ENGR190D Winter 2013 Syllabus
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ENGR190D Winter 2013 Syllabus

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Syllabus for a ten week, four unit course based upon Steve Blank's Lean Launchpad Curriculum, taught at University of California, Santa Barbara, Winter Quarter 2013. Student teams validated business ...

Syllabus for a ten week, four unit course based upon Steve Blank's Lean Launchpad Curriculum, taught at University of California, Santa Barbara, Winter Quarter 2013. Student teams validated business models by conducting more than 80 customer and partner interviews per team during an 8-week period. Out-of-the building market validation was supplemented by weekly live lectures and the use of Blank's online "Lean Launchpad" video course at Udacity.com to provide students with a flipped-classroom, experiential approach to learning how to create a viable business model.

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    ENGR190D Winter 2013 Syllabus ENGR190D Winter 2013 Syllabus Document Transcript

    • ENGR 190D: Creating a Market-Tested Startup Business ModelCourse Title: Creating a Market-Tested Startup Business ModelUnits: 4Instructors: Steve Zahm / Craig Cummings / Doug LynchTA’s: TBDGrading: Letter (ABCD/NP)Days and Times: Mon/Wed 4:00-5:40pmOffice Hours: Wed 2:00-4:00pmLocation: Phelps 1508Webpage: LaunchPad Central, students must purchase subscriptionCourse Materials: Steve Blank, The Startup Owner’s Manual Note: Kindle Reader version is available at Amazon.com Alexander Osterwalder & Yves Pigneur, Business Model Generation Note that page numbers cited for reading assignments are all from the printed (i.e., non-Kindle) text versions. LaunchPad Central, a cloud-based course management application (available by subscription at launchpadcentral.com. Each student must purchase an individual subscription for approximately $30). Register at https://launchpadcentral.com/signup, Organization Code = (coming soon) Course lectures are available at: http://www.udacity.com/overview/Course/ep245/CourseRev/1 Students must register online separately to view the lectures Recommended Text: Eric Ries, The Lean Startup There will not be assigned readings from this text.Class materials and content are based extensively on the ideas and course materialscreated by Steve Blank and Bob Dorf. Learn more about Steve Blank and seeexamples of coursework using a similar syllabus at www.steveblank.com.Prerequisite: A passionate interest in discovering how an idea can become a realcompany.Goal: This course will provide an experiential learning opportunity showing how asuccessful business model can be created through the use of the Customer and MarketValidation process.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 1 of 25
    • Course Description:This course provides real world, hands-on learning on what it’s like to start a high-techcompany. This class is not about how to write a business plan. It’s not an exercise on howwell a student can use the library to research markets.This is an experiential class – essentially a lab, not a theory or “book” class. Our goal, withinthe constraints of a classroom and a limited amount of time, is to create an entrepreneurialexperience with all of the pressures and demands of an early stage startup.You will be talking to customers, partners, and competitors, as you encounter the chaos anduncertainty of how a startup actually works. You’ll work in teams learning how to turn agreat idea into a great company. You’ll learn how to use a business model to brainstormeach part of a company and the customer development and market validation process toget out of the classroom to see whether anyone other than you would want or use yourproduct.Class CultureStartups communicate much differently than inside a university or a large company. Attimes this communication style can feel brusque and impersonal, but in reality it is focusedand oriented to create immediate action in time- and cash-constrained environments. Theinstructors for this course have limited time and we will push, challenge, and question you inthe hope you will quickly learn. The instructors will be direct, open, and tough – just like thereal world. These comments aren’t personal, but they are part of the learning process.We also expect you to question the teaching team, and to challenge our point of view if youdisagree, and to engage in a real dialogue with the teaching team. We want you to learn tochallenge yourselves quickly and objectively, and to appreciate that as entrepreneurs youneed to learn and evolve faster than you ever imagined possible.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 2 of 25
