Showcasing the mining expertise of NortHERN ONTARIO
December 1, 2013 ■ Volume 10, Number 4

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com...
NEWS

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com

Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal I December 1, 2013

World’s largest cage headed to ...
4

NEWS	

December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

HERE’S WHY ONTARIO, CANADA

IS YOUR NEXT

BIG IDEA
Opportu...
SMSJ_Sept 2012_Pro_TH_PC

Mobile Equipment for
Safety and Productivity

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

NEWS	

Sudbury Mi...
6

December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

NEWS	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

Mining companies get behi...
www.sudburyminingsolutions.com

NEWS

Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal I December 1, 2013

Hoverbarge with 50-tonne payloa...
8

	

December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

Opinion

No endeavour for the...
www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

opinion	

Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013	

Women. What would we do w...
10

December 1, 2013 I Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal

RESEARCH

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com

College invites manufac...
RESEARCH	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

Charles Gagnon, corporate relations manager for Canadore
College, demonstrates...
12

December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

NEWS	

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New industrial park home...
NEWS	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	
“Despite the slowdown in the exploration industry, we’ve seen growth every
year – e...
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December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

NEWS	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

“An energy audit helped ...
NEWS	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

KGHM begins site preparation
for Victoria Project
n  xcavation of
E
1,892-metre
ex...
16

December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

INVEST IN DRYDEN
Northwestern Ontario’s Service Centre

Emerging...
TECHNOLOGY	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013	

Proximity detection sy...
18

December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

EXPLORATION	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

“Anyone who

tell...
TOTTEN mine	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013	

19

Team Totten rises...
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December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

NEWS	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com
www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

TOTTEN mine	

Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013	

... one team, one way...
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December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

TOTTEN mine	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

... Vale’s sixth ...
TOTTEN mine	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013	

Totten boasts 21st
Ce...
24

TOTTEN mine	

December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal	

www.sudburyminingsolutions.com	

Advanced technolo...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "R...
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Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "Resource Super Cycle " Glencore/Extrata - Vale business combination rumors

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Vale,announces opening of Totten Mine (first mine opened in Sudbury in 40 years!,Victoria Mine Update ,Robert Freidland "Resource Super Cycle " Glencore/Extrata - Vale business combination rumors

  1. 1. Showcasing the mining expertise of NortHERN ONTARIO December 1, 2013 ■ Volume 10, Number 4 www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Special Focus on Totten Mine: Pages 19 to 30 Futuristic control room in Totten Mine’s administration building includes a wall-to-wall array of computer screens and video monitors with flow charts and bar graphs providing a visual representation of mine operations. Vale Archive. Miningindustrialphotographer.com Vale celebrates Totten Mine startup n Mine of the future brimming with state-of-the-art technology BY ORM TOLLINSKY N It’s not every day that a new mine goes into production – not even in Sudbury, one of the world’s most important centres of mineral wealth – but, this month, Vale celebrates the official handover to operations at Totten Mine, 40 kilometres west of downtown Sudbury. Hailed as “a mine of the future” by Kelly Strong, vice-president of Ontario and UK operations, Totten is brimming with advanced technologies. “We’re very excited about this being our first new mine in over 40 years,” said Strong. “Totten demonstrates that we have this amazing resource under our feet here. Building Totten through some challenging economic times shows our commitment as a company to Sudbury. “One of the things you see in the mining industry is that the price cycle is shorter than the period of time it takes to complete a project,” noted Strong. “So, when we undertake to build these big capital projects, we have to understand that we’re going to go through a downturn at some point – either at the front end, the middle or the end, and we have to have the discipline to continue through from front to back.” That discipline hasn’t always been manifest. Inco, which was acquired by Vale in 2006, sunk two shafts at Totten beginning in 1966, but put the project on care and maintenance in 1972 and let it flood four years later. Vale announced plans to bring Totten into production soon after acquiring Inco in 2006. AMEC was awarded a contract to build a water treatment plant as a prelude to dewatering the underground workings. Existing surface infrastructure was demolished and in 2007 Cementation was hired to begin rehabilitating the 4,130-foot Number 2 shaft. It wasn’t always smooth sailing. Totten was supposed to cost $450 million and begin operating in the second quarter of 2011, but water ingress and other challenges encountered along the way delayed startup to December 2013 and the cost escalated to $760 million. See inside, Page 22 INSIDE WORLD’S LARGEST MINE CAGES ARE ON THE WAY TO INDONESIA FLSMIDTH AND SUDBURY’S STAINLESS STEEL TECHNOLOGY PARTNER UP.................................. 3 . CUTTING-EDGE INNOVATION CENTRE OPENS DOORS IN NORTH BAY ICAMP BOASTS LASER SCANNERS, POLYMER PRINTERS, INDUSTRIAL ROBOTS..........................10 SPECIAL REPORT ON WOMEN IN MINING: DIVERSITY TAKES HOLD MEET 12 WOMEN WHO ARE MAKING A DIFFERENCE IN THE MINING INDUSTRY....................38-47 w w w. s u d b u r y m i n i n g s o l u t i o n s . c o m Pub lica t io ns Mai l Agreement No. 40065411
  2. 2. NEWS www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal I December 1, 2013 World’s largest cage headed to Indonesia I Engineered by FLSmidth and manufactured by Stainless Steel Technology Freeport McMoRan didn’t want it to be a manual system, “so we designed it to be pneumatically operated with manual as backup,” said Brownlee. Wheel chocks used for stabilizing rail cars with heavy loads of supplies and equipment are also remotely engaged. The cage won’t leave if the wheel chocks aren’t in place. The cages are also equipped with Technogrid safety arrestors and FLSmidth Safety Catch Gear with impact buffers –backup safety equipment that is hardly ever used, said Brownlee. BY NORM TOLLINSKY FLSmidth and Sudbury fabricator Stainless Steel Technology are about to deliver two 300-man cages to Freeport McMoRan Copper Gold’s Grasberg complex in Indonesia. The two identical conveyances, one of which is a spare, are the largest and most technologically advanced cages in the world, according to Jim Brownlee, product manager for FLSmidth. Designed to operate in a sub-vertical shaft, or winze, the two-deck conveyances carry an 85,000-pound material payload and are designed to operate with a Blair multi-rope hoist. The cages are equipped with continuous load monitoring, LED lighting, a communication system, sensors for door position, a chairing solution and remotely operated wheel chocks to secure rail cars carrying supplies and equipment. Blair multi-rope hoisting was developed as a solution for very deep shafts in South Africa, but is gaining in popularity in Canada for other reasons, noted Brownlee. “In Canada, we have a requirement for safety dogs on conveyances. These are a spring-loaded apparatus that deploys teeth into wooden guides to make sure a conveyance will come to a safe stop if the hoist loses control or there is a broken or detached rope.” The problem though is that the select grade Douglas Fir that’s required for the wooden guides is becoming increasingly hard to source and very expensive. “It also wears out and has to be continually replaced and maintained, so it’s a huge maintenance issue,” said Brownlee. Galvanized steel guides are an option, but only if there’s a redundant rope. “For that reason, there’s a lot of interest in BMR hoists.” Constant power Because of the relatively short depth that the cages travel, they’re designed with a trailing cable for constant power. “Usually, when you go in a cage, everybody is standing around with their cap lights on and that’s the only light,” The cages are equipped with continuous load monitoring, LED lighting, a communication system, sensors for door position, a chairing solution and remotely operated wheel chocks to secure rail cars carrying supplies and equipment. said Brownlee. “This conveyance has LED lighting and a full communication system.” The cage operator can talk with the control room instead of ringing bells, although the bells will still be there for backup in the event of a power disruption. Other features of the cage include door sensors that prevent the cage from moving if a door is left open and a chairing mechanism that secures the cage at a level when heavy loads are moved in or out. The operator pulls a handle and four feet shoot out to park the cage. Spare cage An identical spare cage was required because of the mine’s location and the amount of time it would take to replace and install it. The cages break down into 28 sections for transport to the mine site and down to the sub-vertical shaft for reassembly. A cavern was excavated to store the spare cage and FLSmidth supplied storage and transfer equipment to move it into position in the shaft. “If the cage were damaged and they had to order another one, they’d have to shut down the mine for months,” said Brownlee. “They couldn’t take that risk. There are so many men who work down there and if they had to use a ramp, it would take half their shift to get there. By bringing them down in a cage, they can get to work right away.” FLSmidth, formerly GLV Dorr-Oliver, closed its Orillia manufacturing facility in 1998, electing instead to outsource manufacturing and focus on engineering and sales. “The purpose of outsourcing was to have multiple shops to work with, which would give us a pricing and delivery benefit,” said Brownlee. “We have worked with a number of suppliers over the years, but Stainless Steel Technology has emerged as a superior partner for us in every way.” Stainless Steel Technology has other customers but manufactures skips and cages exclusively for FLSmidth. The company operates out of a state-of-the-art, 55,000-square foot facility in Sudbury’s Lively Industrial Park and boasts a 6 x12-foot laser cutter, a computer-controlled 10 x 24-foot water jet cutter and a robotic welder. The Sudbury fabricator also has a drop test tower, which eliminates the need for expensive and potentially hazardous drop tests at the minesite. www.flsmidth.com www.stainlesssteeltech.com CONTENTS 7 Technology Hoverbarge proposed for access to Ring of Fire Year-round overland access beats six-week ice road season/7 12 News KGHM begins site preparation for Victoria Project Sinking of 1,892-metre exploration shaft planned for 2014/15 News Technology Exploration Energy ‘Build it and they will come’ strategy pays off North Bay’s new airport industrial park a hit with suppliers/12 Evening out with mining luminary Robert Friedland Flat is good, the Congo is a bit like Prince Edward Island/18 Proximity detection system keeps miners safe When a zone is breached, system issues audible alarm/17 First comes love, then comes marriage Miners, renewable energy developers check each other out/36 17 18 Also in this issue Symboticware wireless system speeds subsidence monitoring ........5 Mining companies get behind Scrap Cancer campaign ........................6 Vale, Glencore said to be considering Sudbury combination..............13 Redpath Group wins mine development contract in Zambia ..............13 NORCAT space mining group goes its own way .......................................16 Atlas Copco wins design award for rig control system .........................48 There’s more to Nevada than guys in Elvis suits ....................................49 Calendar of coming events, trade shows, short courses......................50 3
  3. 3. 4 NEWS December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal HERE’S WHY ONTARIO, CANADA IS YOUR NEXT BIG IDEA Opportunities for mineral exploration in Ontario abound. Powered by global leaders in innovation and safety standards, our mining practices are among the safest and most sustainable in the world. With business costs lower here than in most G7 countries, Ontario suppliers are more competitive – so you can depend on quality goods and services, delivered on time, on spec and on budget. Innovation is at our core. Make Ontario your next big idea. YourNextBigIdea.ca/Mining $2.9B in non-metallic minerals, including diamonds, was produced in Ontario in 2012 $2.6B in gold $1.5B in copper $1.4B in nickel $787M in other metals such as platinum and silver Paid for by the Government of Ontario. www.sudburyminingsolutions.com
  4. 4. SMSJ_Sept 2012_Pro_TH_PC Mobile Equipment for Safety and Productivity www.sudburyminingsolutions.com NEWS Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013 Wirelesstosolutionftspeeds subsidence monitoring Re-Located a 50,000 sq. . PLant! n Symboticware mesh network alerts miner to ground movement BY NORM TOLLINSKY A Northern Ontario gold miner is acquiring a wireless data solution from Sudbury-based Symboticware to quickly and efficiently monitor subsidence events linked to historical mining. The miner currently collects data manually from 47 wells equipped with multi-point borehole extensometers to monitor ground movement. The wells are located throughout the heart of the city’s core in parking lots, golf courses, next to fast food restaurants and other built-up areas. The wells are 18 to 16-inches in diameter, vary in depth from 10 to 60 feet and are covered by steel plates. Extensometers The multi-point borehole extensometers are long cables that stretch and contract in response to ground movement. If subsidence is detected, the mining company sends out a crew to dump sand into the well. The company used to send out crews every six months to take manual readings from the instrumentation. “They’d have to send out two or three guys because they had to lift a manhole cover to get a reading,” said Symboticware president Kirk Petroski. Snow cover in winter was a problem, and sometimes they’d have to stop traffic. With the company poised to proceed with the development of a nearby open pit, there’s a concern that the dewatering and blasting will trigger ground movement and subsidence, so a decision was made to go with an automated data collection system to streamline monitoring, said Petroksi. The pit will reclaim land containing mine hazards and unstable underground workings from historical mining operations, creating a lake and parkland accessible to the public. “What we’re doing is connecting a wireless device to the head of the sensor underneath the manhole cover,” explained Petroski. “The wireless device transmits the readings through a mesh network to a main controller at the minesite.” “The furthest monitoring point is four kilometres away, but they’re all located within 200 to 300 feet of each other. All these systems wake up and use each other to send the data Authorized to the main controller.” Four wells were equipped with wireless devices in November. The remaining 43 wells will be converted for wireless data collection between January and May. Solar collectors or lithium-ion batteries will supply power, depending on the location of the wells. Symboticare has been contracted to supply and maintain the system for a 10-year period. Geospatial interface A Google Earth-type geographic information system is being used to geospatially represent the data from the 47 wells, with colour-coded markers alerting mining company staff to ground movement and pop-up displays revealing extensometer readings. TECTERRA, an Alberta-based organization, provided a one-year loan as part of its mandate to support the development and commercialization of geomatics technology. Symboticware specializes in wireless data solutions for a variety of applications and is best known for its Symbot, a device designed to collect and wirelessly transmit real-time equipment performance data in underground mines. MobileLandcruiser Toyota Equipment for Safety and Productivity Dealer Authorized Toyota Landcruiser Dealer symboticware.com www.tecterra.com Haileybury Symboticware systems engineer Jon Petrenas demonstrates the wireless data collection and transmission solution that relays readings from multi-point borehole extensometers for monitoring of ground movement in the city’s subsidenceprone downtown core. Sudbury Timmins Val d’Or We supply mine-grade products, manufacture quality products, offer design, fabrication and custom machining, as well as sourcing. We are your one-stop shop for industrial needs. We are leaders in on-site VMI (Vendor Managed Inventory). Ask us about our customized VMI service programs. Call us at 1-800-669-3542 or email us at info@timeltd.ca Sales Rental Service Phone: (705) 476-4500 Email: mtsales@millertechnology.com Website: www.millertechnology.com timeltd.ca since 1971 5
  5. 5. 6 December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal NEWS www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Mining companies get behind Scrap Cancer campaign n Turning scrap into cold, hard cash BY HEATHER CAMPBELL Asking for money is standard practice in fundraising, but the Northern Cancer Foundation will also take scrap metal. Toasters, lawnmowers, boilers, cars, whatever. BM Metal Services, a division of Milman Industries, and other Sudbury area companies are turning scrap into cold, hard cash. When BM Metal Services called Northern Cancer Foundation executive director Tannys Laughren with the idea, she didn’t think they would make very much money but was willing to try. That first year, they made $21,000 - far more than she expected. BM Metal Services, a waste management and metal recycling company, partnered with the Northern Cancer Foundation to help collect and process the scrap. The company manages the entire process, including collection, preparation and selling of the metal. “This campaign is a fairly simple marriage for us,” said Shayne Smith, general manager of BM Metal Services. “We were looking for an opportunity to make a meaningful contribution to the community. My parents are cancer survivors Left to right are Dan Poirier of Vale; Tannys Laughren, executive director, Northern Cancer Foundation; Dave Duncan, mine manager, Copper Cliff Mine, Vale; Christine Harvey, marketing coordinator, BM Metal Services; and Roger Hines, Copper Cliff Mine, Vale, in front of a bin for collecting scrap metal. and many of our employees have been or are touched by cancer. It is a noble cause to get behind.” Donations are welcome at their yard, or can be dropped off in bins located at a number of locations around Sudbury. The Scrap Metal campaign runs every October. The money raised for the Northern Cancer Foundation remains in the community and supports research, patient care and the acquisition of new equipment. Vale and a few other mining and supply companies came on board in the second year of the program, almost doubling revenue to $35,000. “Health Sciences North joined in as well, donating an old boiler that brought in $12,000,” said Laughren. And one anonymous donor left a large ice machine by the bin recently. Dave Duncan, mine manager at Vale’s Copper Cliff Mine, is hoping for still more community involvement. “Anything from around the home can be donated,” said Duncan. “Steel tables, chairs, lawnmowers. It is a great way to give to a good cause while recycling material that might otherwise end up in the garbage.” Copper Cliff Mine won the Scrap Cancer Cup for 2011 and 2012, donating the most scrap metal. Carriere Industrial won in 2010. To build on the success of the campaign, more bin locations are being added and more businesses are being recruited to help out. BM Metal Services will drop off a bin at any business interested in participating. Long-term plans include starting more scrap metal campaigns in other northeastern Ontario cities. Last year, the campaign brought in $65,000, prompting participating companies to raise the bar even higher in future years www.milman.ca/_bmmetals www.ncrfsudbury.com Breathe easier one duct at a time ISO 9001 North Bay | Ontario | Canada T: (705) 472-2851 | F: (705) 472-4127 www.schauenburg.ca A company of the SCHAUENBURG International Group
  6. 6. www.sudburyminingsolutions.com NEWS Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal I December 1, 2013 Hoverbarge with 50-tonne payload capacity travels on a cushion of air over ice, snow or swampy terrain. Unit shown was built by ST Marine of Singapore. Hoverbarge proposed for year-round access to Ring of Fire I CEMI proposes novel means of transportation for construction material and equipment BY NORM TOLLINSKY While the battle over the mode and route of a fixed transportation link to Northern Ontario’s mineral-rich Ring of Fire drags on, a novel means of transporting construction material and equipment into the remote, waterlogged James Bay Lowlands is being proposed by the Sudbury-based Centre for Excellence in Mining Innovation (CEMI). Hoverbarges, which travel on a cushion of air, can carry hundreds of tonnes of material year-round unlike ice roads, which can only be used seasonally, according to CEMI president Doug Morrison. It will take years to build a road or railway to Cliffs Natural Resources’ massive chromite discovery and Noront Resources’ proposed nickel and PGM project 330 kilometres north of Ontario’s existing transportation infrastructure. Construction material Using hoverbarges to transport the vast quantity of construction material and equipment needed for the development of the mines “is a means of making sure the project will move forward before the fixed link is constructed,” said Morrison. Hoverbarges, he added, can also be used to transport material and equipment for the construction of the 30 or more bridges that would be required for a fixed transportation corridor. Ice roads, he said, won’t suffice for the tonnages required and are increasingly risky due to shortened seasons caused by global warming. Hoverbarges, manufactured by Singapore-based Hovertrans Solutions, can carry payloads of 50 to 2,500 tonnes. Self-propelled, diesel-powered versions can carry up to 200 tonnes and travel at a speed of 10 kilometres an hour over muskeg, water and ice. Larger units would be towed by a tractor with oversized balloon tires. Morrison has met with Cliffs, Noront and De Beers, and is exploring the possibility of tapping into Ontario’s Innovation Demonstration Fund, the federal government’s Sustainable Development Technology Fund and Fednor to fund a demonstration project using a 60-tonne hoverbarge that is “readily available.” Leasing and operating a hoverbarge for a two-year trial would cost $20 million, said Morrison, while a one-year trial would cost $12 million. Hoverbarges have primarily been used in wetland areas of the tropics by the oil and gas industry, hence the need to demonstrate their effectiveness in the terrain and climatic conditions of the James Bay Lowlands. The proposed trial would be used to determine the ideal size and figuration of the unit, and resolve any issues relating to noise and refueling. According to Morrison, the hoverbarges would travel year-round along cleared ice road routes, which would have to be extended to the proposed mine sites from their current points of termination. Impact on the land is a mere one to two pounds per square inch for a self-propelled hoverbarge and four to five pounds per square inch for a tractor with oversized balloon tires, he noted. In both cases, the impact is less than the seven to eight pounds per square inch attributable to a human being. Fleet Morrison envisions a fleet of differentsized hoverbarges, or hovercraft, to meet different needs. Larger units would be used to transport freight, while smaller and faster bus-sized units could be used as an alternative to much more expensive roads to transport people and supplies year-round to remote First Nation communities. Cliffs’ decision in June to suspend work on the environmental assess- ment for its Black Thor chromite project and the Ontario Mining and Lands Commissioner ruling in September denying Cliffs’ application for a road easement across mining claims staked by KWG Resources may delay the development of the Ring of Fire, but won’t put a halt to it, said Morrison. “This is a very major deposit and it will absolutely be mined. The major source of chromite at the present time is South Africa and South Africa has some challenges relating to power and labour unrest. (The chromite in the Ring of Fire) has a whole set of other challenges relating to access, weather, etc., but it’s a very major deposit that will go ahead. It’s just a question of when.” www.miningexcellence.ca www.hovertranssolutions.com BRIEFS New Gold completes acquisition of Rainy River New Gold Inc. has successfully completed its acquisition of Rainy River Resources Ltd. “We are pleased to have completed the acquisition of Rainy River and look forward to advancing it through the various stages of development,” said Randall Oliphant, executive chairman. The company is in the process of completing its detailed review and update of the Rainy River feasibility study as well as advancing the permitting efforts for the project. New Gold is an intermediate gold mining company with a portfolio of four producing assets and three development projects. The New Afton Mine in Canada, the Cerro San Pedro Mine in Mexico, the Mesquite Mine in the United States and the Peak Mines in Australia provide the company with its current production base. In addition to the Rainy River project, New Gold owns 100 per cent of the Blackwater project in British Columbia, as well as 30 per cent of the El Morro project in Chile. 7
  7. 7. 8 December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Opinion No endeavour for the faint of heart By Norm Tollinsky EDITOR Sudbury Mining Solution Journal This month marks the handover to operations at Vale’s state-of-the-art Totten Mine, the first new mine in the Sudbury Basin for Vale (and the former Inco) in 40 years. In this issue of Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal, you can read about the cutting-edge technology at Totten and some of the engineering challenges encountered during the mine’s construction, but the development of any new mine is primarily a human triumph made possible by hundreds of talented people working together as a team. Foremost among them in the case of Totten are the members of the in-house project management team – people like project manager Bill Booth, execution manager Gary Annett, automation and production lead Jack McIssac, operational readiness lead Bernie Parisé, senior environmental specialist Allison Merla, chief mine geologist Lance Howland, chief mine engineer Erick Jarvi and maintenance superintendent Jason MacKinnon. Building a new mine is no endeavour for the faint of heart. In the case of Totten, the project team oversaw the rehabilitation of a 4,130-foot timbered shaft built in1966, the excavation of 43,200 feet of lateral development plus thousands of feet of ventilation raises and boreholes, and the installation of the infrastructure and minewide communication system. They overcame ground control and water ingress challenges. They weathered a wild rollercoaster ride that saw nickel prices climb from $9 a pound in 2006 to $24 in 2007 and back down to $4 in 2008. And they directed the traffic of 500 or more workers from dozens of companies while chalking up an industry-leading safety record. Totten Mine is a testament to the incredible mining talent we have in Sudbury and Northern Ontario, but it is also indicative of the seemingly inexhaustible mineral wealth of the Sudbury Basin. Ore was discovered on the site of Totten Mine in 1884 and mined from 1890 to 1927, when there was a cave-in caused by a crown pillar failure. Inco bought the property in 1935 from the Mond Nickel Company, sunk the Number One shaft to the 820-foot level and mined approximately one million tonnes. The Number Two shaft –Totten’s current shaft – was sunk from 1966 to 1972, but placed on care and maintenance and allowed to flood in 1976 when nickel prices tanked. It was drilling in the 1990s that defined the deposit as it’s known today. Now, a mere seven kilometres east of Totten Mine, a similar story is playing out as KGHM International begins site preparation at its Victoria Project, where a new ore zone was recently discovered on the site of another historic mine. Clearly, after more than a century of mining, the mineral wealth of the Sudbury Basin is nowhere near exhaustion - great news for the talented people in the region’s mining community who thrive on challenges. See Pages 19 to 30 for a full report on Totten Mine and Page 15 for more on KGHM’s Victoria Project. Supply and service sector headed for good times By David Robinson ECONOMIST Laurentian University drobinson@laurentian.ca The mining supply and service sector will do much better than the rest of the economy over the next 50 years. Here’s why. And here is what we ought to do. There are three stylized facts that matter. For economists “stylized facts” capture the most important features of a situation. For the mining supply and service sector, the stylized facts are “Harold Hotelling,” “China,” and “technology.” “Technology” obviously stands for the fact that in mining, as in other fields, labour is being replaced by capital and services. That means the mining supply and service sector will be getting a bigger and bigger share of the value-added of the mining sector. “China” stands for the huge growth in demand for minerals that we know is coming. No one really doubts that we will need to produce as much copper over the next 30 or 50 years as has been produced in the whole history of mining. You might quibble about whether the right time frame is 25 or 55 years, but this stylized fact tells us that the pie will get a lot bigger. This means the supply sector will be getting bigger share of a bigger pie. The third stylized fact comes from and old piece of economic theory. In 1931, Harold Hotelling published a paper that showed resource prices should rise exponentially. It was a brilliant bit of analysis, and it became a foundation stone in the field of Resource Economics. It also became the biggest embarrassment faced by theorists in the field because resource prices actually fell throughout most of the 20th Century. Even by the 1990s, researchers didn’t have statistical evidence that resource prices were starting to trend upward. The sharp spikes that they were seeing could have been accidents. Now, we are almost certain that we are into a long period of rising prices. This rise may be the result of a “Super Cycle” in the world economy. If that is true, then we may only have 30 years of relatively high prices. If the Hotelling Effect kicks in, we can expect to see a permanent change in the relative price of what the mining sector produces. In any case, we have positive fact number three: rising prices for metals will mean more lavish spending on equipment and services. If the share of mining value-added increases by 50 per cent and total output increases by a factor of five, the supply sector will have to grow by a factor of 7.5. Add in rising prices and the sector’s revenues will increase by at least 10 times. Supplying the mining sector will be a very good business to be in. For supply firms, the question is how to position themselves for this bonanza. The answers are fairly obvious. Invest heavily and soon. Buy competitors. Do a lot of research. And play politics in a strategic way: support industry organizations like SAMSSA and encourage governments to spend more on research related to mining and much more on research for the supply sector. For industry organizations like SAMSSA, the first job is to make Canadian governments understand that we have an historic opportunity to expand Canadian trade. The supply sector is still languishing in the government’s blind spot. It is overshadowed by the drama of high-stakes gambles in the mining industry, outshone by the financial sector and outshouted by the major mining players. It is hard for policy makers to see that there could easily be more revenue for government from growing the supply sector than from growing the mining industry itself. For Canada, the big question is what the country can do to make sure Canadian firms grab a much bigger share of the much bigger pie. The country needs a national strategy to supply mining companies around the world with Canadian equipment, consumables and services. A good start would be a road-mapping process for the mining supply industry. The U.S. did it 15 years ago for its own mining industry. Our mining companies would be happy to help guide supplier research and innovation. A great role for government would be to bring together a very diverse and scattered sector to plan for a very exciting future. December 1, 2013, Vol. 10, No. 4 Editor Norm Tollinsky ntollinsky@sudburyminingsolutions.com Editorial Advisory Board David Robinson, Chair Associate Professor, Economics Laurentian University Greg Baiden Canadian Chair, Robotics and Mine Automation Dick DeStefano Executive Director, Sudbury Area Mining Supply and Service Association Erin Richmond Manager, Economic Development City of North Bay Dennis Shannon President, National Mine Safety Training Centre Daniel Giroux Vice President, Collège Boréal Graphic Designer Mandy Kinnonen mkinnonen@nob.on.ca Creative Resources Matina Castonguay Barb Smith Allan McMullan Tom Colton Circulation Giselle Perrin giselep@nob.on.ca President Michael R. Atkins matkins@laurentianmedia.com Publisher Patricia Mills pmills@nob.on.ca Marketing Director Brandi Braithwaite 705-673-5705 ext. 381 brandi@nob.on.ca Contact Information Telephone: 705-673-5705 Fax: 705-673-9542 Mail: Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal 158 Elgin St. S Sudbury, Ontario, Canada P3E 3N5 Online: www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Subscription Inquiries: 705-673-5705 Advertising Inquiries: Patricia Mills 705-673-5705 pmills@nob.on.ca Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal is published quarterly, in March, June, September and December, by Northern Ontario Business Limited Publications Mail Agreement No. 40065411. Return undeliverable addresses to Circulation Dept. 158 Elgin St. S Sudbury, ON P3E 3N5 ISSN 1710-7903
  8. 8. www.sudburyminingsolutions.com opinion Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013 Women. What would we do without them? By Dick DeStefano EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR SAMSSA destefan@isys.ca Modern Mining Technology Sudbury (MMTS) is one of the best organizations in Canada for promoting and creating awareness of mining and the technology advances in the industry. The organization is responsible for number of mining games and activities geared to elementary and high school students and teachers during April and May each year, events that attract thousands of students from the Sudbury district to Dynamic Earth, the city’s geoscience centre. These innovative and interactive opportunities expose students to the importance of new technologies required for the future of mining. MMTS 2013 week-long events attracted over 1,000 attendees. MMTS 2014 will be special because the organization has commitments from a number of professional women with mining industry experience. The profiles of women in mining in this edition of Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal reflect the important role women are playing in the industry. However, in addition to playing a role in industry, women are taking a lead in promoting mining as a great career choice. Much credit must go to Nicole Tardif, former chair of MMTS. Program coordinator at Laurentian Unversity’s Goodman School of Mines, Nicole led a group of volunteers to rebrand and restructure the Sudbury Mining Week organization to move into the 21st Century. Her perseverance during the past two years led to the creation of a nonprofit organization with a full governance structure and multiple committees. She will continue to work with the MMTS executive as secretary and will be an active member in the years to come. Lori Martin, geology lead at Glencore Xstrata’s Fraser Morgan Project in Sudbury, has agreed to serve as chair for the next two years. Lori has a significant background in mining exploration and analysis and, last year, was responsible for sponsorship support for MMTS. Lori is very thorough and committed to the industry, and we look forward to her leadership and ideas during the next two years. Claudine Beausoleil of the Bharti “Women are taking a lead in promoting mining as a great career choice.” – Dick DeStefano Executive Director, SAMSSA School of Engineering at Laurentian University is vice-chair for the forthcoming year and has been an active supporter of MMTS. She is well known in mining circles as she is responsible for finding co-op placements for students. Claudine brings a high level of energy and professionalism to the MMTS committee. Samantha Epsley, Vale’s general manager of mines mill technical services for Ontario Operations, has agreed to serve as honourary chair for the forthcoming year. Samantha has a wealth of operational experience and recently received the prestigious Women in Mining Canada National Trailblazer Award. She is a past-president and a founding director of WISE Sudbury (Women in Science Engineering), a past member of the board of trustees for Science North, a long-standing member of CIM and has been an executive member of the CIM Sudbury Branch. She is also a newly appointed board member for the Bharti School of Engineering at Laurentian University. Alana Arcand, Canadian mining coordinator at Golder Associates in Sudbury, is responsible for the annual MMTS career showcase, as well as the advertising campaign for the week-long MMTS. Alana has proven to be a capable and excellent organizer. Other members of the executive are the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines’ Sean MacLean, who will oversee sponsorship, and Ed Debicki who serves as MMTS treasurer. Ed is the senior manager of the Ontario Geological Survey’s Geoscience Laboratories. Yours truly, past honorary chair, will continue to work on the MMTS executive committee as a director emeritus, a newly created position. A significant number of MMTS committees are led by women. Shannon Katary of CEMI, Danica Pagnutti of Vale, Diana Holloway of Northern Life newspaper, Jennifer Beaudry of Dynamic Earth (Science North) and Sherrie Burrell, executive assistant, Stantec, are also contributing to the success of MMTS. For full details on committee members and the proposed events for 2014, visit http://www.modernmining.ca/author/ mmts. Charters Cargo Flights Serving Timmins, Ontario Exploration Geoscience Symposium Thunder Bay, and  November 5 w 6, 2013, United Steelworkers No Northern Ontario. Local 6500 rving Sudbury, Ontario e Hall, S k! anuc Peaw Booth Poster Space Available Daily Scheduled Flights Northwestern Ontario Mines Minerals Symposium ✓ April 8 9, 2014 Departing Timmins Free Admission to Exhibits on Tuesday, Ontario xp Vahalla Inn, ThunderEBayration G lo th eoscience S November 5 after 3 p.m. every single day. Novembe 5 Northeastern Ontario Mines Minerals rSymposium ymposium 6, 2013, U nited Steelw Local 6500 H orkers all, Sudbury ✓ April 15 16, 2014 , Ontario Ontario Prospectors Association – Awards Dinner McIntyre Arena, Timmins Booth Pos 6 p.m. Tuesday, November 5th ter Space A vailable Ticketed Event Fr ee Admission to Exh November 5 th ibits on Tuesday, after 3 p.m. participate contact Susan or Garry at To Ontario Prosp ectors Assoc iation – Awar 866.259.3727 (807.622.3284) or 6 p.m. Tues ds D oegs@ontarioprospectors.com day, Novem Email inner th Ticketed Eve ber 5 nt To participa For additional details on For additional details on prospecting funding te contact S usan or Gar 866.259.37 ry at prospecting funding27 (807.622.3 Email oegs@ or Symposia, 4)Symposia, please visit our website at 28 or ontarioprospe www.ontarioprospectors.com please visit our website at ctors.com For additiona www.ontarioprospectors.com l details on pr ospecting fu Symposia, pl nding or ease Email www.ontario visit our website at prospectors. oegs@ontarioprospectors.com com thunderair.com 1 800 803 9943 or 9
  9. 9. 10 December 1, 2013 I Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal RESEARCH www.sudburyminingsolutions.com College invites manufacturers to innovation sandbox Industrial-sized robot mounted on a track at ICAMP’s Canadore College trades campus can tool CNC machine in two hours, versus the six hours it takes for a machinist. I ICAMP opens doors BY NORM TOLLINSKY Manufacturers and entrepreneurs from North Bay and the rest of Northern Ontario have a standing invitation to come and “play” in a sandbox with the latest in 3D laser scanning, polymer printing and robotic technology. ICAMP, the Innovation Centre for Advanced Manufacturing and Production, celebrated its official opening in September. The 8,500-square foot innovation centre, located at Canadore College’s trade campus in North Bay, is equipped for reverse engineering, product design and rapid prototyping. Cutting-edge “toys” include a hand-held Metra Scan 3D optical scanning system, Solid Works virtual reality simulation software, a 3D theatre, a Connex 500 3D polymer printer and a robot with a 9 axis CNC milling machine. Still to come are a scanning electron microscope and a water jet cutter. 1 1/17/2013 12:02:34 PM Penguin_ASI_Advertising_2013.pdf “If I’m a manufacturer of mining equipment, I can send my employees to ICAMP to learn how to program a robot to tool a machine, so I don’t have to buy it and have it sit on my floor for eight months while I’m getting up to speed.” – Charles Gagnon, Manager, Corporate Relations, Canadore College ICAMP “is an incubator, a sandbox, where companies can come and have access to this equipment,” said Charles Gagnon, the college’s manager of corporate relations. “If I’m a manufacturer of mining equipment, I can send my employees to ICAMP to learn how to program a robot to tool a machine, so I don’t have to buy it and have it sit on my floor for eight months while I’m getting up to speed. I can use it at ICAMP and practise on it until I’m comfortable.” In addition to offering companies expertise and technology, ICAMP will connect clients with funding agencies to support their research, product development and process improvement. For example, a manufacturer or entrepreneur with an idea for a new wrench can scan an existing one, import it into Solid Works software, adapt it, view it in a 3D theatre and then produce a replica of it using the polymer printer. An industrial-sized robot mounted on a track to the nine-axis CNC machine and a miniature, six axis training robot offer manufacturers an opportunity to test drive 21st century manufacturing technology. “Mining supply companies have been very slow in adopting robotic technology,” said Gagnon. “We know there’s going to be a tremendous skill shortage in the coming years. Robotics can help address it. We also face offshore competition. Using a robot, you can tool a machine in two hours, versus the six hours it takes for a machinist.” Safely creating Independence with teleautonomy. C M Y CM MY CY CMY K Penguin Automated Systems Inc. 1755 Regional Road 55 Naughton, Ontario, Canada P0M 2M0 penguinasi.com
  10. 10. RESEARCH www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Charles Gagnon, corporate relations manager for Canadore College, demonstrates hand-held 3D optical scanner. Gagnon and Canadore president George Burton consulted widely with North Bay manufacturers to conceptualize ICAMP and its toolkit of prototyping and manufacturing technology. “We pounded the cement for a year and a half visiting companies, talking to owners and asking them what kind of equipment we should buy,” said Gagnon. “We had a tremendous amount of input and we were very fortunate to have strong participation from local businesses.” The federal and provincial governments each contributed $1 million. Another $800,000 came from the college and local businesses, including Rotacan, a manufacturer of rotary blasthole bits, Wipware, a manufacturer of photoanalysis and fragmentation analysis systems, Pilot Diamond Tools, Premium Mining, 3H Manufacturing and GinCor Industries. Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013 Visitors at ICAMP’s official opening learn about miniature, six axis training robot. There are plans to hire a metals and materials expert to assist clients and equipment suppliers themselves will demonstrate their technology through workshops and presentations. A working relationship with other innovation centres across Northern Ontario is in the formative stages. ICAMP has signed a memorandum of understanding with MAJIC, the Materials Joining Innovation Centre in Kirkland Lake, and hopes to establish a similar relationship with the Sault Ste. Marie Innovation Centre and the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology in Sudbury. “It’s a natural down the road because we need to work together,” said Gagnon. www.canadorecollege.ca/ICAMP Control panel on Doosan CNC machine. Komatsu equipment is built to work in rugged environments and harsh applications, yet it is engineered to perform with top precision in sensitive sites. To meet the diversified requirements of the construction and mining industries, your organization needs quality equipment and a premier dealer to deliver reliable support time after time. By combining Komatsu’s innovative te chnolo g y w ith S M S E q ui p m e nt supp or t organization, you can count on moving more material while reducing your production cost and increasing your profit. Eastern Region: 1 800 881-9828 Western Region: 1 866 458-0101 Timmins: 705 264-4300 www.smsequip.com 11
  11. 11. 12 December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal NEWS www.sudburyminingsolutions.com New industrial park home to three mining suppliers n orth Bay airport park N ends shortage of fully serviced land BY NORM TOLLINSKY The new 600-acre Airport Industrial Park in North Bay has put an end to the chronic shortage of fully-serviced industrial land in the city and attracted three mining suppliers in search of new and larger premises: Mine Hoists International, Barrie Hard Chrome Plating and Drillers Edge. “North Bay is the only city in Canada that will sell airside land on or beside an airport,” said mayor Al McDonald. It’s also one of only four airports in Ontario that boasts a 10,000-foot runway capable of accommodating the largest aircraft in the world, the Antonov 225, which has carried payloads of up to 189 tonnes and made several stops in North Bay over the years. “It’s very difficult finding industrial land beside an airport, said McDonald. “Mining supply firms need access worldwide, so it makes sense that there’s a lot of interest in the park.” Mine Hoists International, a wholly owned subsidiary of Mining Equipment Ltd. of Colorado, refurbishes, rents and sells mine hoists and shaft sinking winches from its new 14,000-square foot building in the park. “We buy used hoists when they become available, we store them in our yard, and when they find a new home, we refurbish and upgrade them with new electrical controls, PLC controls and brake controls to meet modern standards,” said Dan Howe, president. Prior to moving into the park, the company subcontracted work to other shops in the city. Bringing the work in-house, he said, “helps us with scheduling and gives us more capacity.” The building is equipped with 80-tonne and 12.5-tonne cranes for lifting hoists and winches off a trailer and moving them into work areas. Customers include mine contractors Dumas, Cementation and former co-owner J.S. Redpath. “We’ve also sold equipment into Tanzania, Mexico, Chile and Peru,” said Howe. Barrie Hard Chrome Plating chromes inner tubes and outer tubes for diamond drilling from a state-of-the-art 12,000-square foot building in the park. In business in North Bay since 1965, the company has twice as much space as it had in its former location and has invested in new chrome plating tanks, hoists and scrubber systems to meet strict environmental standards. Chrome applications of between two and four one thousandths of an inch resist wear and corrosion, prolonging the life of SMSJ_December_2013_Pro_JG_am Dan Howe, president of Mine Hoists International, in the company’s new 14,000-square foot building in North Bay’s Airport Industrial Park. the tubes. “It doesn’t sound like a lot, but the chrome is so hard, it makes everything last longer,” said owner Jamie Corbeil. Barrie Hard Chrome customers include Boart Longyear, Atlas Copco and Drillers Edge, an immediate neighbour at both its former and current locations. Founded in 2010 by a trio of former Boart Longyear employees, Drillers Edge moved into its new, 28,000-square foot Rock Solid Solutions building in November. Starting off as a manufacturer of drill bits and core retrieval tools, the company recently broadened its product line to include rods and casings. In September, it completed a strategic merger with Edmonton-based Di-Corp, which has focused until recently on supplying drilling fluids to the oil patch in Western Canada and is now aggressively diversifying into mining exploration.
  12. 12. NEWS www.sudburyminingsolutions.com “Despite the slowdown in the exploration industry, we’ve seen growth every year – even this year with the addition of rods and casings to our product line,” said operations manager Lori Leblond. Drillers Edge has focused more on export markets such as South America, Turkey and Russia. Now, as a subsidiary of Di-Corp, which has also acquired Drilling Depot and West Coast Drilling Supplies, Driller Edge will also have a stronger presence in the Canadian market, said Leblond. The idea of building an airport industrial park dates back to 1988, but it took until 2010 for the three levels of governments to fund it. “The province and the feds each contributed $2 million and we contributed $2 million,” said McDonald. “That was the final hurdle allowing us to go ahead.” The city will sell or lease land, and connect prospective tenants with local investors and developers who will build to suit. “The inventory of serviced industrial land in North Bay was very tight, if not non-existent before we opened this park,” said McDonald. “We’re finding that local companies that were hindered by not being able to expand on their footprint are looking to the airport park for expansion, and that’s opening up space for smaller companies and startups.” www.cityofnorthbay.ca www.drillersedge.com www.minehoist.com www.di-corp.com Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013 BRIEFS Vale, Glencore rumoured to be exploring Sudbury combination Media reports circulating since October have Glencore Xstrata and Vale in discussions about combining their nickel mining operations in the Sudbury Basin, although neither company has issued confirmation. The original Reuters news item quoted “sources familiar with the situation” saying “discussions are still at an early stage but have revived hopes of a long debated Sudbury tieup, with the companies considering a number of options for their mining and processing operations in the area.” When previous owners Inco and Falconbridge flirted with a merger in 2006, estimated savings of more than $500 million a year were expected from the resulting synergies. The Reuters report said “talks restarted after Glencore completed its acquisition of Xstrata earlier this year…against the backdrop of a nickel price that has fallen by around a fifth since January to around four-year lows, weighed down by over-supply.” Kidd operation wins safety award Top to bottom are the new homes of Drillers Edge Mine Hoists International and Barrie Hard Chrome Plating. Glencore Xstrata’s Kidd Operation in Timmins has won Workplace Safety North’s President’s Award for its contribution to building safe and healthy workplaces in Ontario.  “Everyone’s really proud of the win,” said Tom Semadeni, general manager of Kidd Operations. “It’s really icing on the cake because earlier this year we won the John T. Ryan national safety trophy for the best safety performance for a Canadian metal mine.  “I think it’s great to promote success in the area of safety. A lot of times, businesses have a tendency to notice and follow up on things that are going badly or wrong, but you need to recognize success, not only internally, but also publicly. “We’re the deepest base metal mine in the world and that creates its own set of challenges… with logistics, transportation and supervision of people over vast distances. “There are two aspects of benchmarking that are important,” noted Semadeni. “One is that you should be improving relative to yourself. Sometimes it is difficult to compare yourself to others because every operation is different. So I think the aspect of the award where you need to demonstrate year-on-year improvement is important because the most important thing is to be able to prove to yourself that you are improving your own operation. The rest of the world moves around and you can’t control that, but you can control your own destiny, your own operation. “Changing human behaviour and changing our habits are hard,” added Semadeni. “It takes a lot of hard work to improve safety, so I think a validation of that work is a great feeling.” Redpath Group wins contract in Zambia’s Copper Belt The Redpath Group has won a contract for the expansion of Mopani Copper Mines’ Mindola Mine in the Zambian Copper Belt. The North Bay, Ontario, mining contractor’s Johannesburg group is busy mobilizing for the project, which will include shaft sinking, raiseboring and lateral development. “The contract is of substantial importance to the international Redpath Group and will prove to be a major contributor towards our long-term growth in Africa,” said company president George Flummerfelt. Mopani Copper Mines is co-owned by Glencore International (73.1 per cent), First Quantum Minerals (16.9 per cent) and ZCCM Investment Holdings (10 per cent). The Mindola Mine is part of Mopani Copper’s Nkana complex, located in Kitwe, 388 kilometres north of Lusaka. Earlier this year, Redpath also completed a sand tunnel project at Gem Diamonds’ Ghaghoo diamond mine in Botswana. Redpath drove a concrete lined tunnel to 112 metres below surface at an incline of eight degrees using an open-faced tunnel shield. “It was a very challenging project,” said Flummerfelt. “It’s a big 50-tonne hydraulic shield with a safety canopy. The sand is dug out under the protection of the shield, which is advanced a half metre at a time. “A similar solution is used in horizontal applications for civil works, but we adapted it for this project.” In addition to its North American business unit and headquarters based in North Bay and its presence in Johannesburg, Redpath has offices in Australia, Chile and Germany. Concrete lined tunnel excavated by Redpath Group’s South Africa division for Gem Diamonds’ Ghaghoo diamond mine in Botswana. “In the last year, we worked in some 18 different countries,” said Flummerfelt. A wholly-owned subsidiary of Deilmann-Haniel International Mining and Tunneling of Dortmund, Germany, the Redpath Group employs approximately 6,200 people, including between 180 and 200 at its headquarters in North Bay. www.redpathmining.com 13
