors often have content created by others in their lecture slides: scanned images from textbooks, images that they found on Google images, or slides that were created by a faculty member who taught the course during a previous semester. This is copyrighted content that you can use in the classroom but you cannot publish as OER. In order for you to publish your lecture materials as OER, you will have to review them for copyright, privacy, and endorsement issues. You must also add add open license such as Creative Commons.
    96. 110. Now on to some scenarios
    97. 111. For the next four questions, you are a professor who is creating an open educational resource. You are searching for images, articles, and presentations that you can include in your program. You come across the following educational materials. Can you use them in your OER?
    98. 112. A scanned photo from a textbook that says &quot;© 1980 All rights reserved&quot; on the cover page <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul><ul><li>It depends </li></ul>See the notes page for this slide for a detailed explanation
    99. 113. A free, online article with no copyright notification (©) <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul><ul><li>It depends </li></ul>See the notes page for this slide for a detailed explanation
    100. 114. An instructional video with a Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial license <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul><ul><li>It depends </li></ul>The Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial (CC BY NC) license is one of several Creative Commons licenses that may be attached to OER. This means that you can include it in your OER as long as you credit the author, do not use it for commercial purposes, and link back to the CC BY NC license.
    101. 115. A set of presentation slides developed by a colleague at your institution. <ul><li>Yes </li></ul><ul><li>No </li></ul><ul><li>It depends </li></ul>See the notes page for this slide for a detailed explanation
    102. 116. end of quiz
    103. 117. closing remarks
    104. 118. It's easiest to create open content from the start.
    105. 119. By making a small change in how you create your own content…
    106. 120. … and licensing your creations as OER …
    107. 121. … you can gain recognition , publish and promote your research and teaching materials, connect with collaborators, and preserve and apply knowledge .
    108. 122. Questions? open.michigan@umich.edu open.umich.edu
    109. 123. Find more material online at http://open.umich.edu/share/ http://open.umich.edu/wiki/ Many slides in this presentation were produced in collaboration with Garin Fons, Pieter Kleymeer, Kathleen Ludewig, Greg Grossmeier, and Susan Topol.
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