    • Amount of WorkNOTE: This class requires a large amount of work on the part of every student.Projects are treated as real startup companies, so the workload will be intense. Teams havereported up to 20 hours of work per week, per team. Getting out of the classroom is whatthe course effort is about. It’s not about the lectures. In fact, lectures will be providedoutside of the actual class sessions, using online videos recorded by Steve Blank.You will be spending a significant amount of time in between each of the class sessionstalking to customers. If you can’t commit the time to talk to customers, this class is not foryou. This class is a simulation of what startups and entrepreneurship is like in the realworld: chaos, uncertainly, impossible deadlines in insufficient time, conflicting input, etc.This class pushes many people past their comfort zone. Its not about you, but its also notabout the class or the teaching team. This is what startups are like. The pace and theuncertainty may increase as the class proceeds.Team Organization: This class is team-based. Working and studying will be done inteams. Each student will only be admitted as a team member. Teams must submit aproposal for entry before the class begins. Projects and teams must be approved before theclass begins in January.Team projects can be software, a physical product, or a service of any kind. The teams willself-organize and establish individual roles on their own. There are no formal titles amongteam members.Besides the instructors and TA’s, each team will be assigned an industry mentor. Thementor will be an experienced entrepreneur or venture capitalist, and his or her role will beto provide assistance and support. Each team will be required to meet weekly with itsassigned mentor using a scheduled online videoconference (we suggest using Google+Hangouts for this purpose).Suggested Projects: While your first instinct may be a web-based startup, we suggest thatyou consider a subject in which you are a domain expert. In all cases, you should choosesomething for which you have passion, enthusiasm, and hopefully some expertise. Whilenot required, teams that build a web or mobile-based minimally viable application will berecognized for their additional efforts through extra credit towards their final grade.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 3 of 25
    • Deliverables 1. Your weekly record of customer interactions as recorded on LaunchPad Central will be the core element of your course deliverables. You will be required to use the LaunchPad Central online blogging tool to author your course blog, as well as to gather input from the teaching team and your industry mentor. 2. Your team will present a weekly in-class PowerPoint summary of the progress you make in your customer and market validation efforts. 3. Your final presentation will consist of a 10 minute “Lessons Learned” PowerPoint, as well as a 2-minute video outlining your customer and market validation journey. 4. Teams proposing a physical product may gain extra credit by building a prototype and providing the teaching team with a costed bill of materials. 5. Teams building a web product or mobile application may gain extra credit by building a minimally viable product, generating demand and have customers using it. See http://steveblank.com/2011/09/22/how-to-build-a-web-startup-lean-launchpad- edition/Grading CriteriaThis course is team-based. 85% of your grade will come from your team progress and finalproject. The grading criteria are broken down as follows:15% Individual participation in class. You will be giving feedback to your peers by using a shared Google Docs file. The individual participation grade will depend upon the quality and value of your feedback.40% Out-of-the-building progress as measured by customer interview write-ups and team presentations each week. Using LaunchPad Central, team members must: 1) update their business model canvas weekly 2) identify which team member did which portion of the work 3) log detailed reports on what the team did each week 4) log the results of your online meeting with your team’s industry mentor20% - The team weekly “lesson learned” presentation (see appendix for format)25% - The team final presentation and 2-minute video (see appendix for format)NOTE: Grading will be based upon a team member’s ability to demonstrably go through theENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 4 of 25
    • process and journey of customer and market validation. A failed business idea will notnecessarily result in a low grade, and may in fact receive high marks. If a business failure isthe team’s outcome, it will not automatically produce a failing grade.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 5 of 25
    • Class Roadmap Each week’s class is organized around: • Student team presentations on “lessons learned” from getting out of the building and iterating or pivoting their business model. • Comments and suggestions from other teams, and the teaching team, on the lessons learned. • An online lecture, viewed prior to each week’s class, on one of the 9 building blocks of a business model. The online class lectures are available free of charge, but each student must register for the course separately at the following URL: • http://www.udacity.com/overview/Course/ep245/CourseRev/1 • Each team will capture their progression in learning by keeping an online blog using LaunchPad Central.   Test Hypotheses: Test Agile • Demand Hypotheses: Development Test Hypotheses: Creation   • Problem   • Product   Test • Customer   Hypotheses: • Market Type   • User   • Channel   • Competitive   • Payer   • (Customer)   • (Problem)   Customer Development Test Hypotheses: Team • Channel   Test Hypotheses: Test Hypotheses: • Size of Opportunity/Market   • Pricing Model / Pricing   • Validate Business Model   ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 6 of 25
