School’s Out! SummerLearning Collaboration Is In
NSLA seeks to:• Improve the quality of summer learning opportunities• Expand access to summer learning• Increase demand fo...
Why Summer MattersThe Faucet Theory
Afterschool and SummerFaucet Theory: learningresources are turned on forall youth during the schoolyear because of equalac...
Afterschool and Summer During the summer, the faucet is turned OFFfor low-income youth. A limited flow of resources in t...
The Effects of Summer Learning Loss Since 1906, numerous studies have confirmed thatchildren experience learning losses i...
Up to 2/3 of the ninth grade readingachievement gap can be attributed tosummer learning loss in the elementaryyears alone.
AchievementorOpportunity?
“Virtually all of the advantage thatwealthy students have over poorstudents is the result of differences inthe way privile...
“It may seem counterintuitive, but schools don’tseem to produce much of the disparity in testscores between high- and low-...
What is the opportunity gap? Over the last 40 years, upper-income parentshave increased the amount they spend ontheir kid...
3,5365,6506,9758,8728351,264 1,173 1,31502,5005,0007,50010,0001972 to 1973 1983 to 1984 1994 to 1995 2005 to 2006Enrichmen...
Summer Learning is a viablesolution to level theplaying field.
SchoolYearSummerSummer Learning and K-12Education
SchoolYearSummerSummer Learning and K-12Education
SchoolYearSummerSummer Learning and K-12Education
Tipping Point What would it take to change the trajectory ofschools through summer learning? 30% of kids and teachers?
What can WE do, together?
Who are summer learningstakeholders?
Children and Youth Build their academic skills Build their confidence Expose them to their future Inspire them to lead...
Educators
Parents• 76 percent of parents feel more involved in theirchild’s education as a result of the summerprogram.• 82 percent ...
Summer Learning Loss – Real, Not Urgent Parents view summer learning loss as real Many parents reported seeing it happen...
Summer Learning Loss – Intervention Needed? Many parents believe that they can prevent or ameliorate the effectsof summer...
Schools and CBOs Schools are on the hook for achievement• Hold the data that can drive programming CBOs have capacity fo...
Funders and Policymakers Need evidence to make the case!• Youth outcomes• Economic and social costs and benefits Need to...
Re-teaching costs weeks of theschool year Up to 6 weeks spent re-teaching the previousyear’s skills each fall $1,667/$10...
Higher Ed and Business College and career ready students Workforce pipeline
Summer Learning CommunityReport Card
Our Challenge Set clear goals that direct and motivatecommunities. Provide guidance for action that is based onwhat work...
Moving the Needle in SummerCoordinated civic action can lead to:• Increased awareness and action• Better understanding of ...
Long-term Impact Increase the number of youth thatdemonstrate improved outcomes• What are the specific youth outcomes the...
Intermediate Outcomes(Progress Indicators) Program level progress• More programs tracking targeted specific youthoutcomes...
Intermediate Outcomes(Progress Indicators) Community level progress• Increased partnerships• More capacity in existing pr...
System Indicators1. Shared Vision and Citywide Coordination2. Engaged Leadership3. Data Management System4. Quality Improv...
What’s possiblein the summer?
BostonBoston Summer Learning Project
“Unfortunately, in the search to find the “silver bullet” forAmerican education, afterschool and summer learning are often...
Boston Summer Learning Project Mayor Thomas Menino’s challenge to thecommunity Boston Opportunity Agenda – educationpipe...
Boston Summer Learning Project 2012 – 1,500 youth, 40 schools and 17community partner organizations Boston Public School...
Boston “ACT” Framework42
Boston Summer Learning Project
Boston Summer Learning Project
System Indicators1. Shared Vision and Citywide Coordination2. Engaged Leadership3. Data Management System4. Quality Improv...
Baltimore CitySuper Summers
Baltimore City Super Summers Led by the Mayor’s office based on prioritiesset by the Mayor’s Youth Cabinet Partnership b...
 Coordinated marketing, communications andoutreach strategy Central information portals – website and 211 Community can...
California Summer MealsCoalitionFeeding and Reading
Connecting Summer Meals & Reading Partnership between California Summer MealCoalition and California Library Association...
Connecting Summer Meals & ReadingGoals: To increase access to summer meals by increasing thenumber of summer meal sponsor...
Summer Matters CampaignCalifornia
Summer Matters Campaign Steering Committee of state and nationalorganizations Legislative Task Force• Set aside of 21st ...
