Linked Location Data as a Service
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Linked Location Data as a Service

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Presentation based on position paper submitted for ...

Presentation based on position paper submitted for
Joint W3C/OGC workshop: Linking Geospatial Data
5th - 6th March 2014, Campus London, Shoreditch
http://www.w3.org/2014/03/lgd/agenda#al58

Geographic information is provided in heterogeneous formats, creating technical and semantic barriers that hinder data consumers to combine data from various sources. Linked Data design principles can help alleviate these barriers and realise three generic use cases for data consumers to consume location data as linked data. We have demonstrated the technical feasibility for this in a Linked Data pilot that integrates address data from five different public sector organisations in Belgium. The pilot demonstrates that a Linked Data layer can be built on top of an existing geospatial implementation with a minimum of effort. It also shows that URI sets for INSPIRE spatial objects and spatial things can accommodate both XML (GML) and RDF representations.

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  • Presentation based on position paper submitted for Joint W3C/OGC workshop: Linking Geospatial Data5th - 6th March 2014, Campus London, Shoreditchhttp://www.w3.org/2014/03/lgd/agenda#al58
  • European publicadministrationsmaintain base registerswithauthentic location data. Examples of such base registers are the British National Street Gazetteer [NSG], the Dutch Building and Addressregister [BAG], or the Flemish Central Reference Database for Addresses [CRAB]. According to the EuropeanInteroperability Framework [EIF], base registers are the cornerstone of public services. The EIF recommends public administrations to develop interfaces to authentic sources and alignthem at semantic and technicallevel.To date, the public sector has not yet tapped into the full potential of its base address registers. In Belgium, for example, the use of address data is impeded by the following obstacles: Address data fragmentation. The address data at Belgian federal level and at the three regions is housed in isolated registries maintained by the National civil register, AGIV, CIRB, and SPW.Heterogeneous address data formats. Address data is provided using different specifications. Lack of common identifiers. Addresses, administrative units, roads, buildings, and cadastral parcels are not identified by well-formed identifiers thus making it hard to reconcile data about the same entity coming from different sources. This situation is depicted in Figure 1. Due to these obstacles, consumers of address data such as national, regional, and local public administrations, businesses, and citizens make limited use of the aforementioned registers. Address data is duplicated and therefore fragmented in many different registers.
  • The Core Location Vocabulary is a simplified, reusable and extensible data model that captures the fundamental characteristics of a location, represented as an address, a geographic name, or a geometry [Location]. It is specified as a UML Static Model, an RDF Schema, and an XML Schema.The vocabulary has been developed in the period December 2011 – May 2012 by a multi disciplinary Working Group, with a total of 69 people from 22 countries, 18 EU and 4 non-EU countries (USA, South-Africa, Norway and Croatia), and several EU Institutions. The Working Group was co-chaired by Paul Smits, AdreaPerego, and Michael Lutz of the European Commission INSPIRE team. On 23 May 2012, the Coordination Group of the ISA Programme has endorsed version 1.00 of the combined specification of the Core Business, Core Location and Core Person Vocabulary [Business, Location, Person]. Although endorsement does not make the specifications legally binding, it is an important milestone as the EU Member States acknowledge the work and commit to further exploit and disseminate it at national level. The W3C Location and Addresses Community Group [locadd] is to review the existing efforts such as the Core Location Vocabulary in and assess whether any use cases would be served by harmonization and/or new standardization work. It may produce specifications or use cases and requirements documents, which may be proposed for adoption by the W3C Government Linked Data (GLD) Working Group.2012-05-30, ISA Member State representatives endorse key specifications for e-Government interoperabilityhttp://joinup.ec.europa.eu/news/isa-member-state-representatives-endorse-key-specifications-e-government-interoperability
  • In the period November 2012 – February 2013, we have carried out a pilot to demonstrate that the Core Location Vocabulary and related INSPIRE data specifications on addresses can be applied to aggregate address data from various sources and contribute to overcoming the aforementioned obstacles. In particular, the pilot entails the following steps: Develop (provisional) URI sets enabling Belgian addresses to be uniquely identified and looked up on the Web by well-formed HTTP URIs;Represent existing address data from the federal and regional road and address registers using the Core Location vocabulary and experimental INSPIRE RDF vocabularies;Put in place a linked data infrastructure that allows querying harmonised Belgian addresses from a SPARQL endpoint (see Figure 3).Demonstrate the value of the linked data infrastructure to disambiguate, lookup, and link address data using simple Web-based standards such as HTTP, XML, and RDF.
  • The use of Linked Data design principles enables the following generic use cases for data consumers, which are illustrated in Figure 1 for address data:Use Case 1: Disambiguate a location by attributing an identifier (a URI) to it. A consumer queries a spatial data service to determine which location object identifier(s) (URIs) corresponds to a particular notation. Use Case 2:Look up (de-reference or resolve) a location object identifier in different formats. A user looks-up further information about a spatial object by resolving its HTTP URI. The system returns machine-readable information about the address in the format requested (e.g. GML, RDF-XML, JSON-LD notation)..Use Case 3:Link data sets via unique addressidentifiers. This use case is a consequence of usingcommonaddressidentifiers (preferably HTTP URIs) to denoteaddresses.