    • To Apply for Admittance to This Course:Prior to the team interview session, you must:• Review Steve Blank’s online course strategy at http://youtu.be/VZvgj6B2JZs• Review team final presentations http://www.slideshare.net/sblank/tagged/stanford Examples: Nudge E245 Final Presentation, Colorwheels E245 Final Presentation (Note the number of customer interviews teams conducted during the course.)• Watch “An Introduction to the Business Model Canvas” by Alexander Osterwalder http://steveblank.files.wordpress.com/2012/04/osterwalder-guest-talk-012912.mov• Come up with a preliminary company/product idea• Form a team of 4 people. Choose your team members well!• There are two student-focused New Venture Competition events prior to the class, November 16th (6-8pm, ESB 1001) and November 28th (6-8:30pm, ESB 1001). Use these events to meet other interested students who could be potential team members.• Complete the ENGR 190D Application Form and submit to the TMP Office (the form is the last page of this syllabus)• Once notified by the TMP Office Staff that you are being offered a team interview, contact the TMP Office to schedule a course-admittance interview on either December 3rd or December 4th. You must attend the interview with your entire team.• Ten teams will be offered admission to the course, no later than December 7th.NO ONE WILL BE ADMITTED TO THE CLASS WITHOUT BEING PART OF A TEAMAND HAVING AN APPROVED PROJECTPre-Class PreparationIf your team is admitted to the course, prior to the first class session, you must:• Read pages 14-49 of Osterwalder’s Business Model Generation.• Read The Startup Owner’s Manual, pages 1-50• Register for the Udacity.com course “How to Build a Startup” (EP245) by going to: http://www.udacity.com/overview/Course/ep245/CourseRev/1• Name your team and use that team name when registering for LaunchPad Central• Register for LaunchPad Central by going to: https://launchpadcentral.com/signup and using Organization Code = (coming soon)• Download a PowerPoint version of the Osterwalder Business Model Canvas from the LaunchPad Central Resource Hub. You must use a filled-in version of the Business Model Canvas in each of your weekly presentations.• Review the class syllabus “Week 1” details. You will be expected to present a completed business model canvas with your team during the first weeks class session on January 7th or 9th. You will also be expected to have completed the work required in the “Actions to Prepare for This Week’s Presentation,” “Watch Before Class,” and “Read Before Class” sections of the syllabus for those days.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 7 of 25
    • (All Weeks) Agenda for Class SessionsEach class session is 100 minutes long (4pm-5:40pm, M-W). We will take a five minutebreak at 5pm each class. Please be prepared to present your team’s progress in everyclass session. Five teams will present during each class session for 10 to 15 minutes each.There is one acceptable format for weekly presentations:Team Presentations: 10-15 minutes each • Slide 1: Cover slide with Team name • Slide 2: Current business model canvas with any changes marked • Slide 3: What did you learn about your value proposition from talking to your first customers? • Hypothesis: Here’s What We Thought • Experiments: So Here’s What We Did • Results: So Here’s What We Found • Iterate: So Here’s What We Are Going to Do Next • Slides 4+: Cover the “Items to Address” for the week in one slide. These items must be addressed in no more than 3 additional slides.Do not vary from this format – we are interested in results, not presentation design.If your team has not presented the prior class session, you will be expected to presentduring the next class. Each team presentation will follow the same format of presenting theoverall business model canvas, the hypothesis that was tested during the prior week, theresults of the test, and the learning that came from that test. After the presentation, theteaching team will provide feedback about the presenting team’s approach, methodology,execution, and conclusions. The teaching team may also request input from other students.Students in class will record their comments and impressions from the studentpresentations on a shared Google Doc. Individual class participation grades will be largelybased upon the quality and insight of a student’s comments and suggestions on this form.We suggest that each team schedule their industry mentor videoconference (using Google+Hangouts) for a time before the class session during which the team will present. Thepurpose of the mentor session is to receive feedback from the mentor on that week’s up-coming presentation.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 8 of 25
