0
Effective Delegation
a.k.a., Managing
Monkeys at Work
Presented by:
Steve Urquhart
It’s a jungle
out there!
Can you relate to this?
How is it possible that I
am working overtime and
still running out of
time, every day, while it
s...
If any of these are true …
 You’ve changed your LinkedIn job
description to Firefighter because you
spend your day in ―ma...
Do you ever find
yourself asking …
Who’s actually
in charge
around this
place?
Are you controlling events …
… or are events controlling
you?
No matter how much I do …
 Why is it that I’ve increased my
efficiency, but now I have more to do?
 Wherever I go, hallw...
Who’s got the monkey?
William Oncken, Jr.
… the tale of an
overburdened manager
who allows his employees
to delegate upwar...
What is a monkey?
 Monkeys are issues/actions that
people bring to you to solve.
 The ―monkey on your back‖ metaphor
des...
Be on the lookout for
monkeys!
Upward-leaping monkeys!
(a.k.a., Upward Delegation)
From a subordinate or team member
to their boss, project
manager, prog...
Can you think of a
situation where
someone has “upward
delegated” to you?
Upward-leaping monkeys …
Downward-leaping monkeys!
From a higher-level
manager, i.e., your boss …
Sideways-leaping monkeys!
Shifting peer-to-peer
Six rules for managing
monkeys
1. Monkeys should be fed or shot
2. Every monkey should have an
assigned feeding time and a...
―Case Study‖
WHAT DO YOU
NEED, NEW GUY? I’M
BUSY …
MEET “NEW GUY” …
HE JUST STARTED HERE
… AND HIS BOSS, THE
PROGRAM MANAG...
―Case Study‖
I’M HAVING PROBLEMS
WITH THIS SPEC, CAN
YOU TAKE A LOOK AT
IT?
KINDA BUSY RIGHT
NOW, LET ME GET
BACK TO YOU
L...
―Case Study‖
HEY, HAVE YOU HAD A
CHANCE TO LOOK
OVER THAT SPEC YET?
UM, NO. I’LL REVIEW
IT THIS WEEKEND
AND GET BACK TO
YO...
―Case Study‖
WHAT’S THE STATUS OF
THAT SPEC I GAVE YOU
TO LOOK AT LAST
WEEK?
MONDAY MORNING, ABOUT 11:00 AM
KINDA BUSY RIG...
New mantra:
At no time while I am helping you will your
problem become my problem. The instant
your problem becomes mine, ...
Monkeys should be fed or
shot
 No one likes a starving monkey. They
tend to be very disagreeable and
squeal and raise a r...
Every monkey should have an
assigned feeding time …
 After a feeding session, the manager
should select an appropriate ti...
… and a degree of initiative
5. Act on their own; routine reporting
4. Act, but advise at once
3. Recommend, then take res...
The monkey population should
be kept ―manage-able‖ …
 It should take 15 minutes (or less) to
feed a monkey
 Managers sho...
Monkeys should be fed by
appointment only
 Allowing employees to bring problems
to you on their timetable increases the
c...
Monkey feeding appointments
may be rescheduled …
 Either party, the manager or the team
member (subordinate), may
resched...
Monkeys shall be fed face to
face …
 Holding feeding sessions via e-mail or
memo transfers the monkey to the
manager.
 A...
Rules that apply for all
monkeys
1. Define the monkey: It must be fully
described. That is, the next move must be
known.
2...
Here’s proof: ―Real‖ monkeys
can help get the job done, too!
Some typical reasons not to
delegate? (a.k.a., excuses)
 "Delegating would mean giving up
power and control."
 "Delegati...
The Four Cs of getting
comfortable with delegating
 Confidence. Be convinced that this person
can do it. If not, use insu...
Delegation vs. abdication …
There are a few things that you should
not delegate:
 Performance feedback
 Disciplinary act...
In Brief: Oncken’s Rules of
Monkey Management
1. Descriptions: The next moves are
specified. (this is sooooo
important!!!)...
Does it pass the ―Worth-
Your-Time‖ Test?
1. Am I the right person?
2. Is this the right time?
3. Do I have enough informa...
THANK YOU!
@workforce101
/in/steveurquhart
steveurquhart@gmail.com
The Allegory of
the Five
Monkeys
“Bonus Session”
Presented by:
Steve Urquhart
Orange County Clerk of Courts
It’s a jungle
...
Once there was a cage containing five monkeys.
Inside the cage, hung a banana on a string with a set of stairs under it.
T...
Before long, one of the monkeys would attempt to climb the stairs towards
the bananas.
The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
As soon as he touches the stairs, all of the monkeys are sprayed with cold
water. After a while, another monkey makes an a...
Having learned their lesson, the cold water is put away. One monkey is
removed from the cage and replace it with a new one...
To his surprise and horror, all of the other monkeys attack him. After another
attempt and attack, he knows that if he tri...
The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
Next, remove another of the original five monkeys and replace it with a new
one. The newc...
