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Implementing e-inclusion in Flanders

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Presentation for IAMCR 2010.

Presentation for IAMCR 2010.

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  • 1. 1 Implementing e-inclusion in Flanders: going beyond access? A critical analysis of e-inclusion initiatives and their ability to improve multiple digital literacies Ilse Mariën Chris Vleugels Stijn Bannier Leo Van Audenhove
  • 2. 2 Research Framework  Desk research on evolution digital divide   Skills & usage   Social networks   Lifestyle and life stages    Do government and civil society undertake actions in line with current complexities and changes of today’s digital divide?  Inventory of existing e-inclusion initiatives in Flanders   Modus operandi   Pedagogical approach   Embedding  Brainstorm with stakeholders   Gain insight in digital divide second degree   Develop policy recommendations to improve e- inclusion
  • 3. 3 Increased complexity of digital exclusion   More than   Access   Dichotomous conceptualizations   Socio-demographic characteristics   Reconsideration of traditional barriers   Material & mental access   Usage  context of use   Skills  digital literacies   Other important indicators   Cognitive skills – Knowledge gap – Learning divide   Resources - Social / economic / cultural capital   Added value / meaning of ICT   Content & quality of access & usage    digital exclusion beyond disadvantaged groups
  • 4. 4 Modus Operandi  No top-down policy  Emergence of wide range of bottom-up initiatives   Most provide access + training  14% only access   87% Computer + Internet training   Computer only  elderly people   52% fixed location   89% free access to computer spaces   41% free access to training   87% open to all public – 60% additional effort to reach disadvantaged groups
  • 5. 5 Modus Operandi  Usage opportunities  Computer – nearly free choice  Games in 83% of cases  Internet – more restricted  Download forbidden in 50% of cases  Focus training  Very divers  Computer – mostly operational issues + Word  Internet – mostly Google  Less – practical issues: SW & HW installation, updates, burn CDs, …
  • 6. 6 Pedagogical approach   75% demand & offer driven   57% focus on follow-up training   64% proper learning material – mostly custom made   Coaching in more than 90%   Ca. 15% volunteers without additional training   Ca. 30% volunteers with additional training   Computer spaces : 20% professional teachers   Library staff, education workers, …   Extensive focus on operational & formal skills   Less on strategic skills   Risks & opportunities of internet   Privacy online in 63%   Spam in 40%   Sexually tainted material / illegal content in 41%
  • 7. 7 Embedding in social structures   Extensive collaboration   49% has 1-3 partners   29% more than 10 partners   Provided support   Hardware – 39%   Financial – 35% - local & regional government   Infrastructure – 37%   Efforts to reach disadvantaged groups – 34%   Trainer-trainer support – 15%   Learning materials – 19%   Only 9% not reliant on external funding
  • 8. Positive aspects  Personalized coaching  Demand driven approach  Small groups – low pace – custom made learning material  Increases motivation  Enhances take up of use + further training  Overcomes traditional learning barriers  Lack of confidence  Low self-esteem  Reluctance towards formal education 8
  • 9. Positive aspects  Embedding in existing structures  Overcomes social network barriers  Problems of lack of confidence  Limited social networks  Low self-esteem  Lack of ICT-knowledge in personal social network  Requires extensive collaboration at local level 9
  • 10. Conclusion  Flemish organizations developed a well- suited approach to digital inclusion   Starting from existing social networks   Specific pedagogical approach   By which disadvantaged groups are reached  Strategic use of ICT???  However, problems & bottlenecks exist   Coaching   Technical issues   Custom made approach   Financing 10
  • 11. 11 Contact   Ilse Mariën   IBBT SMIT Vrije Universiteit Brussel   VUB – Department Communication Sciences   Pleinlaan 9, 1050 Brussels   Phd Digital divide – Digital literacy   www.ilsemarien.com   Ilse.marien@vub.ac.be   +32 496 28.24.88   Leo Van Audenhove   Leo.van.audenhove@vub.ac.be   +32 2 629.24.15

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