    • Week 1 Jan 7th – Jan 9thSubject Matter: Intro/Business Model/Customer DevelopmentWhat’s a business model? What are the 9 parts of a business model? What arehypotheses? What is the Minimum Feature Set? What experiments are needed to run totest business model hypotheses? What is market size? How can you determine whether abusiness model is worth doing?Items To Address in This Week’s Presentations: • Write down hypotheses for each of the 9 parts of the business model. • Come up with ways to test: o Is your business opportunity worth pursuing? (market size) o Each of the your business model canvas hypotheses • Come up with what constitutes a pass/fail signal for the test (e.g. at what point would you say that your hypotheses wasn’t even close to correct)?Actions To Prepare for This Week’s Presentation: • Be prepared to present your business model canvas with your team for 3 minutes. You must have a slide version of Osterwalder’s Business Model Canvas filled out with your team’s initial entries for all nine boxes of the canvas. • Conduct a test videoconference with all team members and your industry mentor. Google+ Hangouts are free for multiple participants while Skype requires an active payment plan for multiple video attendees. You must conduct a videoconference so that you can view your mentor and so that he/she can see you. • Make sure you are registered for both LaunchPad Central and the Udacity online lectures • Start team blog on LaunchPad CentralWatch Before Class: • Udacity.com “How to Build a Startup (EP245): Lecture 1 – What We Now Know” and “Lecture 2 – Business Models and Customer Development”Read Before Class: • Business Model Generation, pp. 86-119, 135-145 • The Startup Owner’s Manual, pages 1-50 • Blog post: Steve Blank, “What’s a Startup? First Principles,” http://steveblank.com/2010/01/25/whats-a-startup-first-principles/ • Blog post: Steve Blank, “Make No Little Plans – Defining the Scalable Startup,” http://steveblank.com/2010/01/04/make-no-little-plans-–-defining-the-scalable- startup/ • Blog post: Steve Blank, “A Startup is Not a Smaller Version of a Large Company”, http://steveblank.com/2010/01/14/a-startup-is-not-a-smaller-version-of-a-large- company/ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 9 of 25
    • Week 2 Jan 14th – Jan 16thSubject Matter: The Value PropositionWhat is your product or service? How does it differ from an idea? Why will people want it?Who’s the competition and how does your customer view these competitive offerings?Where’s the market? What’s the minimum feature set for your product? What’s the MarketType? What was your inspiration or impetus? What assumptions drove you to this? Whatunique insight do you have into the market dynamics or into a technological shift that makesthis a fresh opportunity?Items To Address in This Week’s Presentations: • What were your value proposition hypotheses? • What did you discover from customers? • Market Size estimates (TAM, SAM, addressable) -- include in your presentationActions to Prepare for This Week’s Presentation: • Get out of the building and talk to 10-15 customers face-to-face • Update LaunchPad Central with the results of your customer interviews • Be prepared to present your business model canvas with your team. • Hold your scheduled mentor videoconferenceWatch Before Class: • Udacity.com “How to Build a Startup (EP245): Lecture 3 – Value Proposition”Read Before Class: • Business Model Generation, pp. 161-167 and 226-231 • The Startup Owner’s Manual, pages 51-84: market size, value proposition and MVP; pp. 188-199: getting out of the building; 457-459 market type • Blog Post: Giff Constable, “12 Tips for Early Customer Development Interviews,” http://giffconstable.com/2010/07/12-tips-for-early-customer-development-interviews/ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 10 of 25
    • Week 3 Jan 23rdNOTE: No class session on January 21st. Get out of the building and get ahead onyour customer interviews! If necessary, be sure to re-schedule your weekly mentoronline meeting session. Due to shortened time available for team presentations, yourLaunchPad Central entries will be closely reviewed by the teaching team this week –make sure the entries are detailed and comprehensive.Subject Matter: Customer SegmentsWho’s the customer? User? Payer? How are they different? How can you reach them?How is a business customer different from a consumer?Items To Address in This Week’s Presentation • What were your hypotheses about who your users and customers were? Did you learn anything different? • Draw the diagram of “customer flow” and include in your presentation • What are your hypotheses around customer acquisition costs? Can you articulate the direct benefits (economic or other) that are apparent? • If your customer is part of a company, who is the decision maker, how large is the budget they have authority over, what are they spending it on today, and how are they individually evaluated within that organization, and how will this buying decision be made? • What is it about your business model that resonates with customers? • Did anything change about your Value Proposition?Actions to Prepare for This Week’s Presentation: • Get out of the building and talk to 10-15 customers face-to-face • Update LaunchPad Central with the results of your customer interviews • Be prepared to present your business model canvas with your team. • Hold your scheduled mentor videoconferenceWatch Before Class: • Udacity.com “How to Build a Startup (EP245): Lecture 4 – Customer Segments”Read Before Class: • Business Model Generation, pp. 146-150, 161-168, 200-211 • The Startup Owner’s Manual, pp. 85-97, 112-125, 203-217, 218-221, 260-266ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 11 of 25