54Successful collaborationsSource: White House Council for CommunitySolutions, Community Collaboratives Whitepaper, 2011
Successful collaborations55Source: White House Council for CommunitySolutions, Community Collaboratives Whitepaper, 2011
Collaboratives with:• Aspiration to needle-moving (e.g.10%+) change on a community-wide metric• Long-term investment in su...
NSLA Events and Resources New Vision for Summer School Network Funding Roadmap publication Summer Learning Day, June 21...
AdvancingOutcomes forYouth:Demonstratingyour value in adata-driven ageRegister now atsummerlearning.org
THANK YOU!www.summerlearning.org
Maa summer summit speech 2
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  • You are all afterschool experts. There are many similiarities between quality in afterschool programs and quality in summer programs, but I want to frame for you some differences that really cause a shift in thinking and planning for summer programs.
  • No additional learning, readingNo meal programsNo exercise
  • 5 minHere’s another way to look at this.As you can see from this slide, the distance between middle income and low income students with no summer school grows wider throughout their elementary school years. Why does this happen? The rate of learning in school year is the same—SUMMER is where the slide back occurs. By the end of fifth grade, low-income children are approximately 2 ½ years behind their more affluent peers, primarily because of summer learning loss. Activity: Physical Demonstration This physical demonstration shows reading achievement of low income and middle income students who did not participate in a summer learning program. Choose two volunteers; assign one to represent a child from a middle income home (MI) and a child from a low income home (LI). Explain that the volunteers must walk "heel to toe" during the demonstration.Summer before KindergartenMI, LI stand side by sideLI take one step back? Why does the lower income student start out behind?Lack of books, exposureLack of exposure to different places and experiencesLittle interaction with other youth or caring adultsKindergarten yearMI, LI take 8 steps forwardSummerMI=1/2 step forwardLI=2 steps back
  • Examining Consumer Expenditure Surveys fromthe U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, Greg Duncan of the UCIrvine, and Richard Murnane, of Harvard, calculated that in inflation-adjusted dollars, the most affluent parents’ spending on enrichment activities for their children grew about two and a half times from 1972-73 to 2005/06,compared to an increase of only 57% for the least well-off parents, widening what was already a substantial gap.This data includes spending on private schools, which may go beyond what many consider enrichment. Nonetheless, the overall trend is clear. The opportunity gap as measured by spending on enrichment is growing rapidly.
  • We identified 6 key system indicators that encompass specific strategies and activities that will help move communities towards success. These strategies are not novel, they are rooted in practices that have been tested in communities and demonstrate effectiveness in out-of-school time system building, and have the ability to help move communities toward population-level change.The indicators and corresponding tools will provide a frame for communities to identify and implement the specific activities that make sense using their existing resources and help to address their needs. Our framework provides examples of how the specific activities within each strategy may vary based on a communities level of readiness, categorized as Basic, Emerging and Exemplary. Provide quick overview of what each Indicator includes and leading community examples. Shared Vision and Citywide CoordinationSteering community of summer stakeholders from across sectorsA community plan for summer that includes common goals and metrics, shared accountability for action and defined strategies and activities that relate to the core system indicatorsIntermediary(s) that lead work related to data, quality and resource developmentEngaged Leadership District, city, lead CBO and philanthropic leaders involved in development and implementation of community planLeaders set priorities that lead to supportive funding and policiesData Management SystemBaseline community data that connects to progress indicators (ie – population of students that need support; #s of opportunities, slots, partnerships; geography of opportunities; demand for programs; funding; quality and outcomes)Developing system for data collection, sharing using data to understand impact and drive planning Standardizing data collection across providers to understand access, quality and effectivenessQuality Improvement SystemUtilizing quality standards to drive program assessment, planning and improvementDeveloping a system for training and professional development to programs and families that is connected to research based best practices, quality indicators and community outcomes goalsSustainable ResourcesDevelopment of a community funding plan that includes multi-year targets for braiding existing resources and increasing overall resources to meet goals for quality and scaleResources support programming and community level system (ie collaborative planning, marketing and outreach, programs training & assessment, data collection and analysis)Marketing and Communications StrategyDevelopment of a strategies to build awareness and drive participation Strategies connect outreach efforts of different providers Community leaders, summer stakeholders and parents support advocacy and communication activities
