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Two point perspective for ks3
 

Two point perspective for ks3

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Two point persective for beginners in a step by step format. Aimed really at Key Stage 3 it is suitable also for GCSE courses in Graphics, RM and Product Design....

Two point persective for beginners in a step by step format. Aimed really at Key Stage 3 it is suitable also for GCSE courses in Graphics, RM and Product Design.
I have plenty of other slide shows for these courses. stevyn2003@yahoo.co.uk

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    Two point perspective for ks3 Two point perspective for ks3 Presentation Transcript

    • Two Point perspective for KS3Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • Do you remember one point perspectivewhere everything disappeared off to a point on the horizon?
    • Here is the horizon at the sea sideThe horizon is also known as ‘eye level’ because your eyes are level with it!
    • Well, two point perspective is even cooler than that, though it can be harder to draw until you’ve practised.Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • Like One Point Perspective, Two point has a horizon or ‘eye level’. Notice how you can only see the top or bottom of some of the boxes?
    • As you may expect by its name there are TWO vanishing pointsCopyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • Can you see the horizon and twovanishing points on these pictures? On each picture one of the vanishing points is well off the paper, to the left, beyond our field of vision.
    • This complex picture also has ahorizon and two vanishing points
    • The horizon on this picture is set deliberately high as if you are looking at it from a first floor window Can you see how you are looking down on the human figures?
    • Lets start by doing our own version of this picture.Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • Draw a 25 mm border around your A4 sheet set to landscape
    • Draw the horizon at about half way across the whole page Horizon
    • We are going to make vanishing points where your border touches the horizon, call them VP1 and VP2VP1 VP2
    • In the middle of the horizon draw a vertical line 40mm long that goes halfway above and below the lineVP1 VP2
    • From the top and bottom of this line LIGHTLY draw radial lines to the Vanishing Points. These are ‘construction lines’ are will not be seen in the end.VP1 VP2
    • About 45mm from the first vertical draw a parallel line between the two radials. 45VP1 VP2
    • Do the same on the other side but on 35mm away this time. You should start to see the first box now. 35VP1 VP2
    • Can you see the first box? Make it clear using strong ‘object lines’.VP1 VP2
    • About 20mm above the first vertical line you drew, draw another of the same length. i.e. 40mm. Don’t worry if you go slightly above the border. 40mm longVP1 VP2
    • Draw LIGHT radials to the VP’sVP1 VP2
    • Draw another vertical directly above the second line you drew to make the edge of the second box.VP1 VP2
    • Now LIGHTLY draw a radial to VP2 from the bottom of that line. Don’t worry if it passes through the first box.VP1 VP2
    • Now, using your judgement draw another construction line from VP1 to make the bottom of box two.VP1 VP2
    • From where this new line crosses the radial draw a vertical line up to make the side of the box. Can you see box two now?VP1 VP2
    • Use ‘object lines’ to make box two clear. It does not need to be the same size as box one.VP1 VP2
    • Just like we started box two, this time draw a vertical line below the nearest edge of box one.VP1 VP2 40mm long
    • Draw the radials to the vanishing points using construction lines.VP1 VP2
    • Draw a vertical line between the radials about 35mm parallel to the leading edge we have drawn.VP1 VP2
    • From the top of this line draw a radial to VP2 to show the top of box three.VP1 VP2
    • Use your judgement to draw a vertical between the radials to make the other side of box threeVP1 VP2
    • From the top of the vertical draw a radial to meet VP1. You should be able to see box three now.VP1 VP2
    • Use ‘object lines to make box three clear.VP1 VP2
    • VP1 VP2
    • Without the construction lines it would look like this. That’s why we draw them LIGHT. VP1 VP2Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • VP1 VP2
    • Maybe another over here… above and below the horizonVP1 VP2
    • How about we squeeze a little one in here?VP1 VP2
    • VP1 VP2
    • A big one at the back.?......VP1 VP2
    • How about an L-shaped box up here.?..... VP1 VP2Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • VP1 VP2
