Triage Course For Sexual Health Clinic Intake Staff Part 1

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What is Sexual Health …

What is Sexual Health
Maintaining Personal and Professional Boundaries

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  • http://www.springerlink.com/content/t8259n215884jm25/Why people have sex – see above linkHow we learn about sex http://www.avert.org/learning-sex.htm
  • Sex in Australia – Summary findings of the Australian Study of Health and Relationshipshttp://www.dialog.unimelb.edu.au/lesbian/pdf/sex%20in%20australia%20summary%204.03.pdf
  • 1http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/stigma accessed 17 Dec 2010.2Goffman E., (1963) Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity, Prentice-Hall, 19633Richters,J. Grulich, A., de Vissler R.O. Smith, A., & Rissel, C.E. Sex in Australia: Autoerotic and other sexual practices engaged in by a representative sample of adults. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health Vol 27, Issue 2, p 180-190, April 2003.
  • WHO (2002) Defining Sexual Health Report on a technical consultation on sexual health 28-31 January 2002 Geneva
  • http://www.ehow.com/how_4833986_understand-maintain-healthy-personal-boundaries.htmlhttp://www.google.com.au/url?q=http://www.nmb.nsw.gov.au/ArticleDocuments/98/Boundaries_Prof_Practice.pdf.aspx&ei=ug85Te7QJoWglAeVlpCnBw&sa=X&oi=unauthorizedredirect&ct=targetlink&ust=1295587010636053&usg=AFQjCNHVER21faHKWxX1OKjWZZ9Wjls1wA8 Principles for Effectively Maintaining Professional Boundaries as a Service ProviderSolid working relationships need rapport and trust to function well. Certainly as a service provider, it’s your job to make sure your customers feel at ease with approaching you, relating to you and considering your advice.Relationship-building, however, should not come at the expense of your credibility, effectiveness, health and personal life. Successful (and ethical!) working relationships are anchored on a clear understanding of what your role is and what your role isn’t. Even if your work has personal meaning to you, you have to maintain professional boundaries.Here are some principles to consider when establishing and maintaining professional boundaries:Empower Not RescueYour role is to assist your customers in achieving their goals.  Point them in the right direction, nurture the attitude needed, give them encouragement--- but don’t do the work for them! You may feel that you’re being helpful when you do so, but you may be robbing them of the opportunity to learn and the satisfaction of accomplishment. Remember, everyone’s capable of solutions; don’t assume your customers are any different.Take Care of YourselfDo you want to know how to get on the path to job burn-out? It’s in not knowing where work ends and where personal life begins.  Even from the onset, set clear working hours and respect those hours. Don’t take work home and turn the cell phone off!  If an issue about a customer is weighing you down, debrief by talking to a co-worker or your supervisor. There’s nothing wrong with setting reasonable limitations for your customers (and for yourself!).  This doesn’t mean you’re providing bad customer service.  It’s about taking care of yourself.Service Time is Not “Me” TimeWhile the rule is not to self disclose, only do so when it substantiates a point that addresses a customer’s needs.  Don’t use your relationship as an opportunity to vent your feelings.  In fact, rule of thumb: just listen! Active listening places the proper focus on your customers’ needs. It also creates an environment of trust.  If you talk or share too much, the customer may feel like you’re more of a “friend” versus an advisor.  This will ultimately change the dynamics of your relationship as a service provider.Don’t Open Your WalletWhile this may seem obvious, it’s very easy for this to happen, especially when someone is operating on good intentions.  Discipline yourself to only use available program funds.  This includes providing change for vending machines, sharing cigarettes or even food.  Unfortunately, as much as we’d like, we can’t be everything for our customers.  If additional funding or resources are needed, utilize your partners.  Also take the time to find out what additional resources are available within your community.Don’t Shift From Service-Provider to EmployerSimilar to the previous principle, don’t ask customers to perform personal services or work for you, even if it’s for pay. This may represent a serious conflict of interest that could cost you your job.  It also limits opportunities for your customers to pursue competitive employment and may be seen as favoritism.  