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Humanising elearning using illustrated characters

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A presentation given at the ED-MEDIA 2008 conference.

A presentation given at the ED-MEDIA 2008 conference.

Published in: Education, Technology
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  • Transcript

    • 1. 04.07.08 Humanising elearning using illustrated characters
        • Barry Kayton
        • Steve Vosloo
    • 2. Who we are
      • Barry Kayton @ Bright Sparks
      • Steve Vosloo @ Shuttleworth Foundation
    • 3. Kusasa: “tomorrow”
      • Open-source e-learning initiative to develop analytical thinking skills in learners and more effective teaching practices in teachers
      • How? A software programming-based learning environment that is teacher facilitated (as opposed to taught) and partly peer-taught
      • Support teaching of curriculum
      • Grades 4-12 in SA. 6 pilot schools (gr 4)
      • 2005-2010 – a “work in progress”
    • 4. Why?
      • Chronic shortage of maths and science teachers in SA
      • Mathematical, scientific and analytical thinking is not being developed
      • Classroom disconnect because of digital amusements
      • Increasing access to computer labs
    • 5. Approach
      • Develop HOTS by engaging learners
      • Facilitate exploration (Piaget's constructivism) and creation (Papert's constructionism)
      • Kusasa: a whole learning system which includes software, curriculum-aligned content, and teacher training materials
        • “ Our purpose is to enrich learners with deeply mathematical and scientific experiences that are wrapped up with enjoyable feelings”
    • 6.  
    • 7. Software
      • LAMS
        • LMS. Leaning activity sequencing and monitoring
        • Account management, Q&A, noticeboard, multiple choice, forum, survey ...
      • Squeak eToys
        • Visual programming/modelling language and environment designed for young children
        • Objects with headings, angles, variables, motion, time, speed, acceleration
        • Papert's constructionist approach: create public artefacts, engaged learning through active, playful construction
    • 8. Process
      • LAMS holds together:
      • Comic
        • Crunch/Reflection
      • Class exercise
        • Crunch/Reflection
      • eToys
        • Crunch/Reflection
    • 9.  
    • 10. Role models
      • Role model some of the targeted learning outcomes – such as analytical thinking or interpersonal life skills
      • Role model positive behaviours, thinking styles, attitudes and values – “Cognitive apprenticeship” (Berryman 1991; Coman 2002)
      • Characters with personalities – not just talking heads!
    • 11. Why comics?
      • Comics motivate and engage (Hutchinson 1949; Sones 1944; Wax 2002)
      • Help learners with “low and middle intelligence levels” (Sones 1944) to grasp issues that they grapple with when only presented in text form
      • “ In the struggle to engage students of all dispositions” comics can prove to be a formidable tool (Yang 2003)
      • Create an emotional connection between learners and the characters (Versaci 2001) – “humanise elearning” for compelling role modelling
    • 12. The facilitator/teacher
      • Facilitates sessions, crunch questions ...
      • Guides the characters
      • Good teacher model to learners (for some the only role model)
      • Good teacher model to teachers
      • Non-authoritarian
    • 13.  
    • 14. Four thinking styles Sophie Reads Questions Opinionated Sceptical Farrah Dances Draws Trusts Gullible Jojo Energetic Doer Body Action Tom Logical Mathematical Invents Experiments
    • 15.  
    • 16.  
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    • 19.  
    • 20.  
    • 21.  
    • 22.  
    • 23. Characters as role models of attitudes and values
      • Tom demonstrates the problem of making unwarranted assumptions and the value of breaking assumptions
      • Farrah’s story shows the dangers of being gullible and the value of making sensible inferences
      • Jojo models what it means to change your point of view
      • Sophie demonstrates the power of thinking in terms of questions
      • Characters question and support each other , modelling peer-to-peer teaching and learning
    • 24. Metacognition
      • Key component of HOTS
      • “ To be or not to be?” -- Hamlet
      • Thought bubbles: thinking about a problem, thinking about the thinking they are applying to that problem
      • Visual back-and-forth, internal dialogue
    • 25.  
    • 26. Challenges
      • Illustrated comics are time and resource heavy
      • Creative director, writers, illustrators, inkers and colourists
      • Can be prohibitively expensive
      • Difficult to create genuinely creative stories --> cannot be too formulaic or didactic
    • 27. A work in progress ...
      • Grade 4, 5 and 6 complete
      • Grade 4 under evaluation and broad roll-out
    • 28. Conclusion
      • How to role-model effective thinking practice to ever larger numbers of learners efficiently and effectively?
      • The challenge is to develop attitudes, values and habits that support HOTS
      • Kusasa solution: elearning, humanised by means of illustrated characters and stories
    • 29. Thank you
      • www.kusasa.org
      • www.brightsparks.ws
      • www.shuttleworthfoundation.org

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