How Progress Bars change the way we live Evan Jones - Stitch Media SXSW 2011 Presentation
By the end of this presentation, I will be 70% naked. Hashtag: #progressbar
Progress Bars are much older than computers
Progress Bars are much older than computers
Progress Bars are much older than computers
Progress Bars are much older than computers
Progress Bars are much older than computers
Progress Bars are much older than computers
First progress bar? Progress Bars are much older than computers
20% Naked
Commandments of the Perfect Progress Bar
The First Commandment Thy progress bar shall be quantified  and have an endpoint.
Blasphemy!
The Second Commandment Thy progression must always be forward.  None shall reverse or reset to zero
 
30% Naked
The hierarchy of motion is thus: Acceleration >  Constant Speed >  Deceleration >  Unpredictable Speed The Third Commandment
Peak & End Effects affect perception of time Speed Duration Acceleration feels faster than constant motion
Pulses that increase in frequency as bar proceeds Ripples moving backwards from the leading edge Illusions trick our perce...
The Fourth Commandment Thou must do something after thy progress bar has completed.
Blasphemy!
The Fifth Commandment Thou shalt tell the user  why he may not proceed. BONUS: Thou shalt make use of the  waiting time wi...
Progress Bars are now a meta-layer to media
40% Naked
Progress Bars are motivators
Gamification 1. Set up a goal 2. Give tools to reach it  3. Reward them when they do
Sites using progress bars to motivate action
50% Naked
Progress bars  create tension. We crave resolution.
Cognitive Dissonance
60% Naked
A progress bar is a black box They are good at making hidden processes understandable
Black boxes in our lives Airport Delays Waiting Rooms Postal Service Traffic Lights Oven Timers Retirement Savings
Will Progress Bars exist in our future? Moore's law is making black boxes invisible Shift now from machine-focus to people...
We're not good at quantifying everything. We're unpredictable. We don't always know when things are complete. People break...
(The last 30% is really the only part that counts) It's not always quantity. Sometimes it's about quality. Jacket Shoes So...
To achieve 100% completion Questions? Let me know what you thought Reach me @stitchmedia www.stitchmedia.ca Thanks to: Chr...
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How Progress Bars change the way we live - SXSW presentation

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Once upon a time slow connections begat the Progress Bar - bloated sites would taunt us with '15% loaded' screens. High-speed promised to kill the beast and free us from their tyranny but yet it lives! Progress bars are being used MORE lately to direct user actions. Look to Farmville and LinkedIn which push their users to collect 100% of their personal information. Incomplete progress bars are an itch that needs to be scratched. They carry the implicit language that declares 'You are here' but more importantly 'The end is in sight'. Game design motivates us through incremental, measurable progress towards a tangible goal but is this the way real life works? Is the progress bar's ubiquity in technology starting to affect the way we measure progress in meatspace? This panel will reach far across time and space to look at the story of progress bars, why they hypnotize us and what we need to do - slay the beast once and for all, or throw ourselves into its partially-complete embrace...