Moving away from what feels “safe” (e.g. working with your agency) may be difficult, but with your encouragement your customers have the confidence to explore other employment opportunities.Be ConsistentConsistency is at the core of an effective professional relationship. Always do what you say you’re going to do.  If necessary, underpromise and overdeliver! You need to be someone that your customers can count on.  Also be sure to treat each customer with the same kindness and respect --- no matter how difficult this may be.Be a Role ModelCustomers look up to you so you need to lead by example.  Never exhibit behavior that is unprofessional, such as using profanity or taking advantage of your position to influence others.  Always be on time for appointments and keep meetings concise and to the point.  Keep the best interests of the customer in mind and always remember, especially when working with youth, that you are being seen as the “expert.”  It may not seem like it at times, but you are an authority in what you do.Be AccountableWhen working in a community setting, it’s easy to get lost, emotionally and professionally, in the systems that you’re assisting. Stay in touch with an anchor who can give you feedback, perhaps a co-worker. Never keep information from your supervisors; keep them updated with successes and challenges. No one likes to be caught off guard. If you’re not certain what to do, consult with your supervisor.While setting boundaries may feel like too much work, or even feel artificial, they’re a necessary element in becoming a better service provider. Boundaries sustain your energy and develop others’. They enhance the service process in running more efficiently and effectively.  As with any relationship, if you have a clear grasp of who you are, and consequently who your customers are, the lines of communication will remain clearly understood.http://www.articlesbase.com/human-resources-articles/8-principles-for-effectively-maintaining-professional-boundaries-as-a-service-provider-1293358.htmlLisa Jordan is a disability and workforce development expert. Lisa uses her keen ability to identify challenges and develop solutions so that workforce development professionals can increase their comfort level, productivity and effectiveness when working with a diverse clientele. Download Lisa’s Special Report on 5 Easy Disability Tips to Immediately Increase Agency Accessibility by visiting http://www.human-solutions.netRead more: http://www.articlesbase.com/human-resources-articles/8-principles-for-effectively-maintaining-professional-boundaries-as-a-service-provider-1293358.html#ixzz1BdwmzzwDUnder Creative Commons License: Attribution
  • http://www.ehow.com/how_4833986_understand-maintain-healthy-personal-boundaries.htmlhttp://www.google.com.au/url?q=http://www.nmb.nsw.gov.au/ArticleDocuments/98/Boundaries_Prof_Practice.pdf.aspx&ei=ug85Te7QJoWglAeVlpCnBw&sa=X&oi=unauthorizedredirect&ct=targetlink&ust=1295587010636053&usg=AFQjCNHVER21faHKWxX1OKjWZZ9Wjls1wA8 Principles for Effectively Maintaining Professional Boundaries as a Service ProviderSolid working relationships need rapport and trust to function well. Certainly as a service provider, it’s your job to make sure your customers feel at ease with approaching you, relating to you and considering your advice.Relationship-building, however, should not come at the expense of your credibility, effectiveness, health and personal life. Successful (and ethical!) working relationships are anchored on a clear understanding of what your role is and what your role isn’t. Even if your work has personal meaning to you, you have to maintain professional boundaries.Here are some principles to consider when establishing and maintaining professional boundaries:Empower Not RescueYour role is to assist your customers in achieving their goals.  Point them in the right direction, nurture the attitude needed, give them encouragement--- but don’t do the work for them! You may feel that you’re being helpful when you do so, but you may be robbing them of the opportunity to learn and the satisfaction of accomplishment. Remember, everyone’s capable of solutions; don’t assume your customers are any different.Take Care of YourselfDo you want to know how to get on the path to job burn-out? It’s in not knowing where work ends and where personal life begins.  Even from the onset, set clear working hours and respect those hours. Don’t take work home and turn the cell phone off!  If an issue about a customer is weighing you down, debrief by talking to a co-worker or your supervisor. There’s nothing wrong with setting reasonable limitations for your customers (and for yourself!).  