  • Funding Case Study Framework Name of district / community: City of Boston Year and name of program described: 2012, Boston Summer Learning Project Total cost of program described: $3,037,231  Breakdown by major funding streams with amounts:Boston Opportunity Agenda - 1,241,146 (41% of total)Boston Public Schools - $501,085 (16% of total)Title I allocation for just the BSLP - $460,875 Federal Meals Program - $40,210 National foundations - $1,030,000 (34% of total)Wallace Foundation - 580,000 NSLA Smarter Summers (BELL) - 450,000 Other private - 265,000 (9% of total, BELL estimate) NVSS program description:The Boston Summer Learning Project (BSLP) aims to increase summer learning access and meet the needs of previously under-served youth within Boston’s Circle of Promise, an area of the city with the highest concentrations of poverty. Launched by Mayor Menino and the Boston Opportunity Agenda in 2010, BSLP is a key initiative of the Opportunity Agenda’s education pipeline collaboration, helping students meet key education benchmarks, stay on track for graduation, and prepare to succeed in college and beyond.  BSLP programs are rigorous enough to qualify for academic credit and engaging enough to attract students voluntarily.  Principals select the student’s they know most need this opportunity, based on not only their academic performance but also their social-emotional needs.  Community partners raise their game, working side by side with teachers to create an active, engaging learning experience that helps students link what they learn in the classroom to the world around them. Co-managed by Boston Public Schools (BPS) and Boston Afterschool & Beyond (BASB), a citywide intermediary focused on expanding learning opportunities for the city’s young people, BSLP served 1,585 students from 40 schools in 2012. Recognizing that summer affords the opportunity to help students learn and apply knowledge and skills in different ways, schools worked in partnership with 17 community-based organizations. Although individual partnership approaches vary based on the needs of the students and the particular natural or cultural resources available, sites provide full-day, five-week long integrated learning experiences totaling an average of 170 hours of programming. In a district that manages a portfolio of summer options that serves 11,000 students, up from 6,000 two years ago, BSLP serves as a laboratory for innovation and learning. The model is testing how deeper, more strategic, and more measurable community partnerships can benefit student during the summer months and strengthen schools’ partnership approaches year-round. School and community educators join forces, leveraging content expertise, more time, new learning environments, and skill-building approaches that personalize learning experience.  How was the issue prioritized?Boston’s approach to summer learning prioritizes closing the opportunity gap as a way to address the achievement gap. With the summer of 2010 on the horizon, Boston’s Mayor Thomas M. Menino was determined to see as many students as possible from the Circle of Promise connected to summer learning opportunities. Despite Boston’s rich and diverse array of programs, the Mayor was concerned that the kids who could benefit most were not finding their way to programs.  Meanwhile, the Boston Opportunity Agenda worked with Boston After School & Beyond to convene school district officials, summer program providers, and funders to develop a mutually understood framework for a collaboration. This collaboration would tackle summer learning loss by leverage community partnerships to provide students new opportunities learn and grow. They would focus on students from the lowest performing schools who did not have summer learning plans in place by May and June. The initial investment, recognizing that the selected students were not part of existing district or community programs, would subsidize program costs at $1,500 per student.  A common challenge in citywide initiatives is determining what age group to prioritize within education strategies. “Summer allows us to address all ages. By putting the unmet needs of youth at the forefront, it became clear that we were addressing an issue that no organization could address alone.” Chris Smith, Executive Director of Boston After School & Beyond.  Three key steps to creating a citywide model :Identify a specific target population to get started. BSLP focused on turnaround schools in the Circle of Promise.Coordinate local and national initiatives to maximize investments and partnerships under a unified strategy. Develop common goals and measures that track both systems-development and youth outcomes and inform improvement.  Key lessons learned/challengesin funding citywide models: Private and public funding sources often have specific requirements related to program activities and youth served. Coordinating resources around central goals and measures allows schools and partners the flexibility to innovate based on their particular set of resources. Early planning pays off. Evaluation and funding timelines should align with planning benchmarks. Engaging funding partners and stakeholders in year-round planning can influence earlier funding processes and decisions.  Partnerships: Community-based partners are selected through a rigorous application process and must demonstrate capacity to serve students identified by schools, collaborate with teachers, offer five weeks of full-time programming, and create a learning environment that reinforces academics, builds skills, and strengthens students’ relationships with peers and adults. There is no one size fits all approach – each program is built around the needs and interests of the specific group of students it serves. The system is guided by a common set of goals and indicators, but programs have the freedom they need to innovate, harnessing their own particular area of expertise to capture their students’ imaginations.   Preliminary outcomes: The project has led to notable system change, including adjustments to Boston Public Schools assessments to give the city a comprehensive measure of summer learning multiple grade levels. BSLP efforts have created a shared understanding among stakeholders of the importance of summer learning, and the huge potential summer offers to build on the school year and close the opportunity gap. Providers and educators throughout the city now talk about one set of measures, and use a common language when thinking about the skills that support success not only in school, but throughout post-secondary options and beyond. Schools and community organizations are seeking ways to bring the innovative active learning seen during the summer into the school, forging partnerships to expand learning opportunities throughout the school day and year.   This is 2011 budget. Chris Smith is working to get 2012 numbers from BSP. Could we footnote budget as 2011 if needed? Or “three key steps to funding a citywide model”. Thoughts?