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  • http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_CwRFd-m9Knk/TRzoW5tHJcI/AAAAAAAACis/YGeePhp9mF8/s1600/DSC_0039.JPG http://www.thelongestway.com/2007/12/05 http://jasonanddeb.blogspot.com/2010/12/christmas-eve-festivities.html
  • In fact the earliest progress bars were called thermometers when the metaphor moved to computers.
  • http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Candle_clock http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/2/2f/Kerzenuhr.jpg The most famous candle clock was invented by  King Alfred the Great of England  in 878. King Alfred created a device that utilized six candles. The candles were made from 72 pennyweights of wax and were each 12 inch tall and of equal thickness. Each candle had 12 one-inch markings which represented a block of time and burned away in four hours. The candles were placed in wooden cases with transparent horn panels. King Alfred used his candle clock to organize the time he spent on monarchy duties, prayer and study. Read more at Suite101:  Candle Clocks: An Early Method of Telling Time   http://www.suite101.com/content/candle-clocks-a99480#ixzz1D0YyJqZg
  • Our ability to track a steadily moving object goes all the way back to spear throwing
  • Pickpockets can't move in straight lines because we're too good at predicting endpoint Consider a technique used by the legendary pickpocket Apollo Robbins , another coauthor of the Nature article spearheaded by Macknik and Martinez-Conde. When the researchers asked him about his devious methods—how he could steal the wallet of a man who  knew  he was going to have his pocket picked—they learned something surprising: Robbins said the trick worked only when he moved his free hand in an arc instead of a straight line. According to the thief, these arcs distract the eyes of his victims for a matter of milliseconds, just enough time for his other hand to pilfer their belongings. At first, the scientists couldn't explain this phenomenon. Why would arcs keep us from looking at the right place? But then they began to think about saccades, movements of the eye that can precede conscious decisions about where to turn one's gaze. Saccades are among the fastest movements produced by the human body, which is why a pickpocket has to trick them: The eyes are in fact quicker than the hands. "This is an idea scientists had never contemplated before," Macknik says. "It turns out, though, that the pickpocket was onto something." When we see a hand moving in a straight line, we automatically look toward the end point—this is called the pursuit system. A hand moving in a semicircle, however, seems to short-circuit our saccades. The arc doesn't tell our eyes where the hand is going, so we fixate on the hand itself—and fail to notice the other hand reaching into our pocket. "The pickpocket has found a weakness in the way we perceive motion," Macknik says. "Show the eyes an arc and they move differently." http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/magazine/17-05/ff_neuroscienceofmagic?currentPage=3
  • NEED: photo of SXSW registration queue http://www.flickr.com/photos/24502778@N06/2318590593/ http://www.flickr.com/photos/markjaquith/2356705159/sizes/l/in/photostream/
  • Progress must be quantifiable and there must be an endpoint. (Throbbers are out) Slightly overestimate if endpoint unknown (not really perfect though)
  • These are TERRIBLE progress bars. They are actually called THROBBERS, although they used to be called HEARTBEATs Thermometer was a bad metaphor, but Heartbeat was a great metaphor http://www.thecollaredsheep.com/the-passive-aggressive-windows-hourglass/ http://arstechnica.com/apple/reviews/2009/08/mac-os-x-10-6.ars/11 Throbbers increase frustration just like waiting at an airport. you don't know anything and so you don't expect an end in sight.
  • http://www.swiss-miss.com/2010/12/progress-bar-illusion-3.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+Swissmiss+(swissmiss) http://www.newscientist.com/blogs/nstv/2010/12/best-videos-of-2010-progress-bar-illusion.html
  • Something happens at the end. Action is triggered upon completion Key is - something has to happen when 100% is reached - progress bars measure overall progress to trigger something else - new action is initiated.  
  • LinkedIn and others that use progress bars to motivate completion are a trick because nothing with happen when you hit 100%
  • It's an itch that needs to be scratched. We LOVE making incremental progress towards a goal. (look up gamification link to this). Example is an aborted countdown – we crave the resolution of tension.
  • We don't want to know what's happening – just how long between input and output. Set it and forget it layers of abstraction? Civilization advances by extending the number of important operations which we can perform without thinking about them. Alfred North Whitehead ,  Introduction to Mathematics (1911) English mathematician & philosopher (1861 – 1947)
  • Modularization?
  • How Progress Bars change the way we live - SXSW presentation

    1. How Progress Bars change the way we live Evan Jones - Stitch Media SXSW 2011 Presentation
    2. By the end of this presentation, I will be 70% naked. Hashtag: #progressbar
    3. Progress Bars are much older than computers
    4. Progress Bars are much older than computers
    5. Progress Bars are much older than computers
    6. Progress Bars are much older than computers
    7. Progress Bars are much older than computers
    8. Progress Bars are much older than computers
    9. First progress bar? Progress Bars are much older than computers
    10. 20% Naked
    11. Commandments of the Perfect Progress Bar
    12. The First Commandment Thy progress bar shall be quantified and have an endpoint.
    13. Blasphemy!
    14. The Second Commandment Thy progression must always be forward. None shall reverse or reset to zero
    15.  
    16. 30% Naked
    17. The hierarchy of motion is thus: Acceleration > Constant Speed > Deceleration > Unpredictable Speed The Third Commandment
    18. Peak & End Effects affect perception of time Speed Duration Acceleration feels faster than constant motion
    19. Pulses that increase in frequency as bar proceeds Ripples moving backwards from the leading edge Illusions trick our perception of time
    20. The Fourth Commandment Thou must do something after thy progress bar has completed.
    21. Blasphemy!
    22. The Fifth Commandment Thou shalt tell the user why he may not proceed. BONUS: Thou shalt make use of the waiting time with relevant information
    23. Progress Bars are now a meta-layer to media
    24. 40% Naked
    25. Progress Bars are motivators
    26. Gamification 1. Set up a goal 2. Give tools to reach it 3. Reward them when they do
    27. Sites using progress bars to motivate action
    28. 50% Naked
    29. Progress bars create tension. We crave resolution.
    30. Cognitive Dissonance
    31. 60% Naked
    32. A progress bar is a black box They are good at making hidden processes understandable
    33. Black boxes in our lives Airport Delays Waiting Rooms Postal Service Traffic Lights Oven Timers Retirement Savings
    34. Will Progress Bars exist in our future? Moore's law is making black boxes invisible Shift now from machine-focus to people-focus
    35. We're not good at quantifying everything. We're unpredictable. We don't always know when things are complete. People break The Commandments
    36. (The last 30% is really the only part that counts) It's not always quantity. Sometimes it's about quality. Jacket Shoes Socks Necktie Belt Dress Shirt Watch T-Shirt Pants Underwear
    37. To achieve 100% completion Questions? Let me know what you thought Reach me @stitchmedia www.stitchmedia.ca Thanks to: Chris Harrison, Carnegie Mellon Many others who discussed these ideas

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