This doesn’t mean you’re providing bad customer service.  It’s about taking care of yourself.Service Time is Not “Me” TimeWhile the rule is not to self disclose, only do so when it substantiates a point that addresses a customer’s needs.  Don’t use your relationship as an opportunity to vent your feelings.  In fact, rule of thumb: just listen! Active listening places the proper focus on your customers’ needs. It also creates an environment of trust.  If you talk or share too much, the customer may feel like you’re more of a “friend” versus an advisor.  This will ultimately change the dynamics of your relationship as a service provider.Don’t Open Your WalletWhile this may seem obvious, it’s very easy for this to happen, especially when someone is operating on good intentions.  Discipline yourself to only use available program funds.  This includes providing change for vending machines, sharing cigarettes or even food.  Unfortunately, as much as we’d like, we can’t be everything for our customers.  If additional funding or resources are needed, utilize your partners.  Also take the time to find out what additional resources are available within your community.Don’t Shift From Service-Provider to EmployerSimilar to the previous principle, don’t ask customers to perform personal services or work for you, even if it’s for pay. This may represent a serious conflict of interest that could cost you your job.  It also limits opportunities for your customers to pursue competitive employment and may be seen as favoritism.  Moving away from what feels “safe” (e.g. working with your agency) may be difficult, but with your encouragement your customers have the confidence to explore other employment opportunities.Be ConsistentConsistency is at the core of an effective professional relationship. Always do what you say you’re going to do.  If necessary, underpromise and overdeliver! You need to be someone that your customers can count on.  Also be sure to treat each customer with the same kindness and respect --- no matter how difficult this may be.Be a Role ModelCustomers look up to you so you need to lead by example.  Never exhibit behavior that is unprofessional, such as using profanity or taking advantage of your position to influence others.  Always be on time for appointments and keep meetings concise and to the point.  Keep the best interests of the customer in mind and always remember, especially when working with youth, that you are being seen as the “expert.”  It may not seem like it at times, but you are an authority in what you do.Be AccountableWhen working in a community setting, it’s easy to get lost, emotionally and professionally, in the systems that you’re assisting. Stay in touch with an anchor who can give you feedback, perhaps a co-worker. Never keep information from your supervisors; keep them updated with successes and challenges. No one likes to be caught off guard. If you’re not certain what to do, consult with your supervisor.While setting boundaries may feel like too much work, or even feel artificial, they’re a necessary element in becoming a better service provider. Boundaries sustain your energy and develop others’. They enhance the service process in running more efficiently and effectively.  As with any relationship, if you have a clear grasp of who you are, and consequently who your customers are, the lines of communication will remain clearly understood.http://www.articlesbase.com/human-resources-articles/8-principles-for-effectively-maintaining-professional-boundaries-as-a-service-provider-1293358.htmlLisa Jordan is a disability and workforce development expert. Lisa uses her keen ability to identify challenges and develop solutions so that workforce development professionals can increase their comfort level, productivity and effectiveness when working with a diverse clientele. Download Lisa’s Special Report on 5 Easy Disability Tips to Immediately Increase Agency Accessibility by visiting http://www.human-solutions.netRead more: http://www.articlesbase.com/human-resources-articles/8-principles-for-effectively-maintaining-professional-boundaries-as-a-service-provider-1293358.html#ixzz1BdwmzzwDUnder Creative Commons License: Attribution