  • Funding Case Study Framework Name of district / community: City of Boston Year and name of program described: 2012, Boston Summer Learning Project Total cost of program described: $3,037,231  Breakdown by major funding streams with amounts:Boston Opportunity Agenda - 1,241,146 (41% of total)Boston Public Schools - $501,085 (16% of total)Title I allocation for just the BSLP - $460,875 Federal Meals Program - $40,210 National foundations - $1,030,000 (34% of total)Wallace Foundation - 580,000 NSLA Smarter Summers (BELL) - 450,000 Other private - 265,000 (9% of total, BELL estimate) NVSS program description:The Boston Summer Learning Project (BSLP) aims to increase summer learning access and meet the needs of previously under-served youth within Boston’s Circle of Promise, an area of the city with the highest concentrations of poverty. Launched by Mayor Menino and the Boston Opportunity Agenda in 2010, BSLP is a key initiative of the Opportunity Agenda’s education pipeline collaboration, helping students meet key education benchmarks, stay on track for graduation, and prepare to succeed in college and beyond.  BSLP programs are rigorous enough to qualify for academic credit and engaging enough to attract students voluntarily.  Principals select the student’s they know most need this opportunity, based on not only their academic performance but also their social-emotional needs.  Community partners raise their game, working side by side with teachers to create an active, engaging learning experience that helps students link what they learn in the classroom to the world around them. Co-managed by Boston Public Schools (BPS) and Boston Afterschool & Beyond (BASB), a citywide intermediary focused on expanding learning opportunities for the city’s young people, BSLP served 1,585 students from 40 schools in 2012. Recognizing that summer affords the opportunity to help students learn and apply knowledge and skills in different ways, schools worked in partnership with 17 community-based organizations. Although individual partnership approaches vary based on the needs of the students and the particular natural or cultural resources available, sites provide full-day, five-week long integrated learning experiences totaling an average of 170 hours of programming. In a district that manages a portfolio of summer options that serves 11,000 students, up from 6,000 two years ago, BSLP serves as a laboratory for innovation and learning. The model is testing how deeper, more strategic, and more measurable community partnerships can benefit student during the summer months and strengthen schools’ partnership approaches year-round. School and community educators join forces, leveraging content expertise, more time, new learning environments, and skill-building approaches that personalize learning experience.  How was the issue prioritized?Boston’s approach to summer learning prioritizes closing the opportunity gap as a way to address the achievement gap. With the summer of 2010 on the horizon, Boston’s Mayor Thomas M. Menino was determined to see as many students as possible from the Circle of Promise connected to summer learning opportunities. Despite Boston’s rich and diverse array of programs, the Mayor was concerned that the kids who could benefit most were not finding their way to programs.  Meanwhile, the Boston Opportunity Agenda worked with Boston After School & Beyond to convene school district officials, summer program providers, and funders to develop a mutually understood framework for a collaboration. This collaboration would tackle summer learning loss by leverage community partnerships to provide students new opportunities learn and grow. They would focus on students from the lowest performing schools who did not have summer learning plans in place by May and June. The initial investment, recognizing that the selected students were not part of existing district or community programs, would subsidize program costs at $1,500 per student.  A common challenge in citywide initiatives is determining what age group to prioritize within education strategies. “Summer allows us to address all ages. By putting the unmet needs of youth at the forefront, it became clear that we were addressing an issue that no organization could address alone.” Chris Smith, Executive Director of Boston After School & Beyond.  Three key steps to creating a citywide model :Identify a specific target population to get started. BSLP focused on turnaround schools in the Circle of Promise.Coordinate local and national initiatives to maximize investments and partnerships under a unified strategy. Develop common goals and measures that track both systems-development and youth outcomes and inform improvement.  Key lessons learned/challengesin funding citywide models: Private and public funding sources often have specific requirements related to program activities and youth served. Coordinating resources around central goals and measures allows schools and partners the flexibility to innovate based on their particular set of resources. Early planning pays off. Evaluation and funding timelines should align with planning benchmarks. Engaging funding partners and stakeholders in year-round planning can influence earlier funding processes and decisions.  Partnerships: Community-based partners are selected through a rigorous application process and must demonstrate capacity to serve students identified by schools, collaborate with teachers, offer five weeks of full-time programming, and create a learning environment that reinforces academics, builds skills, and strengthens students’ relationships with peers and adults. There is no one size fits all approach – each program is built around the needs and interests of the specific group of students it serves. The system is guided by a common set of goals and indicators, but programs have the freedom they need to innovate, harnessing their own particular area of expertise to capture their students’ imaginations.   Preliminary outcomes: The project has led to notable system change, including adjustments to Boston Public Schools assessments to give the city a comprehensive measure of summer learning multiple grade levels. BSLP efforts have created a shared understanding among stakeholders of the importance of summer learning, and the huge potential summer offers to build on the school year and close the opportunity gap. Providers and educators throughout the city now talk about one set of measures, and use a common language when thinking about the skills that support success not only in school, but throughout post-secondary options and beyond. Schools and community organizations are seeking ways to bring the innovative active learning seen during the summer into the school, forging partnerships to expand learning opportunities throughout the school day and year.   This is 2011 budget. Chris Smith is working to get 2012 numbers from BSP. Could we footnote budget as 2011 if needed? Or “three key steps to funding a citywide model”. Thoughts?
  • A key reason for our confidence in Boston is that the demonstration project is part of a larger city initiative – the Boston Summer Learning Project.The project is led by the Boston Public Schools, the Boston Opportunity Agenda which recognizes summer learning as a crucial part of its cradle-to-college strategy, and Boston After School & Beyond, and includes programming from 17 community-based organizations.Wallace’s work with this citywide effort has been a two-way street.By uniting the city’s disparate summer learning programs around common goals and common metrics, the Boston Summer Learning Project has paved the way for the demonstration now in progress. At the same time, RAND’s assessments have already yielded useful lessons on implementation that have strengthened programs across the city including those not formally part of the demonstration.
  • This effort would not be possible without the vision, resources and expertise of the funding partners.The combination of government, a strong intermediary, community-based-organizations, foundations and membership organizations, makes for quite a team.
  • We identified 6 key system indicators that encompass specific strategies and activities that will help move communities towards success. These strategies are not novel, they are rooted in practices that have been tested in communities and demonstrate effectiveness in out-of-school time system building, and have the ability to help move communities toward population-level change.The indicators and corresponding tools will provide a frame for communities to identify and implement the specific activities that make sense using their existing resources and help to address their needs. Our framework provides examples of how the specific activities within each strategy may vary based on a communities level of readiness, categorized as Basic, Emerging and Exemplary. Provide quick overview of what each Indicator includes and leading community examples. Shared Vision and Citywide CoordinationSteering community of summer stakeholders from across sectorsA community plan for summer that includes common goals and metrics, shared accountability for action and defined strategies and activities that relate to the core system indicatorsIntermediary(s) that lead work related to data, quality and resource developmentEngaged Leadership District, city, lead CBO and philanthropic leaders involved in development and implementation of community planLeaders set priorities that lead to supportive funding and policiesData Management SystemBaseline community data that connects to progress indicators (ie – population of students that need support; #s of opportunities, slots, partnerships; geography of opportunities; demand for programs; funding; quality and outcomes)Developing system for data collection, sharing using data to understand impact and drive planning Standardizing data collection across providers to understand access, quality and effectivenessQuality Improvement SystemUtilizing quality standards to drive program assessment, planning and improvementDeveloping a system for training and professional development to programs and families that is connected to research based best practices, quality indicators and community outcomes goalsSustainable ResourcesDevelopment of a community funding plan that includes multi-year targets for braiding existing resources and increasing overall resources to meet goals for quality and scaleResources support programming and community level system (ie collaborative planning, marketing and outreach, programs training & assessment, data collection and analysis)Marketing and Communications StrategyDevelopment of a strategies to build awareness and drive participation Strategies connect outreach efforts of different providers Community leaders, summer stakeholders and parents support advocacy and communication activities
  • Name of district: Baltimore City Public SchoolsYear (EITHER 2011 OR 2012) and name of program described: 2012 Summer JumpTotal cost of program described: $6,550,000Breakdown by major funding streams:General Funds - $5,100,000i3 - $1,000,000Local Foundations - $450,000 NVSS program description: In 2012, Baltimore City Public Schools (BCPS) engaged more than 9500 students in Summer Jump – seven summer learning programs ranging from literacy and STEM enrichment for elementary and middle school students to credit recovery and accelerated learning courses for middle and high school students. Each program varied slightly, some programs ran for two-weeks while others ran for six-weeks. Nearly 3,000 elementary and middle school students participated in project-based STEM learning focused on investigation and problem-solving. An additional 3,000 rising 1st through 4th graders that were identified as behind in reading as measured by spring assessments participated in reading academies. World Language Camps provided middle school students with language and culture-rich experiences in Spanish, Chinese, Arabic and French.  How was the issue prioritized? Summer learning has long been a priority of Baltimore City Public Schools CEO, Andres Alonzo, and former Executive Director of Teaching and Learning, Linda Eberhart. In the fall of 2009 the summer school office moved departments, from Student Support Services to the Office of Teaching and Learning. Staff discussed a new vision for summer school and agreed that summer should be prioritized as an extension of the school year. Each summer the goal is simple - “to keep kids engaged, learning, and having fun. Cutting summer programming is never an option.” - Crystal Fleming, BCPS Coordinator of Extended Learning. To ensure the goal is met, each year BCPS designates millions of dollars in district general funds to support summer.   Partnerships: 2012 marked the initiation of a landmark collaboration in Baltimore City, led by the Mayor’s Office, between city agencies, nonprofit partners and the private sector to improve and increase the range of programs and services available to young people during the summer. Through cross-sector partnership, the district launched the elementary school reading academies – Read to Succeed Plus! (R2SP). The model included afternoon enrichment provided by a local nonprofit, the Parks and People Foundation, and other community-based partners that complemented morning literacy instruction provided by the BCPS. Parents reported that the top reason they chose to enroll their children in R2SP was because the program was a full-day. Program staff attributed high attendance rates to the blend of academics and enrichment and weekly pool trips that were possible through free pool passes provided by the City of Baltimore Recreation and Parks Department.
  • The California Summer Meal Coalition collaboration with the California Library Association Project Director(s)Patrice Chamberlain The California Summer Meal Coalition (Coalition) will collaborate with the California Library Association to explore how libraries can integrate USDA summer nutrition programs to support and enhance summer literacy programs serving low-income families. The Coalition will facilitate, support, and evaluate partnerships between summer meal providers, public libraries, and volunteer groupsCalifornia Meals Coalition is a statewide network united to combat hunger and obesity by helping California’s children in need gain access to free and healthy meals through the USDA’s summer nutrition programs. Goals:To increase access to summer meals by increasing the number of summer meal sponsors and meal sites in California. To build support for summer meal programs by engaging leaders and facilitating stronger community partnerships to create a summer “safety net.” To bridge anti-hunger and obesity prevention efforts by linking summer meal providers with nutrition education resources.
  • The White House Council studied coalitions that, like Boston’s on summer learning, were ambitious – aspiring to make a meaningful difference at the scale of an entire community.These efforts were built with the understanding that the work takes time, requiring patience and staying power.They were aided by bringing to the table a diverse set of voices from many sectors as active partners. And they shared a commitment to the idea that “the facts are friendly,” using data to set the agenda and drive improvements over time.
  • Among these ambitious collaboratives, the Council found the successful ones shared some key characteristics.They had developed a shared vision of success and an effective shared governance. They had agreed to align their resources, programs and advocacy so members could achieve more together than they could alone. They had designated a backbone organization of full-time people to implement the shared plan – because it’s too much to ask of a group made up solely of volunteers. And, perhaps the most obvious point, they had allocated resources sufficient to match the requirements of the solution they had developed.
  • Maa summer summit speech 2

    1. 1. School’s Out! SummerLearning Collaboration Is In
    2. 2. NSLA seeks to:• Improve the quality of summer learning opportunities• Expand access to summer learning• Increase demand for summer learning
    3. 3. Why Summer MattersThe Faucet Theory
    4. 4. Afterschool and SummerFaucet Theory: learningresources are turned on forall youth during the schoolyear because of equalaccess to public education.
    5. 5. Afterschool and Summer During the summer, the faucet is turned OFFfor low-income youth. A limited flow of resources in the summer hasmajor implications for summer programquality.
    6. 6. The Effects of Summer Learning Loss Since 1906, numerous studies have confirmed thatchildren experience learning losses in math andreading without continued opportunities for skillbuilding over the summer (White, Heyns, Cooper,Downey, Alexander) All youth lose an average of 2-3 months of mathskills without practice over the summer withoutpractice. Low-income youth lose an average of 1-3 monthsof grade level equivalency reading skills over thesummer without practice.
    7. 7. Up to 2/3 of the ninth grade readingachievement gap can be attributed tosummer learning loss in the elementaryyears alone.