Linked Location Data as a Service Linked Location Data as a Service Presentation Transcript

  • Linked Location Data as a Service Linking Geospatial Data 5th - 6th March 2014, Google Campus London, Shoreditch Stijn Goedertier – PwC EU Services Nikolaos Loutas – PwC EU Services Vassilios Peristeras – European Commission 5 March 2014 ISA Programme, Action 1.1 Presentation based on position paper submitted for Joint W3C/OGC workshop: Linking Geospatial Data 5th - 6th March 2014, Campus London, Shoreditch http://www.w3.org/2014/03/lgd/agenda#al58
  • DATA CONSUMER Lack of common identifiers Unlinked Low quality Non-interoperable UrBIS - Brussels Capital Region AGIV - Flanders Heterogeneous data formats ? Data fragmentation PICC - Wallonia NGI – National Geographic Institute Civil register 2
  • Core Location Vocabulary • A simplified, reusable and extensible data model that captures the fundamental characteristics of a location, represented as an address, a geographic name, or a geometry. • Developed in the period December 2011 – May 2012 by a multi disciplinary Working Group 3
  • Core Location Task Force • co-chairs: Michael Lutz, Paul Smits, Andrea Perego (DG JRC) • editor: Phil Archer (W3C) • task force: Segun Alayande, Adam Arndt, Joseph Azzopardi, Chirsina Bapst, Serena Coetzee, Andreas Gehlert, Giorgios Georgiannakis, Anja Hopfstock, Andreas • Illert, Michaela Elisa Jackson, Morten Lind, Matthias Lüttgert, Andras Micsik, Piotr Piotrowski, Greg Potterton, Peter Schmitz, Raj Singh, Athina Trakas, Rob Walker, Stuart Williams, Peter Winstanley, ... 4
  • 3 representation formats Conceptual model Re-use existing concepts in CCL, INSPIRE, etc. RDF schema Re-uses existing Linked Data vocabularies XML schema Re-uses Core Components Technical Specification (CCTS). ISA Open Metadata Licence v1.1 Maintained by W3C (W3C Location and Address Community) 5
  • W3C Location and Address Community • The W3C Location and Addresses Community Group is to review the existing efforts such as the Core Location Vocabulary and assess whether any use cases would be served by harmonization and/or new standardization work. • It may produce specifications or use cases and requirements documents, which may be proposed for adoption by the W3C Government Linked Data (GLD) Working Group 6
  • DATA CONSUMER lookup, disambiguate, link Xquery, Xpath • SPARQL endpoint Linked address data Common Data models INSPIRE XML view RDF view XML and RDF views on relational data served over a Web interface LOGD INFRASTRUCTURE sample address data in native format UrBIS - Brussels Capital Region CRAB - Flanders PICC - Wallonia NGI – National Geographic Institute Civil register 7 Core Location Pilot: https://joinup.ec.europa.eu/node/63242
  • Combining XML, RDF, and Linked Data XML Client RDF Client Web Browser HTTP Web Application Server XML Processor SPARQL engine SQL Processor RDF Quad Store relational database external database OpenLink Virtuso 8
  • Three use cases for data consumers UC3: Link datasets by means of address identifiers UC2: Look up (de- Address Identifier Example: http://location.testproject .eu/so/ad/AddressReprese ntation/SPW/248565 reference) an address identifier UC1: Disambiguate (reconcile) an address notation Address Notation Example: Chaussée de Bruxelles 135 1310 La Hulpe 9
  • UC1: Disambiguate (query) address notations • SPARQL query on the triple store • The query is converted into SQL and hits the relational tables of several data providers
  • UC2: Resolve Web identifiers 11
  • UC3: Link address data 12
  • UC3: Link address data 13
  • Conclusions • Core Location ánd INSPIRE AD can be used to harmonise address data from disparate systems • Core Location can be easily extended with (still experimental) INSPIRE RDF vocabularies • URI sets for INSPIRE spatial objects and spatial things can accommodate both the XML (GML) and RDF world 14
  • SEMIC 2014 – Athens, 9 April http://semic.eu 15
  • ISA Programme Action 1.1 – Semantic Interoperability Project Officer Contractors Vassilios.Peristeras@ec.europa.eu Stijn.Goedertier@be.pwc.com Nikolaos.Loutas@be.pwc.com Visit our initiatives ADM S. SW CORE Get involved Follow @SEMICeu on Twitter Join SEMIC group on LinkedIn PUBLIC SERVICE VOCABULARY Join SEMIC community on Joinup