  • http://www.ehow.com/how_4833986_understand-maintain-healthy-personal-boundaries.htmlhttp://www.google.com.au/url?q=http://www.nmb.nsw.gov.au/ArticleDocuments/98/Boundaries_Prof_Practice.pdf.aspx&ei=ug85Te7QJoWglAeVlpCnBw&sa=X&oi=unauthorizedredirect&ct=targetlink&ust=1295587010636053&usg=AFQjCNHVER21faHKWxX1OKjWZZ9Wjls1wA8 Principles for Effectively Maintaining Professional Boundaries as a Service ProviderSolid working relationships need rapport and trust to function well. Certainly as a service provider, it’s your job to make sure your customers feel at ease with approaching you, relating to you and considering your advice.Relationship-building, however, should not come at the expense of your credibility, effectiveness, health and personal life. Successful (and ethical!) working relationships are anchored on a clear understanding of what your role is and what your role isn’t. Even if your work has personal meaning to you, you have to maintain professional boundaries.Here are some principles to consider when establishing and maintaining professional boundaries:Empower Not RescueYour role is to assist your customers in achieving their goals.  Point them in the right direction, nurture the attitude needed, give them encouragement--- but don’t do the work for them! You may feel that you’re being helpful when you do so, but you may be robbing them of the opportunity to learn and the satisfaction of accomplishment. Remember, everyone’s capable of solutions; don’t assume your customers are any different.Take Care of YourselfDo you want to know how to get on the path to job burn-out? It’s in not knowing where work ends and where personal life begins.  Even from the onset, set clear working hours and respect those hours. Don’t take work home and turn the cell phone off!  If an issue about a customer is weighing you down, debrief by talking to a co-worker or your supervisor. There’s nothing wrong with setting reasonable limitations for your customers (and for yourself!).  This doesn’t mean you’re providing bad customer service.  It’s about taking care of yourself.Service Time is Not “Me” TimeWhile the rule is not to self disclose, only do so when it substantiates a point that addresses a customer’s needs.  Don’t use your relationship as an opportunity to vent your feelings.  In fact, rule of thumb: just listen! Active listening places the proper focus on your customers’ needs. It also creates an environment of trust.  If you talk or share too much, the customer may feel like you’re more of a “friend” versus an advisor.  This will ultimately change the dynamics of your relationship as a service provider.Don’t Open Your WalletWhile this may seem obvious, it’s very easy for this to happen, especially when someone is operating on good intentions.  Discipline yourself to only use available program funds.  This includes providing change for vending machines, sharing cigarettes or even food.  Unfortunately, as much as we’d like, we can’t be everything for our customers.  If additional funding or resources are needed, utilize your partners.  Also take the time to find out what additional resources are available within your community.Don’t Shift From Service-Provider to EmployerSimilar to the previous principle, don’t ask customers to perform personal services or work for you, even if it’s for pay. This may represent a serious conflict of interest that could cost you your job.  It also limits opportunities for your customers to pursue competitive employment and may be seen as favoritism.  Moving away from what feels “safe” (e.g. working with your agency) may be difficult, but with your encouragement your customers have the confidence to explore other employment opportunities.Be ConsistentConsistency is at the core of an effective professional relationship. Always do what you say you’re going to do.  If necessary, underpromise and overdeliver! You need to be someone that your customers can count on.  Also be sure to treat each customer with the same kindness and respect --- no matter how difficult this may be.Be a Role ModelCustomers look up to you so you need to lead by example.  Never exhibit behavior that is unprofessional, such as using profanity or taking advantage of your position to influence others.  Always be on time for appointments and keep meetings concise and to the point.  Keep the best interests of the customer in mind and always remember, especially when working with youth, that you are being seen as the “expert.”  It may not seem like it at times, but you are an authority in what you do.Be AccountableWhen working in a community setting, it’s easy to get lost, emotionally and professionally, in the systems that you’re assisting. Stay in touch with an anchor who can give you feedback, perhaps a co-worker. Never keep information from your supervisors; keep them updated with successes and challenges. No one likes to be caught off guard. If you’re not certain what to do, consult with your supervisor.While setting boundaries may feel like too much work, or even feel artificial, they’re a necessary element in becoming a better service provider. Boundaries sustain your energy and develop others’. They enhance the service process in running more efficiently and effectively.  As with any relationship, if you have a clear grasp of who you are, and consequently who your customers are, the lines of communication will remain clearly understood.http://www.articlesbase.com/human-resources-articles/8-principles-for-effectively-maintaining-professional-boundaries-as-a-service-provider-1293358.htmlLisa Jordan is a disability and workforce development expert. Lisa uses her keen ability to identify challenges and develop solutions so that workforce development professionals can increase their comfort level, productivity and effectiveness when working with a diverse clientele. Download Lisa’s Special Report on 5 Easy Disability Tips to Immediately Increase Agency Accessibility by visiting http://www.human-solutions.netRead more: http://www.articlesbase.com/human-resources-articles/8-principles-for-effectively-maintaining-professional-boundaries-as-a-service-provider-1293358.html#ixzz1BdwmzzwDUnder Creative Commons License: Attribution
  • Why are boundaries important?http://www.ehow.com/facts_6003447_boundaries-important_.htmlOvercoming the disease to please: How to Recognize Collapsed, Inflexible, Unhealthy Boundaries http://www.suite101.com/content/protecting-personal-boundaries-a34799Tools for enforcing personal boundaries http://www.lifetoolsforwomen.com/p/personal-boundaries.htmWhy Are Boundaries Important?By Brooke Nichols, eHow Contributor updated: February 18, 2010 Why Are Boundaries Important?Personal boundaries are important in promoting a healthy balance in relationships, assertive communication with others and respect for self. Boundaries are beneficial in preserving the self apart from others.SignificanceEstablishing personal boundaries is beneficial in maintaining a healthy sense of self in interpersonal relationships. Healthy boundaries promote better emotional development and assertiveness skills. FunctionMaintaining boundaries functions to create invisible lines based on what a person is willing or not willing to do to protect personal values, morals and needs. FeaturesUsing "I" messages to communicate feelings, needs and wants helps to communicate personal boundaries to others. Owning feelings and communicating in a direct and honest manner minimizes chances for others to manipulate someone in a relationship. EffectsLearning to love oneself, empowerment and gaining respect from others are all the effects of setting healthy boundaries. People with healthy boundaries are less lonely, feel less guilty in relationships and are less likely to be abused by others. BenefitsSetting healthy boundaries allows for more opportunities to get what is needed, wanted and deserved in life. Recognizing the importance of boundaries increases the chance for a full and prosperous existence. Read more: Why Are Boundaries Important? | eHow.comhttp://www.ehow.com/facts_6003447_boundaries-important_.html#ixzz1DEbBN3AB

Transcript

  • 1. Part 1. What is sexual health?
    Part 2. Why have Priority Population Groups for Sexual Health Services?
    Part 3. The framework of a phone call.
    Part 4. Managing difficult calls.
    Triage Course Overview
  • 2. Part 1What is Sexual Health?
    “If the average person knew as little about eating as he does about sex, he would quickly starve to death.”
    Dr. David Reuben
  • 3. Part 1. What is sexual health?
    Learning objectives:
    At the end of this session you will be able to:
    Understand how people learn about sexand why people might have sex.
    Identify the barriers to communicating about sex.
    Define that sexual health is not merely the absence of disease.
    Define and maintain healthy personal and professional sexual health boundaries.
  • 4. Learning about sex
    People learn about sex in many different ways, such as through school education, friends and family, magazines, books, internet multi-media and/or through experience with sexual partners. As a result people have varying levels of knowledge about sex and sexually transmissible infection (STI) risks.
  • 5. Reasons people have sex
    People may have sex for different reasons – for example - pleasure, relaxation, pregnancy, money or other forms of exchange, power, commitment or love.
    Sex is generally considered a personal and a private matter and is usually not communicated about openly or explicitly.
  • 6. Some people may consider sex to mean any form of interaction occurring within a sexual context, whereas others may view sex to only refer to the process required for pregnancy to result or where insertive activity has occurred.