  13. 13. 14 December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal NEWS www.sudburyminingsolutions.com “An energy audit helped us identify opportunities to save money by reducing electricity use.” Mike Bannon, VP of Production, Tempo Plastics Saving energy makes sense – business sense. Energy efficiency incentives from your local electric utility are available for Get up to 70% off project costs, including: manufacturing operations like yours. Whether you’re in the plastics and • Engineering studies for up to 70% of your project costs, including engineering studies and process • On-site energy manager and systems upgrades to help lower operating costs. • Key system upgrades • Monitoring and targeting packaging, automotive or food and beverage industry, you may be covered Big or small, every Ontario business can benefit from energy efficiency. Contact your local electric utility or visit saveonenergy.ca/industrial Subject to additional terms and conditions found at saveonenergy.ca. Subject to change without notice. A mark of the Province of Ontario protected under Canadian trade-mark law. Used under licence. OM Official Marks of the Ontario Power Authority.
  14. 14. NEWS www.sudburyminingsolutions.com KGHM begins site preparation for Victoria Project n xcavation of E 1,892-metre exploration shaft to commence next year BY NORM TOLLINSKY KGHM International has commenced site construction work at its Victoria Project 30 kilometres west of Sudbury in preparation for the sinking of an exploration shaft next year. The 6.7-metre diameter shaft is scheduled to be completed by the end of 2016 and will extend to a depth of 1,892 metres. Lateral development will follow at the 1,400, 1,600 and 1,800-metre levels for underground definition drilling and the extraction of a bulk sample in 2018. Parent company KGHM Polska Miedz acquired the Victoria Project when it purchased Quadra FNX in December 2011 for $3.3 billion. Hailed by former Quadra FNX president Paul Blythe as “one of the most significant discoveries made in the Sudbury district in the past 40 years,” Victoria boasts an inferred resource of approximately 12 million tonnes grading 2.3% copper, 2.2% nickel and 8.5 g/t precious metals. “At this point in time, we’re looking at a single, exploration shaft scenario because it’s an inferred resources. We want to be able to go down to and determine its actual size.” – Adrian McFadden, Vice-President, Underground Operations, KGHM International The deposit starts at 1,000 metres from surface and remains open at 2,000 metres. At that depth, surface drilling would be “like pushing down on a piece of spaghetti,” hence the decision to proceed to an advanced exploration program, explained Adrian McFadden, vice-president of underground operations for KGHM International. KGHM has submitted a closure plan to the Ministry of Northern Development and Mines and has signed memoranda of understanding with the Sagamok and Atikameksheng First Nations. The company had a choice of sinking two shafts concurrently or in sequence. “At this point in time, we’re looking at a single exploration shaft scenario because it’s an inferred resources,” said McFadden. “We want to be able to go down and determine its actual size. The way it looks right now, we’d be able to convert it to a ventilation shaft, or use it as a production shaft if the orebody isn’t sustainable for a higher mining rate or there’s some surprise that we don’t anticipate.” A decision on the economic viability of the project would be made following the conclusion of definition drilling in 2018. Commencement of mining operations would depend on the results of advanced exploration, commodity prices and a decision on whether to sink a second shaft. Commercial production would likely begin at a rate of 1,200 to 1,500 tonnes per day in 2023 and increase to 3,500 tonnes per day over a mine life of 10 plus years, according to McFadden. Discovery Copper and nickel sulphide mineralization was first discovered on the Victoria property in 1886. The property was acquired by the Mond Nickel Company in 1889 and yielded 888,000 tonnes of ore grading 2.99% copper and 2.12% nickel between 1900 and 1923. Inco acquired the property following its merger with Mond Nickel in 1931 and brought it back into production in 1973, producing 649,000 tonnes of ore averaging 1.26% copper, .083% nickel and .067 oz/tonne of total precious metals. In 2001, Inco sold Victoria and four other “non-core” assets to FNX Mining. Following the discovery of a new ore zone south of the historic Victoria Mine in 2011, Quadra FNX announced plans to spend upwards of $750 million to sink two concurrent shafts in support of a 2,500 to 4,000 tonne per day mining operation. However, plans for Victoria were shelved when KGHM acquired Quadra FNX and entered into negotiations with Vale over processing terms and “back-in rights” to the project. The two-year hiatus concluded in August when the two companies came to an agreement that leaves KGHM as the sole owner of the project with Vale receiving a royalty and off-take on production from the mine. KGHM has a workforce of approximately 600 people in the Sudbury Basin and produces ore from the McCreedy West Mine and the Levack Mine’s Morrison deposit, which it accesses from Glencore’s adjacent Craig Mine. The Victoria Project is approximately seven kilometres east of Vale’s Totten Mine. www.quadrafnx.com www.kghm.pl Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013 15 SLURRY SLUDGE TAILINGS ...or just plain water WE ARE YOUR PUMPING SOLUTION! Aquatech stocks and delivers a complete line of portable pumping equipment. 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  15. 15. 16 December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal INVEST IN DRYDEN Northwestern Ontario’s Service Centre Emerging gold belt of NWO ... opportunity ahead • Centrally located on highway 17 • Access to 40+ First Nation markets • Low taxes and affordable land • No development charges • Knowledgable economic support • Diverse retail and service sector • Supportive business community www.dryden.ca 1-877-7-DRYDEN or edo@dryden.ca NEWS www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Deltion aims for the moon BY SCOTT HADDOW Deltion Innovations Ltd. CEO Dale Boucher wants people to pay close attention to the new company, as it is going places. Far away places. “If things go well, you will see our logo on the moon in 2018. Watch us,” Boucher said. Deltion is an independently owned business spun out of the Innovation and Prototype Department of the Northern Centre for Advanced Technology (NORCAT). The department has been hard at work on space mining technologies since 1995. When NORCAT decided to no longer continue the work last year, members of the department banded together to keep it alive. Deltion is a private corporation, but is leasing space from NORCAT. There are nine shareholders, all former employees of the NORCAT Innovation and Prototype Department. “We believe there is a great opportunity here,” Boucher said. “Our capabilities are rather unique in North America. We were encouraged by NASA and the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) to continue. We think we are on the threshold of something great. We think Canada and the Canadian mining sector in particular can play a significant role in the space mining industry. We think, Canada being a leader in mining technologies, should lead the way. We all think it is worthwhile to continue our work.” Drilling technology The Deltion team has been designing and fabricating drilling and excavation technology for more than a decade, specializing in transferring and adapting technologies developed in the space sector to the terrestrial market and viceversa. Technology includes drilling and excavation systems, processing, power systems, remote operations and subsurface exploration equipment. Launched officially in September, Deltion is already in full swing. The team is working with NASA and CSA on the development of drilling technology for the RESOLVE payload destined for the Lunar Resource Prospector Mission scheduled for 2018. Deltion recently finished the concept study for a drill they will build for the mission. It is a tight deadline - going to the moon in four years but one Boucher knows his team can meet. “We looked at a diamond drill that can operate in a liquid-nitrogen environment and operate with little power to drill one-metre into frozen rock, dirt and water,” Boucher said. “Our concept comes in at under 100 watts of power. Deltion Innovations CEO Dale Boucher. It is an interesting project. NASA is on a mission in 2018 to prospect for water and ice and they invited Canada to participate. We hope to be the provider for the drill. NASA Deltion is also in negotiations with NASA on a long-term contract and has done a concept study for the Centre for Excellence in Mining Innovation on space suit technology and how it can be adapted to improve the health of miners working at depth here on Earth. “There are a lot of areas in which we can be beneficial to both the space mining industry and the mining industry,” Boucher said. Deltion was formed with three main priorities. It wants to develop mining technologies and systems for space, robotic mining systems and technologies for Earth and adapt space-derived technologies for the mining industry. And they want to do it in Sudbury. There is no other place they would rather be except for the moon or an asteroid or far away planet. “We were keen to keep it in Sudbury,” Boucher said. “We had a lot of space agencies asking us why we’re not moving, but mining is in our blood in Sudbury. If the 2018 mission comes through, we will have to hire more staff quickly to meet the requirements.” Deltion also negotiated the rights to host the Planetary and Terrestrial Mining Sciences Symposium, an annual event held since 2004, as well as the joint PTMSS/Space Resources Roundtable, held since 2012. The PTMSS, scheduled to be held in Boulder, Colorado in 2014, addresses the parallels between Earth-based mining and space mining.
  16. 16. TECHNOLOGY www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013 Proximity detection system marketed by Hard-Line Solutions triggers an audible alarm when mine personnel get too close to underground equipment. System keeps miners out of harm’s way BY LINDSAY KELLY A new detection system developed by Hard-Line Solutions of Sudbury alerts workers when they get too close to a piece of heavy equipment while working underground. The new product will increase safety for workers with the aim of preventing injury or death on the job. “There have been incidents in the mining industry where these sorts of things happen because people become complacent with using a remote control,” said Max Gray of Hard-Line Solutions. “They get too close to it, they make an error, and all of a sudden it’s too late for them to react. This system will warn them so they can react.” Integrated into Hard-Line’s Muckmaster Radio Remote Control System, Prox detects when a remote operator enters a zone around the piece of machinery being operated. When a zone is breached, the system emits an audible and visual warning and can be programmed to slow or stop the machine automatically. Other proximity detection systems are on the market, but they operate as separate wireless systems, Gray said. Because both run on radio signals, there’s the potential for the two systems to interfere with each other, and both could fail. Because Prox is integrated into Hard-Line’s system, it eliminates the opportunity for interference. Vice-president Ryan Siggelkow said the company had been researching the idea for about four years. Predictability “We’ve seen many systems that are not predictable,” Siggelkow said. “They’ll (trigger an alert) within 30 feet one time and within 15 feet the next time, and that, to us, wasn’t good enough. We finally found one that actually was very predictable and repeatable.” The system Hard-Line eventually chose was originally developed by another company for use in coal mining, so it had to be adapted for a hard-rock environment. Radio signals react differently underground in a hard rock environment than they do surrounded by coal, a softer material. Testing When tested at the NORCAT test mine, “it performed perfectly,” Gray said. “We’ve projected that we can probably sell 50 to 100 systems in the first year of launching it and that’s probably a conservative estimate,” Gray said. “Right now, we’re going to be moving this in Ontario and Quebec … and we’re negotiating right now for our South American offices (Chile, Peru) and also for the Australian market.” Customer needs are also behind the development of a second safety system launched in the last few months. Developed at the request of Xstrata Nickel (now Glencore), Entry Alert is a warning system that notifies both remote operators and mine personnel when someone enters a stope. A light beam spans the stope entrance while a strobe light flashes to notify pedestrian and vehicle traffic that remote mucking is in progress. If the light beam is broken by entry into the area, the strobe at the operator station is immediately activated, notifying the operator. It’s a simple solution, but one Gray said can make a significant impact on underground safety. “One death is too many,” Gray said. “It’s dangerous down there, so the more a company can do to protect its workers, and the more the employees can do to protect themselves, the better it is for everybody.” Glencore was so satisfied with the result that it now plans to install it throughout the mine. Gray said other companies have expressed interest in it as well. “CUSTOMIZED SOLUTIONS BALANCING PERFECTION SPEED” T: 705.256.6221 F: 705.256.6503 MACHINING • CNC Turning and Milling Capabilities • Full Service Shop • Ability to turn 52” diameter and 22 ft in length ISO and CWB Certified 190 Sackville Road Sault Ste. Marie, ON Canada P6A 4T6 “Serving Canada for over 75 years” MILLWRIGHTING • Our Industrial Millwrights can remove, rebuild, reinstall commission all types of new and used industrial equipment. • We accommodate large projects provide mobile millwrighting DRIVELINE • Manufacture OEM quality driveshafts for automotive as well as industrial off road equipment, mills and factories • Largest Stocking Driveline component Distributor in Northern Ontario • RMW stocks major brands: Warn Winches, Muncie Hydraulic Products, Spicer, Arvin Meritor, GWB, Voith Neapco www.rectormachineworks.com WELDING FABRICATION • Light, Medium and Heavy Fabrication as well as Structural • Punching, Bending, Shearing and Rolling • Proven track record in the fabrication and installation of piping, complete conveyor systems and misc mining equipment. HYDRAULICS • Manufacture and rebuild Cylinders, Motors Pumps • We stock replacement parts and kits for all makes models. 2010 NOBA COMPANY OF THE YEAR 16-50 EMPLOYEES 17
  17. 17. 18 December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal EXPLORATION www.sudburyminingsolutions.com “Anyone who tells you that the supercycle is over is completely idiotic.” – Robert Friedland, executive chairman, Ivanhoe Mines Ltd. Billionaire mining financier and mine finder Robert Friedland kicked off a lecture series at Laurentian University’s Goodman School of Mines in October. Friedland: supercycle has legs n ining luminary M talks up copper, platinum and zinc BY NORM TOLLINSKY “The supercycle for metals is very much alive,” according to internationally renowned financier and mining luminary Robert Friedland. Kicking off a lecture series at Laurentian University’s Goodman School of Mines in Sudbury October 9th, the executive chairman of Ivanhoe Mines said, “Anyone who tells you that the supercycle is over is completely idiotic. “The fundamental, overwhelming, most important phenomenon of our age is urbanization,” he said. “In 1970, when I was 20 years old, 39 million people lived in magacities – that’s cities with a population of more than 10 million. There were only two of them – New York and Tokyo. By 2011, we had 359 million people in 23 megacities and, tomorrow morning in geological time, 2025, we’ll have 630 million people living in megacities.” From 1900 to the present, said Friedland, world consumption of copper totalled 585 million tonnes. With hydrogen fuel cell automobiles, high-speed trains, the Internet and the a rapidly growing global middle class snapping up air conditioners and stainless steel woks, we’ll need 600 million tonnes of copper over the next 20 years, “and we don’t know where it’s going to come from,” he warned. Lamenting popular ignorance about the supply chain, Friedland complained that people “have no idea where things come from. “Americans think a ham sandwich comes out of a refrigerator. No one thinks about what it’s like to slaughter 50 million pigs a year to deliver that ham sandwich.” Voisey’s Bay Friedland’s two major claims to fame are the discovery of the nickel-rich Voisey’s Bay deposit by Diamond Fields Resources, which he sold to Inco for $4.3 billion in 1996, and Oyu Tolgoi in Mongolia, one of the world’s largest copper-gold porphyry deposits. Shares of his company, Diamond Fields Resources, skyrocketed from $1 to $161, and when the price hit $40, a columnist in Canada’s Globe and Mail newspaper wrote “a nasty article” telling investors they “might as well go to Nevada and roll the dice,” Friedland recalled. “However, anyone buying Diamond Fields shares when the article was published quadrupled their money in five months. “Everybody said Inco paid too much for Voisey’s Bay, but in 1996 China hadn’t been invented yet and we didn’t know that Mrs. Wong would want a stainless steel wok, so by the time Voisey’s Bay came on stream, it was worth every nickel.” Oyu Tolgoi, which was gradually acquired by Rio Tinto and began shipping copper this past summer, contains an estimated resource of 2.7 million tonnes of copper and 1.7 million ounces of gold. Its number two shaft is 10 metres in diameter and has a hoisting capacity of 50,000 tonnes a day, he said. Ultimately, production from Oyu Tolgoi will increase to 300,000 tonnes per day from a total of seven shafts, he predicted. Far from resting on his laurels, Friedland has a trio of new projects in Africa focusing on platinum, copper and zinc. The Platreef platinum-nickel-copper deposit in the South African province of Limpopo boasts a NI 43-101 compliant indicated resource of 214 million tonnes grading 4.1 g/t platinum, palladium, gold and rhodium. The orebody is perfectly flat with a thickness of 24 metres and open in every direction. “If you go to a typical platinum mine today, you crawl for a kilometre or two on your hands and knees to get to the working face. The rock is 50 degrees Celsius and the humidity is close to 100 per cent. You can’t stand up and there’s virtually no ventilation. “How can Toyota Motor Corporation build a new generation of fuel cell vehicles to clean up the air in China and the U.S. when platinum is mined like that?” he asked. “This discovery is much bigger than Bre-X, but it has the distinct advantage of being real and it’s remarkable how many people are not noticing it.” Friedland attributed the lack of interest to a bias against Africa and the public perception of a continent full of “bushmen, blowguns and lions.” Indeed, geopolitical risk is one of the reasons cited, along with the downturn in the mining sector as a whole, for a close to 50 per cent plunge in Ivanhoe’s share price this year. Actually, “Limpopo is a very civilized place, a very beautiful part of the world with friendly, intelligent people,” Friedland said. Congo Ivanhoe Metals also has two projects in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Kamoa copper deposit 25 kilometres west of Kolwezi boasts a mineral resource estimate of 739 million tonnes grading 2.9 per cent copper, while the Kipushi Big Zinc project boasts grades averaging 11 per cent zinc and seven per cent copper. Kamoa, said Friedland “is a transformative orebody,” but “we need 20 more of them.” The Goodman School of Mines can play a role in preparing Africa for the next wave of mineral development, said Friedland. “They’re not going to be down there with a jackleg making $12 a day,” he said. “They’re going to be driving air-conditioned equipment like in Sudbury and will be paid like dental surgeons.” www.ivanhoemines.com
  18. 18. TOTTEN mine www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013 19 Team Totten rises to challenge n round conditions, G water ingress and a 60-year-old timbered shaft among the challenges overcome BY NORM TOLLINSKY When Bob Booth and Gary Annett of the Totten project team hand over the reins to mine manager Dave Pisaric on December 31st, life won’t be near as exciting. Few mine development projects go exactly as planned. Mother Nature can frustrate the intentions of the most experienced and skilled engineers and geoscientists, as happened at Totten when unfavourable ground conditions and water ingress began bogging things down. The team stepped it up a notch, hunkered down…and saw it through. Vale decided against the engineering, procurement and construction management (EPCM) approach and kept the project management in house. Annett, with the ominous title of Totten execution manager, was assigned to Totten in February 2008. A 15-year Vale and Inco mining engineer and alumnus of Laurentian University, Annett worked his way up through operations and spent eight years at the company’s Coleman Mine. Bob Booth, a 23-year veteran, transferred from operations to project management in 2000. He oversaw the Creighton Deep project from 2000 to 2007, served in several senior engineering and management roles both in Thompson, Manitoba and Sudbury, and was assigned to the Totten team as project manager in February 2011. Keeping project management in-house eliminates a third party from the equation, allowing for quicker decisions when challenges are encountered, said Booth. The size of the team has to be appropriate though. “When you bring in an EPCM team, you bring on a full suite of systems. When I arrived, there was a very small team here, so we had to grow it and the robustness of the systems to be able to deliver,” said Booth. The project team defined a new level of excellence and trumpeted the “One team, one way to zero harm” mantra to the 500 workers from multiple contractors crossing paths and interacting at the site. “The colour of your coveralls didn’t Totten Mine administration building features main floor entrance to drys with underground Vale Archive. Miningindustrialphotographer.com corridor for access to cage. matter,” said Booth. “It didn’t matter if you worked for this engineering company or some other engineering company, Cementation, SCR, Technica. It was about all working toward the same goal. That’s what made us successful. It was a team effort from everyone.” One of the key indices of excellence in the mining industry is safety, and on this score, the results were world-class, said Booth. 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  19. 19. 20 December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal NEWS www.sudburyminingsolutions.com
  20. 20. www.sudburyminingsolutions.com TOTTEN mine Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013 ... one team, one way to zero harm gets results From Page 19 – an 18-tonne skip, a second 15-tonne skip with an underslung cage for 17 and The mine development process began a two-deck Marianne accommodating in 2006 with the construction of a eight people in tight quarters. wastewater treatment plant. There are five levels off the shaft, but “We had to complete the wastewater only two main mining levels – 3150 and treatment plant before we could pump 3850. out one millilitre of water from the Totten had very limited lateral develmine workings,” said Annett. opment. The plant, designed by AMEC, “There was some development on the pumped out one million gallons of upper levels, but we aren’t using any water from the mine, clearing the way of it,” said Annett. “We’re going after for a thorough inspection of the shaft. deeper ore.” The Totten Number 2 The project team oversaw timbered shaft descends 43,200 feet of lateral devel4,130 feet. The challenge opment, which was comwas to take a 47-year-old pleted in August of this year. shaft and make it like new, “We went a bit smaller said Booth. - 14 x14-feet for the drifts “We don’t build timand 14 x 16-feet for the bered shafts anymore, so ramps – because of the we had to find the right smaller equipment we’ll be people to do this type of using – 30-tonne trucks and work. We were lucky to have six-yard scoops instead of Bob Booth, project Cementation on board. 50-tonne trucks and eightmanager, Team Totten They had some experienced yard scoops,” said Annett. old-timers who understand Cementation drilled two timbered shafts.” ventilation raises from surThe timbers weren’t in face to the 1850 level – an bad shape, said Booth. 18-foot diameter fresh air Immersion in water was raise and a 16-foot return actually a good thing air raise. Beyond the 1850 because they didn’t dry out. level, Redpath’s raiseboring A thorough classificagroup drilled several fresh tion of the ground was and return air raises to the performed and appropriate 3150 and 3850 levels – ground support installed to mostly 12-footers except for stabilize challenging ground Gary Annett, execution one 16-foot return air raise conditions, including manager, Team Totten between the 3150 and 3850 ‘bookcasing’. levels. “We weren’t able to use modern-day A rebuilt Pitnam crusher on 3880 ground support with screen and bolts, level will be more than sufficient to so we created concrete wall sets,” said handle eventual output of 2,200 tonnes Booth. “We classified the whole shaft per day. from surface to the 1850-level to decide From a project management perspecthe treatment that would be required tive, the main challenge, aside from the to reduce risk based on the ground in ground conditions and water ingress, certain areas.” Beyond the 1850 level, was the sequencing of all the construcconcrete rings lined the shaft. tion in the shaft with the delivery and The nine-foot by 18-foot shaft is ser- installation of the infrastructure underviced by a 16.5-foot Davey-Markham ground, said Booth. hoist and two conveyances supplied “I think we’re both going to be bored by FLSmidth and Stainless Steel when we move on to the next project.” Technology. There are two conveyances Totten Mine will ramp up to a daily output of 2,200 tonnes. WORLD’S PREMIER MINING TIRE SPECIALISTS Built on a reputation for innovation, reliability and providing outstanding service safely for over 40 years, Kal Tire’s Mining Tire Group is the world’s leading earthmover and mining tire specialist. Kal Tire delivers 24-hour onsite service and tire maintenance, tire supply and wealth of retread manufacturing experience to underground and on-surface customers. Providing local support through global strength, customers are safe in the knowledge that their tires are in the best hands possible. INTERESTED Visit www.kaltire.com/careers or email northamerica@kaltire.com for information 120 Smelter Road Box 382 Coniston, ON P0M 1M0 Tel: (705) 694-3788 www. kaltiremining.com 21