The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
Every time the newest monkey takes to the stairs, he is attacked. Most of
the monkeys tha...
The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
After replacing all of the original monkeys, none of the remaining monkeys
have ever been...
The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
Because
we’ve
always done
it that way
The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
THANK YOU!
@workforce101
/in/steveurquhart
steveurquhart@gmail.com
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UCF Effective Delegation Monkeys at Work 04 28 2014

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Transcript of "UCF Effective Delegation Monkeys at Work 04 28 2014"

  1. 1. Effective Delegation a.k.a., Managing Monkeys at Work Presented by: Steve Urquhart It’s a jungle out there!
  2. 2. Can you relate to this? How is it possible that I am working overtime and still running out of time, every day, while it seems like everyone else goes home right on time as if they don’t have enough to do? ?
  3. 3. If any of these are true …  You’ve changed your LinkedIn job description to Firefighter because you spend your day in ―management by crisis‖ mode.  At the end of the work day, you’ve crossed nothing off on your To-Do list but you’ve hardly had a minute to spare.  Your smartphone has to be surgically removed from your hand.  You find yourself heading straight for the produce section of your local supermarket because of a craving for bananas! You might have a monkey problem!
  4. 4. Do you ever find yourself asking … Who’s actually in charge around this place?
  5. 5. Are you controlling events … … or are events controlling you?
  6. 6. No matter how much I do …  Why is it that I’ve increased my efficiency, but now I have more to do?  Wherever I go, hallway, elevator, parking lot … even the restroom … my team needs something from me!  I’m working overtime on things my team needs from me before they can proceed with their assigned tasks … You need to be asking yourself
  7. 7. Who’s got the monkey? William Oncken, Jr. … the tale of an overburdened manager who allows his employees to delegate upward. http://bit.ly/whosgotthemonkey
  8. 8. What is a monkey?  Monkeys are issues/actions that people bring to you to solve.  The ―monkey on your back‖ metaphor describes issues, and the ownership of issues.  Issues may be problems, tasks or other items at work that you need to resolve.  They can come from just about anywhere, without warning … and you
  9. 9. Be on the lookout for monkeys!
  10. 10. Upward-leaping monkeys! (a.k.a., Upward Delegation) From a subordinate or team member to their boss, project manager, program manager, etc. Monkeys can leap when you meet your team members in person, talk to them on the phone, or (especially!!!) when you receive e-mail from them.
  11. 11. Can you think of a situation where someone has “upward delegated” to you? Upward-leaping monkeys …
  12. 12. Downward-leaping monkeys! From a higher-level manager, i.e., your boss …
  13. 13. Sideways-leaping monkeys! Shifting peer-to-peer
  14. 14. Six rules for managing monkeys 1. Monkeys should be fed or shot 2. Every monkey should have an assigned feeding time and a degree of initiative 3. The monkey population should be kept ―manage-able‖ … 4. Monkeys should be fed by appointment only 5. Monkey feeding appointments may be rescheduled … 6. Monkeys shall be fed face to face …
  15. 15. ―Case Study‖ WHAT DO YOU NEED, NEW GUY? I’M BUSY … MEET “NEW GUY” … HE JUST STARTED HERE … AND HIS BOSS, THE PROGRAM MANAGER BOSS ?
  16. 16. ―Case Study‖ I’M HAVING PROBLEMS WITH THIS SPEC, CAN YOU TAKE A LOOK AT IT? KINDA BUSY RIGHT NOW, LET ME GET BACK TO YOU LATER THURSDAY AFTERNOON, ABOUT 5:45 PM
  17. 17. ―Case Study‖ HEY, HAVE YOU HAD A CHANCE TO LOOK OVER THAT SPEC YET? UM, NO. I’LL REVIEW IT THIS WEEKEND AND GET BACK TO YOU FRIDAY MORNING, ABOUT 9:30 AM
  18. 18. ―Case Study‖ WHAT’S THE STATUS OF THAT SPEC I GAVE YOU TO LOOK AT LAST WEEK? MONDAY MORNING, ABOUT 11:00 AM KINDA BUSY RIGHT NOW, LET ME GET
  19. 19. New mantra: At no time while I am helping you will your problem become my problem. The instant your problem becomes mine, you will no longer have a problem. I cannot help someone who hasn't got a problem.
  20. 20. Monkeys should be fed or shot  No one likes a starving monkey. They tend to be very disagreeable and squeal and raise a ruckus. Monkeys must be fed periodically.  The problem (the monkey) must be dealt with between the manager and the employee with the problem on a regular basis. If the monkey can be shot (the problem solved quickly), then feeding times are not necessary.
  21. 21. Every monkey should have an assigned feeding time …  After a feeding session, the manager should select an appropriate time for the next feeding and should have a number of action steps for the employee to take.
  22. 22. … and a degree of initiative 5. Act on their own; routine reporting 4. Act, but advise at once 3. Recommend, then take resulting action 2. