Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape

609

Published on

Published in: Technology, Business
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
609
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
11
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. A Critical Discourse Analysis of the ICT Strategies of the Center for Innovation, Provincial Government of the Western Cape Steve Vosloo University of Cape Town South AfricaSession 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 2. Motivation, problem area Enter ICTs → tools to support development (ICT4D) • Recurrent themes: – Uncriticality (not enough research) – Causality between ICTs and development (without evidence) – Disconnect between discourse (ICT4D) and implementation (failure) – Technological determinism (access = development) – “Leapfrog”Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 3. Motivation, problem area “governmental, political and technological attempts that focus almost exclusively on providing access to digital communication technologies … expect development naturally to flow from that” (Roode et al., 2004)Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 4. Motivation, problem area • SA in support of ICT4D, information society, knowledge economy, e.g. National e-Strategy (2007) and provincial strategies, policies, frameworks, etc. • This discourse of ICT4D is very important • “Technocentric approach” (technological determinism) shown to be the cause of many ICT4D failures • ICT4D policies need to be exposed to critical discourse analysisSession 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 5. Motivation, problem area CDA is based on “assumptions of disharmony, conflict, and power differentials between populations and groups, and on the assumption that language use reflects, reproduces, and changes these social phenomena” (Frantz, 2003)Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 6. Research Objectives • Considering key ICT strategic documents, were there invalid claims or “distortions” in the texts? • If yes, what were these distortions? • Remember: Distortions decrease the chance of successful implementationSession 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 7. Research approach, Methodology • Applied to: – 5 strategic documents of the Centre for e-Innovation, PGWC: background, framework, strategy and planning – CeI driving e-govt and information society in the WC, becoming a “change agent” to achieve developmental goals through ICTs – Documents published April 2004 to January 2006 • Habermas Theory of Communicative Action (1984) reveals underlying assumptions and ideologies in texts • Expose distortions, but also help undistort • Communication in an “ideal speech situation” meets four validity claimsSession 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 8. Research approach, Methodology Claim Question If valid If invalid Truth Is the discourse Knowledge Misrepresentation true? Clarity Is the discourse Comprehension Confusion clear or does it use jargon that is not understood? Sincerity Is there a hidden Trust False assurances agenda in the discourse? Legitimacy What is Consent Illegitimacy assumed in the discourse?Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 9. Research approach, Methodology • Operationalised by Cukier et al. (2004, 2003) • Guiding questions by Cukier et al. (2004, 2003) and Stahl et al. (2005) • 97 pages to analyse • Needed second pass through analysis to regroup/redefine claimsSession 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 10. Major Outcomes/Results Truth: Argumentation and evidence • What is said about the technology? • Are the issues and options clearly defined? • What costs (financial and claimed negative effects) and benefits (claimed positive effects) have been identified and assessed? • What evidence has been provided to support these arguments? • Has the relevant information been communicated without distortion or omission? • Are there ideological claims which are unexamined?Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 11. Major Outcomes/Results Truth Level 2 (Truth) No. of claims Description 250 Benefit 231 Disadvantage 3 Evidence 10 Distortion 29 Omission 13 Faulty analogy/logic/cause 5 Problem 84 Ideology 15 Total 640Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 12. Major Outcomes/Results Sincerity: Metaphors and descriptors • Are metaphors used, e.g. ICT revolution? • Do metaphors and connotative words promote or suppress understanding? • Do metaphors and connotative words create false assurances? • Positive associations: new, innovative, pioneering • Negative associations: expensive, insufficientSession 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 13. Major Outcomes/Results Sincerity • ICT as “enabler” (28 times) • ICT plays a “critical role” (42 times) • “Participation” (5 times) “[T]he ICT revolution can provide powerful new tools both for addressing peoples basic needs and for enriching the lives of poor people and communities in unprecedented ways” [AR1]Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 14. Major Outcomes/Results Clarity • Is there use of jargon? • Are there terms that are not explained? • Is there evidence of obfuscation? • Difficult standard to apply (Cukier et al., 2003) • Fallacy of jargon (Michalos, 1986) occurs when a claim is made through technical or uncommon terms that make it seem more important or valuable than what it is, e.g. “The Centre for e- Innovation has the digital ecosystem of the entire Province as its concern” [AR1]Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 15. Major Outcomes/Results Legitimacy: How is it achieved? In whose interests? • Who is speaking, who is silent, what are their interests? “Selective silence” (Cukier et al., 2004) • What is privileged? What is not said about the technology? • What is assumed or implied? • How are the decisions legitimised? • Who is cited, who is not?Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 16. Major Outcomes/Results Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 No. of claims Total Legitimacy Assumption (General) 3 54 ICTs have inherent value 1 Technological determinism 30 Techno-optimism 20 Legitimation Government developmental 11 53 strategies Other means of legitimation 24 Other PGWC documents 18 Non-speaker 8 8 Speaker 7 7Session 4b, Total 2010 19 May IST-Africa 2010 122
  • 17. Major Outcomes/Results Legitimacy • Example of technological determinism: “The digital world is a world united by one language of ones and zeros; a world where people across continents (or across the passageway) share information with one another and work together to build ideas and projects. Through collaboration, more voluminous and accurate information is generated and accumulated, and distributed in a twinkling to an audience that understands exactly what was said. This in turn allows the recipients of the information to use it for their own purposes, to create new ideas and redistribute them. The result is progress.” [AR1]Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 18. Major Outcomes/Results Legitimacy • Example of techno-optimism: “production in the knowledge economy can be fine-tuned in ways heretofore undreamed of” [AR1]Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 19. Discussion • Inherited distortions: – Global → national → provincial → local – ICTs have served sustainable development → WSIS/MDGs → ASGiSA – CeI forced to promulgate these distortions • CeI itself: – Battle for budget allocation – Self-justification – The “sell” is sometimes necessary (but could be more balanced) • Also undistorted claims: – Holistic view: relevant content, training and partnerships – ICTs alone cannot solve all problemsSession 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 20. Conclusion and outlook • Balanced viewpoints (minority) • Yes, distortions (majority) • Need more balance • Ask questions: – Do ICTs serve developmental needs? Not How do ICTs serve ...? – Real costs of ICTs? – ROI? • A “critical perspective may reduce the chances of technology being oversold, and thereby, ironically, enhance its diffusion” (Cukier et al., 2003)Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 21. Questions • Has anything changed since 2006? • Have policies and strategies matured? • Swapping old distortions for new ones? • What is todays “leapfrogging”? • Watch Kentaro Toyamas talk at TEDx Tokyo on the "myth of scale" http://is.gd/ccEWbSession 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010
  • 22. Credits Steve Vosloo: stevevosloo@gmail.com Dr Wallace Chigona: wallace.chigona@uct.ac.za Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 3.0Session 4b, 19 May 2010 IST-Africa 2010

×