    • Week 4 Jan 28th-Jan 30thSubject Matter: The ChannelWhat’s a channel? Direct channels, indirect channels, OEM. Multi-sided markets. B-to-Bversus B-to-C channels and sales (business to business versus business to consumer)Items to Address in This Week’s Presentation: • What is your assumed customer lifetime value? Are there any proxy companies that would suggest that this is a reasonable number? • Channel incentives – does your product or proposition extend or replace existing revenue for the channel? • What is the “cost” of your channel, and it’s efficiency vs. your selling price. • What are the barriers to entry? • What kind of initial feedback did you receive from your users? • Did anything change about Value Proposition or Customers/Users?Actions to Prepare for This Week’s Presentation: • Get out of the building and talk to 10-15 customers or channel participants face-to- face • Update LaunchPad Central with the results of your customer interviews • Be prepared to present your business model canvas with your team. • Hold your scheduled mentor videoconferenceWatch Before Class: • Udacity.com “How to Build a Startup (EP245): Lecture 5 – Channels”Read Before Class: • Business Model Generation, pp. 127-133 • Startup Owners Manual, pp. 98-111, pp. 332-342, pp. 406-412ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 12 of 25
    • Week 5 Feb 4th - Feb 6thSubject Matter: Customer Relationships/Demand CreationHow do you create end user demand? How does it differ on the web versus otherchannels? Evangelism vs. existing need or category? General Marketing, Sales Funnel,etc.Items to Address in This Week’s Presentation: • Present and explain your marketing campaign. What worked best and why? • Did anything change about Value Proposition, Customers/Users or Channel?Actions to Prepare for This Week’s Presentation: • Get out of the building and talk to 10-15 customers face-to-face • Update LaunchPad Central with the results of your customer interviews • Be prepared to present your business model canvas with your team. • Hold your scheduled mentor videoconferenceWatch Before Class: • Udacity.com “How to Build a Startup (EP245): Lecture 6 – Customer Relations”Read Before Class: • The Startup Owners Manual, pp. 126-168, pp. 296-351 • Blog post: Dave McClure, “Startup Metrics for Pirates”, http://www.slideshare.net/dmc500hats/startup-metrics-for-pirates-seedcamp-2008- presentation • Blog post: Dan Siroker, “How Obama Raised $60 Million by Running a Simple Experiment”, http://blog.optimizely.com/how-obama-raised-60-million-by-running-an- expENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 13 of 25
    • Week 6 Feb 11th - Feb 13thSubject Matter: The Revenue ModelWhat’s a revenue model? What types of revenue streams are there? How does it differ onthe web versus other channels?Items to Address in This Week’s Presentation: • Test pricing in front of 10-15 customers • What’s your business revenue model? • How will you package your product into various offerings if you have more than one? • How will you price the offerings? • What are the key financials metrics for your business model? • What are the risks involved? • What are your competitors doing? • Assemble an income statement for the your business model. Lifetime value calculation for customers. • Draw a diagram of your model’s payment flows • Did anything change about Value Proposition or Customers/Users, Channel, Demand Creation?Actions to Prepare for This Week’s Presentation: • Get out of the building and talk to 10-15 customers face-to-face • Update LaunchPad Central with the results of your customer interviews • Be prepared to present your business model canvas with your team. • Hold your scheduled mentor videoconferenceWatch Before Class: • Udacity.com “How to Build a Startup (EP245): Lecture 7 – Revenue Models” • Mark Pincus, “Quick and Frequent Product Testing and Assessment”, http://ecorner.stanford.edu/authorMaterialInfo.html?mid=2313Read Before Class: • The Startup Owner’s Manual, pp. 180-188, pp. 260-269, pp. 438-456ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 14 of 25
    • Week 7 Feb 20thNOTE: No class session on February 18th. Get out of the building and get ahead onyour customer interviews. If necessary, be sure to re-schedule your weekly mentoronline meeting session. Due to shortened time available for team presentations, yourLaunchPad Central entries will be closely reviewed by the teaching team this week –make sure the entries are detailed and comprehensive.Subject Matter: PartnersWho are your partners? Strategic alliances, competition, joint ventures, buyer supplier,licensees.Items to Address in This Week’s Presentation: • Talk to actual partner candidates as part of your 10-15 interviews. • What partners will you need? • Why do you need them and what are risks? • What are the incentives and impediments for the partners? • Why will they partner with you? • What are the benefits for an exclusive partnership? • What’s the cost of the partnership? • Did anything change about Value Proposition or Customers/Users, Channel, Demand Creation, Revenue Model?Actions to Prepare for This Week’s Presentation: • Get out of the building and talk to 10-15 customers/partner candidates face-to-face • Update LaunchPad Central with the results of your customer interviews • Be prepared to present your business model canvas with your team. • Hold your scheduled mentor videoconferenceWatch Before Class: • Udacity.com “How to Build a Startup (EP245): Lecture 8 – Partners”Read Before Class: • The Startup Owner’s Manual, pp. 176-179, 257-270, 429-459ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 15 of 25
