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Should The Electoral College Be Abolished
 

Should The Electoral College Be Abolished

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    Should The Electoral College Be Abolished Should The Electoral College Be Abolished Presentation Transcript

    • Should the Electoral College be Abolished? By: Dalton Jacobs and Michael Heda
    • America Votes Americans can start voting at the age of 18. The presidential election is every four years on the Tuesday after the second Monday in November.
    • How the Electoral College Works!
      • In the Electoral College system, each state gets a certain number of electors based off their population size. An elector is a person that goes and makes an official vote for their states decision in the election. For example, California has 55 and Wyoming has three electors. Each delegate is like one vote. There are 538 total delegates. A candidate needs 270 delegates to win the election.
    • ELECTORAL COLLEGE The number of delegates are distributed according to the population in each state
    • No, the Electoral College should not be abolished.
      • A single vote matters more in an Electoral College system than popular vote system.
      • Little states matter more.
      • No national recount necessary
      • The whole country should decide who the president should be, not a big metropolitan area deciding the entire election.
      • Abolishing the Electoral College system goes against the constitution.
      • Abolishing the Electoral College could give the states less power against the federal government.
    • A single vote matters more in an Electoral College system than popular vote system.
      • In a popular vote system, one person’s vote is not as important as a person’s vote in an Electoral College system. In a popular vote, a single vote is mixed with hundreds of millions of people in the country. In an Electoral College system, a single vote is mixed with between about one million people to about thirty-five million people in each state.
    • In an Electoral College system, little states matter more.
      • There are many little states in the country. In an Electoral College system, if the candidate wins all the little states they can win the election. In a popular vote system, there are not enough people in the little states to make a big enough difference in the election. If a candidate wins some big states and loses all the little states, he or she will probably not have enough delegates to win.
    • In an Electoral College system, no national recount is necessary.
      • With the Electoral College system, there cannot be a national recount. The votes are counted stately, where as in the popular vote system, the votes are counted nationally. If a recount is necessary in the Electoral College system, it would only be for the states that were very close or a dispute came up during the election. In a popular vote system, a close election would need a recount of the whole country.
    • The whole country should decide who the president should be, not a big metropolitan area deciding the entire election.
      • With the Electoral College, candidates are forced to campaign across the whole entire country, not only the large and popular areas of the country. In a popular vote, the candidate only has to win one large area to make a huge impact on the election. The Electoral College System helps even the process out.
    • Abolishing the Electoral College system goes against the constitution.
      • If the Electoral College system were abolished, that would mean going against what the Constitution says. In order to change the Constitution, two-thirds of both houses would need to agree. This could cause a huge national fight.
    • Abolishing the Electoral College could give the states less power against the federal government.
      • The states would lose some power if the Electoral College were eliminated. The Electoral College helps prevent a strong person from trying to use popular support to get more power and become more like a dictator.
    • Yes, the Electoral College should be abolished and be replaced by the popular vote system
      • An elector of a state can vote against the states decision.
      • The candidate gets all the electoral votes no matter how many votes they win by in each state.
      • A candidate can get the most popular votes and still lose the election.
      • Some people’s vote matter more than others.
      • Candidates focus more on “battleground” states and less on states they know they are going to win or lose.
      • Small states matter more than they should.
      • With Electoral College system, the winner of the election could be decided before west coast votes.
    • An elector of a state can vote against the states decision.
      • Even though an elector is supposed to vote for who the states popular vote decided, sometimes the electors do not. For example, seven times in the past century an elector has voted against the states decision. Sometimes the elector can be bribed.
    • The candidate gets all the electoral votes no matter how many votes they win by in each state.
      • Every state has a certain number of electoral votes. If a candidate wins the state, even if it is by one vote, the candidate who got the extra vote wins all the delegates. This is not fair that the person who can win by only one vote can get all the delegates.
    • A candidate can get the most popular votes and still lose the election.
      • A candidate can with the national popular vote, and still lose the election. For example, in 2000 Al Gore beat George Bush in the popular vote but lost the Electoral College 271 to 266. Resulting in Bush becoming president.
    • Some people’s vote matter more than others.
      • In a small state like Montana, the votes matter a lot more than a vote in California or New York. This is not fair because nobody wants his or her vote to count less than someone else's. A vote in Montana counts more than a vote in California because Montana has a smaller population, so one vote is put with less people.
    • Candidates focus more on “battleground” states and less on states they know they are going to win or lose.
      • A candidate campaigning for an election, will not waste their money campaigning in a state they know they will win or cannot win. If a candidate goes to states they know they will win or lose for too long, they might not have enough money for the states that they need to campaign in.
    • Small states matter more than they should.
      • With the Electoral College, smaller states control most of the election. This is not fair to the other states. With a candidate winning all the small states and one big state, he wins the election. Whereas, under the popular vote, the candidate would not have enough votes.
    • With Electoral College system, the winner of the election could be decided before west coast votes.
      • After the east coast votes are in, the candidate could have enough delegates to have won the election. That means that the millions of people’s votes in the west coast would not matter.
    • Works Cited
      • &quot;USA ELECTORAL VOTES.&quot; Map. worldatlas.com . 19 Mar. 2009 <http://www.ask.com/ fr?q=should+the+electoral+college+be+abolished&desturi=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.worldatlas.com%2Fwebimage%2Fc ountrys%2Fnamerica%2Fusstates%2Felectorl.htm&fm=i&ac=34&ftURI=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ask.com%2Ffr%3Fq%3Dsho uld%2Bthe%2Belectoral%2Bcollege%2Bbe%2Babolished%26desturi%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.worldatlas.com%25 2Fwebimage%252Fcountrys%252Fnamerica%252Fusstates%252Felectorl.htm%26imagesrc%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fww w.worldatlas.com%252Fwebimage%252Fcountrys%252Fnamerica%252Fusstates%252Felectorl.gif%26thumbsrc%3Dht tp%253A%252F%252Fsp.ask.com%252Fsa%252Fi%252Fnw%252Felectoralcollege.jpg%26fn%3Delectorl.gif%26o%3D0% 26l%3Ddir%26f%3D2%26fm%3Di%26ftbURI%3Dhttp%253A%252F%252Fwww.ask.com%252Fweb%253Fq%253Dshould%252Bthe %252Belectoral%252Bcollege%252Bbe%252Babolished%2526o%253D0%2526l%253Ddir>.
      • &quot;The Pro's and Con's of the Electoral College System.&quot; The Electoral College . 20 Mar. 2009 <http://www.ask.com/ bar?q=should+the+electoral+college+be+abolished&page=1&qsrc=178&ab=1&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uselectionatl as.org%2FINFORMATION%2FINFORMATION%2Felectcollege_procon.php>.
      • &quot;Pros/Cons.&quot; Ask.com . 20 Mar. 2009 <http://www.ask.com/ bar?q=Pros+and+Cons+of+the+Electoral+College&page=1&qsrc=6&ab=2&u=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.seaford.k12.de.us% 2Fit%2Fspark%2F2005%2Fec%2FPROS-CONS.htm>.
      • Bonsor, Kevin. &quot;How the Electoral College Works.&quot; How Stuff Works . 14 Mar. 2009 <http://history.howstuffworks.com/american-history/electoral-college.htm>.
      • &quot;Electoral College: Pros & Cons.&quot; Academic Regis . 17 Mar. 2009 <http://academic.regis.edu/jriley/ 413electoral_college_pros-cons.htm>.