  • 7. Sex is also confined by norms, which are considered acceptable or not acceptable. The interpretations of this can vary between individuals and groups.
  • 8. Stigma
    Stigma is the mark of disgrace associated with a particular circumstance, quality or person.1
    Erving Goffmandefined stigma as the process by which normal identity is spoiled by the reactions of others (1963).2
    A person may be reluctant to admit to certain sexual behaviours because of the stigma associated with them.
    The Sex in Australia study (2003) reported a range of sexual behaviours which varied from the norm.3
    Reference
    1http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/stigma accessed 17 Dec 2010.
    2Goffman E., (1963) Stigma: Notes on the Management of Spoiled Identity, Prentice-Hall, 1963
    3Richters,J. Grulich, A., de Vissler R.O. Smith, A., & Rissel, C.E. Sex in Australia: Autoerotic and other
    sexual practices engaged in by a representative sample of adults. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health Vol 27, Issue 2, p 180-190, April 2003.
  • 9. For these reasons people may not be able to communicate effectively about sex for fear of being misunderstood or judged.
  • 10. Consequently people may not receive the right information, support and help. It is important to be aware of these barriers and how your own beliefs may effect communication when triaging.
  • 11. Part 1. What is Sexual Health?
    5 myths that stigmatise Sexually Transmissible Infections (STIs)
    Only people who are ‘promiscuous’ / people with ‘no morals’ get STIs
    Married people don’t have STIs
    You can get STIs from toilet seats
    You can’t get an STI through oral sex
    People usually know if they are infected
  • 12. More Myths about STIs
    4 more myths that stigmatise STIs
    Sex workers have lots of STIs
    Only gay men have HIV
    People who have an STI are ‘dirty’
    You can’t get an STI if you only have one partner
  • 13. World Health Organisation’s Definition of Sexual Health
    Sexual health is a state of physical, emotional, mental and social well-being in relation to sexuality; it is not merely the absence of disease, dysfunction or infirmity.
    Sexual health requires a positive and respectful approach to sexuality and sexual relationships, as well as the possibility of having pleasurable and safe sexual experiences, free of coercion, discrimination and violence.
    For sexual health to be attained and maintained, the sexual rights of all persons must be respected, protected and fulfilled (WHO 2002).
    WHO (2002) Defining Sexual Health Report on a technical consultation on sexual health 28-31 January 2002 Geneva
  • 14. Fundamental to this concept is the right to sexual information and the right to pleasure.
  • 15. The purpose of sexual health care should therefore be the enhancement of life and personal relationships and not merely counselling and care related to procreation or STI prevention.
  • 16. Personal and Professional Boundaries
  • 17. Personal and Professional Boundaries
    A common misconception is that when a person talks about sex, it means they may be personally interested.
    At work when you first start talking about sex (particularly with strangers), it is not unusual to feel a little anxious and unsure.
  • 18. Personal and Professional Boundaries
    In sexual health, it is not voyeuristic to ask certain questions as long as there is a clear professional reason for asking them. There is a clear distinction between personal and professional boundaries.
    For your professional development, it is helpful to be aware of your personal boundaries and how they may impact on your professional life.
  • 19. Personal and Professional Boundaries
    Please take a moment to read:
    Principles for Effectively Maintaining Professional Boundaries as a Service Provider
    Why Are Boundaries Important?
  • 20. Reflective Exercise
    Exercise 1
    • Reflect on your knowledge and understanding of sex.
    • 21. How did you learn about sex?
    • 22. Who can you talk to about sex and who wouldn’t you talk to?
    • 23. What makes it difficult to talk about sex?
    • 24. Where would you go to for information and help?
  • Online Resources on Personal Boundaries
    Why are boundaries important?
    Overcoming the disease to please: How to Recognize Collapsed, Inflexible, Unhealthy Boundaries
    Tools for enforcing personal boundaries
  • 25. Please click here to test your knowledge