    • Week 8 Feb 25th – Feb 27thSubject Matter: Key Resources & Cost StructureWhat resources do you need to build this business? How many people? What kind? Anyhardware or software you need to buy? Any IP you need to license? How much money doyou need to raise? When? Why? What is the importance of cash flows? When do you getpaid vs. when do you pay others?Items to Address in This Week’s Presentation: • What’s your expense model? • What are the key financials metrics for costs in your business model? • Costs vs. ramp vs. product iteration? • Access to resources. What is the best location for your business? • Where is your cash flow break-even point? • Assemble a resources assumptions spreadsheet. Include people, hardware, software, prototypes, financing, etc. • Draw the diagram of a finance and operations timeline • When will you need these resources? • Roll up all the costs from partners, resources and activities in a spreadsheet by time. • Did anything change about Value Proposition or Customers/Users, Channel, Demand Creation, Revenue Model, Partners?Actions to Prepare for This Week’s Presentation: • Get out of the building and talk to 10-15 customers face-to-face • Update LaunchPad Central with the results of your customer interviews • Be prepared to present your business model canvas with your team. • Hold your scheduled mentor videoconferenceWatch Before Class: • Udacity.com “How to Build a Startup (EP245): Lecture 9 – Resources, Activities and Costs”Read Before Class: • The Startup Owner’s Manual, pgs. 169-175, 180-188ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 16 of 25
    • Week 9 Subject Matter: Preparation for Final PresentationsMarch 4th Class Summation: What Have We Accomplished?March 6th Presentation Rehearsals & Questions • Review: Autonomow, Mammoptics, Agora, and Personal Libraries final presentations (available on http://www.slideshare.net/, search by project name)Well talk through some these example slides and presentations from previous coursestaught by Steve Blank, discuss the presentation format were asking you to follow and thereason(s) why, and then well be working with all of the teams on an ad hoc basis, walkingaround, talking about where you are, what youre working on, answering questions, andencouraging you as we all whip our presentations into shape.Week 10 Subject Matter: Lessons Learned PresentationsMarch 11th Team Presentations of Lessons Learned (Five Teams)Each team will present a 10-minute “Lessons Learned” presentation about theirbusiness in front of the teaching team and potential investors, and a 2-minute video.March 13th Team Presentations of Lessons Learned (Five Teams)Each team will present a 10-minute “Lessons Learned” presentation about theirbusiness in front of the teaching team and potential investors, and a 2-minute video.Note that this course will not have a Final Exam or Course Session after March 13th.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 17 of 25
    • Lessons Learned – Final Team Presentation Format10 to 12-minutes: Team Videos & Lessons Learned PresentationsDeliverable: Each team will present a 2-minute video and then provide an 8-10-minute“Lessons Learned” presentation about their business.“Lessons Learned” Presentation Format▪ First: Play your two-minute video. The video should illustrate your business model idea and the lessons learned on the journey of customer and market validation.▪ Slide 1: Team Name, your product, what business you ended up in and number of customers you talked to.▪ Slide 2: Team members – name, background, expertise and your role for the team▪ Slide 4: The size of the opportunity▪ Slide 5: Business Model Canvas Version 1 (use the Osterwalder Canvas). So here’s what we did (explain how you got out of the building)▪ Slide 6: So here’s what we found (what was reality) so then, …▪ Slide 7: Business Model Canvas Version 2 (use the Osterwalder Canvas). We iterated or pivoted…explain why and what you found.▪ Slide 8: So here’s what we did (explain how you got out of the building)▪ Slide 9: So here’s what we found (what was reality) so then,▪ Slide 10: Business Model Canvas Version 3 (use the Osterwalder Canvas). We iterated or pivoted…explain why and what you found.▪ Etc… Every presentation requires at least three Business Model Canvas slides.▪ Etc… Every presentation requires a channel diagram, distribution diagram and customer archetype or customer flow diagram.▪ Etc… Every presentation requires hypotheses you tested, experiments you ran and the results of those experiments.▪ Side n – “So here’s where we ended up.” Talk about: 1. what you learned; 2. whether you think this a viable business; andENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 18 of 25