    • Room for two small ones down here.?....VP1 VP2
    • VP1 VP2
    • Try strengthening the outer lines of each block like this…..VP1 VP2
    • It makes them look 3D. This is called thick and thin line technique. VP1 VP2Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • This drawing was done using the same methods.
    • • Now for the hard one!! Lets see if we can put together a picture like this one….
    • See where the horizon and VP’s are? VP1 VP2Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • Start the horizon a lot higher up this time…we are looking down from a block of flats on the other side of the roadVP1 VP2
    • LIGHTLY draw these two radials for the front corner of the house. I’ve done them in colour to make it easier to see..VP1 VP2
    • LIGHTLY add a line to show the height of the bungalow and put a radial back to VP1.VP1 VP2
    • LIGHTLY add a radial from the top of this vertical to VP2VP1 VP2
    • Put in a vertical to show the depth of the front block.VP1 VP2
    • LIGHTLY put a radial from VP1 and through the bottom of the last line.VP1 VP2
    • Now put a radial through the top of the same line.VP1 VP2
    • Add a vertical to show the end of this block.VP1 VP2
    • Now put in a radial back to VP2VP1 VP2
    • Show the height of this wall by LIGHTLY drawing a radial back to VP2VP1 VP2
    • Use your judgement to put in a vertical to show the end of this part of the building.VP1 VP2
    • From the top of this new vertical make a LIGHT radial line to VP1 to show the top of the back wall.VP1 VP2
    • Now LIGHTLY put in this radial to VP2 to show the tops of all the wallsVP1 VP2 Next we are going to make an even pitched roof Starting with this wall
    • To find the centre of this wall LIGHTLY cross the diagonalsCopyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • From where they cross LIGHTLY project a vertical line upwards
    • From where this vertical bisects the top line of thewall put a LIGHT radial line to VP2. Make sure itmeets the top of the back wall.
    • Use your judgement to set the pitch of the roof by drawing from the walls top corners to this centre line.Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • From the top of the roof LIGHTLYdraw a radial back to VP2
    • Your drawing should look like this by now. Lets put the other end of this pitched roof on.VP1 VP2
    • I’ve zoomed in so you can see. LIGHTLY put this radial in from the top centre of the wall to VP2.Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • Where this new radial meets thetop of the back wall LIGHTLY drawa vertical
    • Where this vertical meets the top radial of the roof line we can now draw in a diagonal to show the slope of the roof Joins at this crossingCopyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • I’ve taken out a few construction line so you can see clearly what you’ve got. Lets put a pitch on the extension roof.VP1 VP2 Extension
    • I’ve zoomed in again. Like last time LIGHTLY put diagonals across the wall and add a vertical.Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • This bit is a bit unscientific, but I’m going toleave it to you to judge where the top of the roof is and draw in the diagonals to the top of this wall
    • From the top of this new roof drawa radial towards VP1 until it meets the top of the other roof here
    • From this crossing point draw a lineto the top corner of the walls here.
    • You should be able to see something like this now. I’m going to strengthen a couple of lines and fade out some construction.VP1 VP2
    • Believe it or not this is the basis from which you could produce something this thisVP1 VP2
    • Master copyVP1 VP2
    • By using the VP’s I could start to put in a porch and step.VP1 VP2 Close up construction on next slide
    • Here’s the construction for the porch. Can you see how I did it?Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • I can put in the barge boards and gutters to the roofVP1 VP2 Close up on next page
    • Here’s a close up of thatCopyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • Here’s the construction for the chimneyVP1 VP2 Close up on next slide
    • See how it came together using the two VP’s?Copyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • How about those windows?VP1 VP2 Close up on next page
    • Here’s the construction close upCopyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011
    • I’ve now made some of the lines solid…..VP1 VP2
    • Lets remind ourselves of the master copyVP1 VP2
    • It’s a simple matter to add the paths etc or to make up your ownVP1 VP2
    • Here’s one I’ve made up….VP1 VP2
    • And here’s the start of my ‘scene’..VP1 VP2
    • The End…for nowCopyright of Stephen J Walsh 2011