  21. 21. 22 December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal TOTTEN mine www.sudburyminingsolutions.com ... Vale’s sixth operating mine in Sudbury Basin From Page 1 Meanwhile, the price of nickel went on a wild rollercoaster ride from $9 per pound in 2006, peaking at $24 per pound in 2007, then plunging to just over $4 in 2008. Vale’s sixth operating mine in the Sudbury Basin, Totten will ramp up to a production output of 2,200 tonnes per day, representing 10 per cent of the feed to the company’s Clarabelle Mill. “We’ll start up at 500 tonnes per day, but as we get into different ore zones, we’ll get up to full capacity by 20152016,” said Strong. A polymetallic orebody with “some good copper and nickel grades and precious metals,” Totten will initially result in a slight increase in production from Vale’s Sudbury operations, noted Strong. Over time, however, Totten and other mine development projects in the pipeline “will replace some of the ore we’ve been depleting, so our production levels will remain relatively stable over the next 10 years.” Thanks largely to the deployment of advanced technology, Totten will be “at the lower end of the cost curve in comparison with other mines,” said Strong. “It’s a leaner operation that enables us to unlock some of the value in the reserves and resources we have. Once we get Totten running, we’ll look at imple- Kelly Strong, vice-president of Ontario and UK operations, Vale. menting some of these technologies in our other five mines, as well as in future mine projects.” Totten was also noteworthy in that it was the first time Vale (or Inco) has negotiated an impact benefit agreement with a First Nation. Located 70 kilometres west of Totten, the Sagamok First Nation benefits from business, training and employment opportunities. “The agreement allows both Sagamok and Vale to see the success of Totten, so we’re very happy to be associated with Chief Paul Eshkakogan and his community,” said Strong. Totten’s sterling safety record is another source of pride for Vale and suppliers who have worked at the site. Earlier this year, the development team celebrated one million man hours of work without a lost time injury, “a significant achievement considering the environment they worked in and the multiple contractors doing very unique, non-standard work,” said Strong. The one-team philosophy adopted by Vale is cited as one of the main reasons for Totten’s safety record. “It didn’t matter if your hard hat said Vale, Cementation or some other company,” said Strong. “Everybody was part of one team.” Also contributing to the success of the project was the Sudbury area’s supplier community. Dozens of Sudbury and North Bay suppliers participated in the project, including Cementation, Redpath, Technica Mining and SCR Mining and Tunnelling. “We’re blessed with having so many suppliers of equipment and material right in our backyard,” said Strong. Totten provided a major boost to the local economy with upwards of 500 workers on site during construction, and 200 permanent jobs going forward. Vale’s commitment to the Sudbury Basin goes beyond Totten, said Strong, pointing to the recently completed $200 million Challenging Ore Recovery project at Clarabelle Mill and the ongoing $1.1 billion Clean AER project at the company’s Copper Cliff smelter. These, together with future mine expansion and development projects at the company’s Creighton and Copper Cliff mines, demonstrate “that we’re going to be here for a long time,” said Strong. 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  22. 22. TOTTEN mine www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal ■ December 1, 2013 Totten boasts 21st Century control system n Mine of the future What makes Totten “a mine of the future” has just about everything to do with data and communication. Tying together the headframe, the hoist, the crusher, the mobile production equipment, the ventilation fans, the backfill plant and all the other mine infrastructure is Totten’s distributed control system (DCS). “Most mines in Sudbury use programmable logic controllers (PLCs),” said Jack McIssac, Totten automation and electrical lead. “PLCs are standalone smart boxes that control individual parts of the process. A crusher station will have a PLC, same with the conveyor belts and the hoist. The distributed control system pulls everything together into one system. “The advantages of a DCS are that it’s easier to maintain, easier to program and implement the logic in the field, and easier to troubleshoot. It’s also easier to transfer data from one system to another.” Want to know the performance details of a pump? Easy. Go to a workstation, “The advantages of a DCS are that it’s easier to maintain, easier to program and implement the logic in the field, and easier to troubleshoot. It’s also easier to transfer data from one system to another.” – Jack McIsaac, Automation and Production Lead, Totten Mine click on the piece of equipment and drill down for real-time performance values. Everything comes together in a futuristic control room in the mine’s spacious administration building, where a single operator sits at a long, curved desk with a wall-to-wall array of computer screens and video monitors. Flow charts and bar graphs provide a visual representation of each process, along with operational metrics, and Jack McIssac, automation and production lead, at a controller for one of Totten’s two surface fans. large overhead monitors display highdefinition video from cameras installed throughout the mine. The desks, the monitors and the overhead lighting can be raised, lowered or otherwise adjusted with the push of a button. “In the control room, we can monitor every instrument, every pump, every valve,” said McIssac. If a piece of equipment deviates from normal operating parameters, an alarm is triggered, alerting the operator and other designated staff, who can then drill down to see the status of the equipment and take appropriate action. “We would still have the same capability at a central control facility, but DCS makes it easier to provide information to the control room. It’s a very simple process, whereas with PLCs, there’s a lot of work behind the scenes to get to that point,” said McIsaac. WORKING TOGETHER TO CHANGE THE GAME TopRops and MPI have come together to offer you the best possible products above and below ground Level 2 ROPS/FOPS certified A/C available on all trucks Industry Proven Vehicles Quad cabs now available Other Great Products MPI is a proud distributor for TOPROPS www.toprops.com 1-800-267-4728 www.mobileparts.com 1-800-461-4055 23
  23. 23. 24 TOTTEN mine December 1, 2013 ■ Sudbury Mining Solutions Journal www.sudburyminingsolutions.com Advanced technology drives efficiencies n Ventilation on demand, blasting and surveying innovations BY NORM TOLLINSKY Overseeing mine planning, execution and scheduling at a brand new mine is a once in a lifetime experience. For Erick Jarvi, it’s a dream come true. A Laurentian University mining engineering grad, Jarvi joined Inco in 1997 as a production miner at the company’s Levack Mine. He spent four years as an hourly employee and six years as a production supervisor at Coleman before transferring into engineering at Creighton Mine. Starting at the bottom and working your way up isn’t unusual given the cyclical nature of the mining industry and the difficulty of landing an engineering job in a down market. In Jarvi’s case, the wealth of experience he gained at the face paid off in January when he was appointed chief mine engineer at Totten. Hailed as “a mine of the future,” Totten offers Vale an opportunity to introduce cutting-edge technology for ground control, ventilation and surveying, all of which are overseen by the chief mine engineer. Blasthole stoping The vertically dipping orebody lends itself to blasthole stoping, a mining method which is commonly used across the Sudbury Basin, said Jarvi. “We’re looking at lift heights of 120 to 140 feet and we incorporate a four-foot raisebore slot raise coupled with 4.5inch in-the-hole production drilling, so our average stopes range from 15,000 to 30,000 tonnes. The Totten production fleet will include Redbore 40 raise drills and two fully automatic Atlas Copco Simba in-the-hole drills. The load-haul-dump machines are six-yard Elphinstone Caterpillar units. Variable speed surface fans provides a maximum volume of 790,000 cfm of air to mine’s underground workings. “The purpose (of ventilationon-demand) isn’t necessarily to save power, but to maximize efficiency. It ensures that ventilation is being used efficiently across the mine and drastically improves blast clearing time…” – Erick Jarvi, Chief Mine Engineer, Totten Mine Resin rebar will be used for primary ground support along with some dynamic support where warranted. “We have a couple areas where we intersect a trap dyke, so we use the trap Vale Archive. Miningindustrialphotographer.com dyke protocol there,” said Jarvi. “We to direct air based on the detection of also have a very advanced ESG Solutions RFID tags installed on mobile equipment microseismic system that provides real- and in miners cap lamps. time source location.” “The purpose isn’t necessarily to save The microseismic system is monitored power, but to maximize efficiency,” from Totten’s control room and said Jarvi. “It ensures that ventilation is from several computers being used efficiently across underground in active the mine and drastically working areas, allowing improves blast clearing time control room staff and by shutting off areas where production supervisors to air is flowing for nothing visualize seismic activity in and focusing on where the real time. ventilation is really needed.” “If there’s an event, we The system is able to can identify the magnitude distinguish between an and location, and make sure LHD and a personnel carrier workers are out of harm’s Erick Jarvi, chief mine and adjust the volume of air way,” said Jarvi. accordingly. engineer, Totten Mine A ventilation-on-demand Totten is also pioneering system from Simsmart new technology for Technologies controls louvers and surveying, having opted for the Miner modulates fans with variable speed drives Operated Survey System (MOSS). FABRITHANE INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTS INC. Custom molding of polyurethane, rubber and fibreglass parts for mining, construction, forestry, woodland, pump paper industries. Pump and Flotation Miscellaneous Molding and relining of pump flotation parts. Denver, Flyght, Galiger, Sala, SRL, Wemco, etc. Larox filter replacement parts: Roller seals, roller scrapers, Larox pinch valve sleeves, plus sheave liners, sheave wheel liners, skip wheels, belt scrapers, rollers, seals, gaskets, bumpers, screens, chute liners, impact blocks, suspension pads, hose clamps, sprockets, pinch valve sleeves, Salt spinners, wear strips, Krebs cyclone replacement parts, Warman Vortex Finders, etc. Jean-Guy Perreault. President/Owner/Operator 6, 10th Ave. North P.O. Box 68, Earlton, Ont. P0J 1E0 Tel: (705) 563-2223 / 1-866-664-2223 Fax: (705) 563-8201 Tooling department on site for mold design and fabrication of any parts you may require, plus custom fabrication, rubber lining etc. Please do not hesitate in contacting us with any of your requirements for any parts or application not listed above. www.fabrithane.com E-Mail: fabrithane@ntl.sympatico.ca

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