    • 3. whether you want to pursue this business idea after the class.▪ Final Slides – Click through each one of your business model canvas slides.Links to online examples of final “Lessons Learned” presentations:See http://www.slideshare.net/sblank/tagged/stanfordExamples include Colorwheel, Gamespeed, Parkpoint, Zillion, etc.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 19 of 25
    • Engineering 190D Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)Enrollment• Admission is by teams of 4 individuals.• Your entire team must attend the first class to be enrolled.• Teams must interview with the teaching team prior to the class start date.• Enrollment application closes on November 30th.• The class list and any wait-listed students will be posted online by midnight December 7th.• There are two student-focused New Venture Competition events prior to the class, November 16th (6-8pm, ESB 1001) and November 28th (6-8:30pm, ESB 1001). Use these events to meet other interested students who could be potential team members.Students▪ ENGR 190D is only open to students at UCSB from any school or department.▪ Each team must have at least 4 students.▪ Exceptions for team size and external members will be made on a case-by-case basis. Note your special team needs on your application form. We will let you know on Day 1 of the class.▪ This is very intense class with a very high workload. We expect you to invest at least 5-10 hours per week outside of the classroom.▪ You cannot miss the first class without prior approvalCompany Ideas▪ Is this class for web startups only? No, anyone with any idea and preferably a product can form or join a team▪ What if I do want to test a web idea? Great. Only condition is that you have to get the site up and deliver the minimum product feature set during the quarter.Team Formation• Do I need to be part of a team before I enroll in class? Yes.• Does my team need to have a product/business idea to enroll in ENGR 190D? Yes• How do teams form? Will I be assigned to a team? We do not assign members to teams. The mixer sessions will introduce you to potential team members. We also suggest using LinkedIn to find students with an appropriateENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 20 of 25
    • skillset. Don’t have a LinkedIn profile? Build one now, you’ll have it for life.• How many people compose a team? Typically, 4.Attendance and Participation▪ You cannot miss the first class without prior approval▪ If you cannot commit to 15-20 hours a week as a team outside the classroom, this class is not for you.▪ The startup culture at times can feel brusque and impersonal, but in reality is focused and oriented to create immediate action in time- and cash-constrained environments.▪ If during the quarter you find you cannot continue to commit the time, immediately notify your team members and teaching team and drop the class.▪ If you expect to miss a class, please let the TA’s and your team members know ahead of time via email.▪ The teaching team WILL cold call in class. Be prepared.▪ Your class participation grade will be based in large part upon constructive comments made to fellow student teams during their presentations. Comments will be entered into a shared Google Docs form that is visible to all enrolled students. We expect your attention during our presentations and those of your fellow students. If you’re getting bored, tired or inattentive step outside for some air. If we see reading email or browsing the web we will ask you to leave the class.▪ We ask that you use a name card during every session of the quarter.Intellectual Property• Who owns the intellectual property tested in the Business Model? 1. You own what Intellectual Property (patents, hardware, algorithms, etc.) you brought to class with you. No one has claim to anything you brought to class. 2. You all own any intellectual property developed for the class (such as code for a web- based project) developed during class. If a team is working with a UCSB related- technology (i.e. either research from one of the team members or a UCSB patent), you must check with the Office of Technology & Licensing to better understand any UCSB licensing and royalties issues. 3. You and your team members need to disclose to each other what IP/Licensing rights any company you’ve worked at has to inventions you make at school. 4. If any or you decide to start a company based on the class, you own only what was written and completed in the class. You have no claim for work done before or after theENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 21 of 25