    8. 8. AchievementorOpportunity?
    9. 9. “Virtually all of the advantage thatwealthy students have over poorstudents is the result of differences inthe way privileged kids learn when theyare not in school….America doesn’thave a school problem. It has a summervacation problem …”Malcolm Gladwell, Outliers, pp. 258 - 260
    10. 10. “It may seem counterintuitive, but schools don’tseem to produce much of the disparity in testscores between high- and low-incomestudents…There is some evidence that achievement gapsbetween high- and low-income studentsactually narrow during the nine-monthschool year, but they widen again in thesummer months.”Source: Sean Reardon, No Rich Child Left Behind, New York TimesOp-Ed, April 30, 2013.
    11. 11. What is the opportunity gap? Over the last 40 years, upper-income parentshave increased the amount they spend ontheir kids’ enrichment activities, like tutoringand extra curriculars, by $5,300 a year. Thefinancially stressed lower classes have onlybeen able to increase their investment by$480, adjusted for inflation.
    12. 12. 3,5365,6506,9758,8728351,264 1,173 1,31502,5005,0007,50010,0001972 to 1973 1983 to 1984 1994 to 1995 2005 to 2006Enrichment Expenditures on Children(in 2008 dollars)Top Quintile Income Bottom Quintile IncomeSource: Whither Opportunity?, 2011, Greg Duncan and Richard Murnane, ed., p. 11The growing opportunity gap
    13. 13. Summer Learning is a viablesolution to level theplaying field.
    14. 14. SchoolYearSummerSummer Learning and K-12Education
    15. 15. SchoolYearSummerSummer Learning and K-12Education
    16. 16. SchoolYearSummerSummer Learning and K-12Education
    17. 17. Tipping Point What would it take to change the trajectory ofschools through summer learning? 30% of kids and teachers?
    18. 18. What can WE do, together?
    19. 19. Who are summer learningstakeholders?
    20. 20. Children and Youth Build their academic skills Build their confidence Expose them to their future Inspire them to lead Strengthen them physically Build their network of support
    21. 21. Educators
    22. 22. Parents• 76 percent of parents feel more involved in theirchild’s education as a result of the summerprogram.• 82 percent of parents agree or strongly agree thatthe summer program helped them to focus ontheir job, job search, and/or school work.
    23. 23. Summer Learning Loss – Real, Not Urgent Parents view summer learning loss as real Many parents reported seeing it happen with their child But many parents do not understand summer learning loss can becumulative While they like the Summer Learning Program, parents did not seesummer learning opportunities as urgent Do not recognize importance of time spent learning during the summer as equal tothe regular school year When presented with information about the possible long-term effects of summerlearning loss parents then recognize the value of summer learningPage 24
    24. 24. Summer Learning Loss – Intervention Needed? Many parents believe that they can prevent or ameliorate the effectsof summer learning loss through self-managed methods Proactive parents feel that their “homemade” summer curriculum can substitutefor a formal program Less involved parents feel that next year’s teacher can fix summer learning loss- Catch up in the first month of the new school year- Extra review time at the start of the school yearPage 25
    25. 25. Schools and CBOs Schools are on the hook for achievement• Hold the data that can drive programming CBOs have capacity for scale and variety
    26. 26. Funders and Policymakers Need evidence to make the case!• Youth outcomes• Economic and social costs and benefits Need to be educated advocates Show evidence of collaboration
    27. 27. Re-teaching costs weeks of theschool year Up to 6 weeks spent re-teaching the previousyear’s skills each fall $1,667/$10,000 per pupil rate
    28. 28. Higher Ed and Business College and career ready students Workforce pipeline
    29. 29. Summer Learning CommunityReport Card
    30. 30. Our Challenge Set clear goals that direct and motivatecommunities. Provide guidance for action that is based onwhat works, but is flexible to suit eachcommunity.
    31. 31. Moving the Needle in SummerCoordinated civic action can lead to:• Increased awareness and action• Better understanding of quality and what works• Better practices that support more kids• Ability to track progress and show impact
    32. 32. Long-term Impact Increase the number of youth thatdemonstrate improved outcomes• What are the specific youth outcomes thecommunity wants to impact?• How much of an increase or improvement?• For how many youth?• By when?• How will you know if you were successful?
    33. 33. Intermediate Outcomes(Progress Indicators) Program level progress• More programs tracking targeted specific youthoutcomes• More programs focusing on improvement andquality• Improved quality of programs
    34. 34. Intermediate Outcomes(Progress Indicators) Community level progress• Increased partnerships• More capacity in existing programs• More programs targeting identified youthoutcomes• Development of new programs• Increase in targeted youth participating insummer learning programs
    35. 35. System Indicators1. Shared Vision and Citywide Coordination2. Engaged Leadership3. Data Management System4. Quality Improvement System5. Sustainable Resources6. Marketing and Communications Strategy
    36. 36. What’s possiblein the summer?
    37. 37. BostonBoston Summer Learning Project
    38. 38. “Unfortunately, in the search to find the “silver bullet” forAmerican education, afterschool and summer learning are oftenconsidered optional and, in a time of tight budgets, frequentlypitted against each other in competition for scarce resources. Amore productive approach is to explore afterschool and summerlearning as complementary strategies that can combine tostrengthen instruction during the regular school year.Understanding and leveraging this connection will enablegreater numbers of students to experience academic anddevelopmental success.”Boston Superintendent Carol Johnson
    39. 39. Boston Summer Learning Project Mayor Thomas Menino’s challenge to thecommunity Boston Opportunity Agenda – educationpipeline collaboration Public-private partnership using a networkingapproach to coordinate summer andafterschool programming Synthesized local and federal fundingstreams
    40. 40. Boston Summer Learning Project 2012 – 1,500 youth, 40 schools and 17community partner organizations Boston Public Schools utilizes Title I andFederal Food Program funding Common measures and indicators across allprograms Boston Public Schools assessment method tomeasure summer learning loss
    41. 41. Boston “ACT” Framework42
    42. 42. Boston Summer Learning Project
    43. 43. Boston Summer Learning Project
    44. 44. System Indicators1. Shared Vision and Citywide Coordination2. Engaged Leadership3. Data Management System4. Quality Improvement System5. Sustainable Resources6. Marketing and Communications Strategy
    45. 45. Baltimore CitySuper Summers
    46. 46. Baltimore City Super Summers Led by the Mayor’s office based on prioritiesset by the Mayor’s Youth Cabinet Partnership between city agencies, BaltimoreCity Public Schools, private sector, cityintermediary and community organizations Mission is to ensure that every Baltimore Citystudent has access to learning, meals, reading,and other fun activities during the summer
    47. 47.  Coordinated marketing, communications andoutreach strategy Central information portals – website and 211 Community canvassing – door-knocking andphone calls reached over 20,000 householdsBaltimore City Super Summers
    48. 48. California Summer MealsCoalitionFeeding and Reading
    49. 49. Connecting Summer Meals & Reading Partnership between California Summer MealCoalition and California Library Association In 2013, four community partnershipsbetween summer meal providers, publiclibraries and volunteer groups
    50. 50. Connecting Summer Meals & ReadingGoals: To increase access to summer meals by increasing thenumber of summer meal sponsors and meal sites inCalifornia. To build support for summer meal programs by engagingleaders and facilitating stronger community partnerships tocreate a summer “safety net.” To bridge anti-hunger and obesity prevention efforts bylinking summer meal providers with nutrition educationresources.
    51. 51. Summer Matters CampaignCalifornia
    52. 52. Summer Matters Campaign Steering Committee of state and nationalorganizations Legislative Task Force• Set aside of 21st Century funds• Increased flexibility in state funding to offer fullday program Funding to Technical Assistance providers andprograms (district, CBO and County)• Private investment built on publicinvestment
    53. 53. 54Successful collaborationsSource: White House Council for CommunitySolutions, Community Collaboratives Whitepaper, 2011
    54. 54. Successful collaborations55Source: White House Council for CommunitySolutions, Community Collaboratives Whitepaper, 2011
    55. 55. Collaboratives with:• Aspiration to needle-moving (e.g.10%+) change on a community-wide metric• Long-term investment in success• Cross-sector engagement• Use of data to set the agenda andimprove over time• Community members as partnersand producers of impact• Shared vision and agenda• Effective leadership andgovernance• Deliberate alignment ofresources, programs and advocacytoward what works• Dedicated capacity andappropriate structure• Sufficient resources• Knowledge• Tools• Technical assistance frompeers/experts• Policy• FundingSuccessful collaborationsSource: White House Council for CommunitySolutions, Community Collaboratives Whitepaper, 2011
    56. 56. NSLA Events and Resources New Vision for Summer School Network Funding Roadmap publication Summer Learning Day, June 21, EVERYWHERE National Conference, November 11-13,Orlando
    57. 57. AdvancingOutcomes forYouth:Demonstratingyour value in adata-driven ageRegister now atsummerlearning.org
    58. 58. THANK YOU!www.summerlearning.org

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