    • class quarter. 4. If a subset of the team decides to start a company they do NOT “owe” anything to any other team members for work done in and during the class. All team members are free to start the same company, without permission of the others. (We would hope that a modicum of common sense and fairness would apply.)• I feel my idea / Business Model may become a real company and the "next killer app" and I want to own it myself what should I do? This is more than likely the wrong class to take. Your slides, notes and findings will be publically shared. Your team owns everything done in class. Discuss Intellectual Property rights with your team from the beginning. If you can’t come to agreement with the team, join another team, pick another project, or drop the class. Remember anything you do and learn in the class is public.• Will my Intellectual Property rights be protected when I discuss my ideas with the class? NO. This is an open class. There are no non-disclosures. All your presentations and Customer Discovery and Validation notes, business model canvas, blogs and slides can, and more likely will, be made public.• This class is not an incubator. At times you will learn by seeing how previous classes solved the same class of problem by looking at their slides, notes and blogs. Keep in mind that successful companies are less about the original idea and more about the learning, discovery and execution. (That’s the purpose of this class.) Therefore you must be prepared to share your ideas openly with the class. It is a forum for you to "bounce" your ideas off your peers.• I’m not comfortable sharing what I learn with others, what should I do? Don’t take this class.Help!• What kind of support will our team have? The teaching team consists of three lecturers, two TA’s and at one mentor per team. A mentor is an experienced entrepreneur or venture capitalist assigned to your team. They’ve volunteered to help with the class and your team because they love startups. Their job is to guide you as you get of the building.• How often can we/should we meet with our mentors?ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 22 of 25
    • Your mentor is expecting to meet with you at least every week using an online video conferencing tool. You can email them or meet with them more often, or in person, as they have time for.• Can I talk to a mentor not assigned to my team? By all means, do so. All the mentors are happy to help. However they cannot support your team full time unless your mentor decides to swap places with them.• I have a busy schedule and my mentor can’t meet when I want them to. Mentors have day jobs. Asking them to meet or reply to you ASAP is not acceptable. So plan ahead to allow for a reasonable amount of time for a reply or meeting. Be concise with your request and be respectful of their time. Ideally, you will meet via online videoconference on the same day, and at the same time each week in order to review your weekly progress.• I need help now. You first stop are your TA’s. Email or sit down with them during the week if you have a problem. Your professors have office hours every Monday and Wednesday from 2-4pm. If you need something resolved sooner, email us.Team Dynamics• What roles are in each team? Traditionally, each team member is part of the “customer development team”. You have to figure out how to allocate the work.• What if my team becomes dysfunctional? Prepare to work through difficult issues. If the situation continues, approach the teaching team. Do not wait until the end of the quarter to raise the issue.• What if one of my teammates is not "pulling his/her weight"? Try to resolve it within your team. If the situation continues longer than a week, please approach the teaching team. Final grades will also reflect individual participation and contribution.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 23 of 25
    • Grading▪ How do you determine our grade?▪ 15% Individual participation in class. You will be giving feedback to your peers.▪ 40% out-of-the-building progress as measured by blog write-ups each week. Team members must: 1) update business model canvas weekly 2) identify which team member did which portion of the work. 3) detailed report on what the team did each week 4) weekly email of team member participation▪ 20% team weekly “lesson learned” summaries (see appendix for format)▪ 25% team final report (see appendix for format)▪ Does everyone in the team get the same grade? No. Individual participation and contribution is also considered. You will get to grade your team members on their contribution.• What kind of feedback can I expect? Continual feedback weekly and online via LaunchPad Central. Substandard quality work will be immediately brought to your attention.• Can I take this class Pass/No Credit? No. Letter grade only.ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 24 of 25
    • ENGR 190D Application FormThis application is how we choose the students who make it into the class. We’reinterested in your background and why you want to take the class.Who are you? 1. First Name, Last Name 2. Student ID Number 3. Email Address 4. Phone NumberWhat are you studying? 1. Undergraduate School, Major and Graduation Year 2. Do you have any non-academic work experience? If so, what? 3. What unique talent or expertise do you bring to the class?Why This Class? 1. How did you hear about this course? 2. Why do you want to take this class?Team/Company Idea? 1. Who are the members of your team, and what’s the idea? 2. Why is this the best idea you can come with?Why You?If there was one spot left in the class and we were choosing between you andanother applicant, tell us why you should be the person in the class? Your team?ENGR190D Syllabus 2012 Revision 1 page 25 of 25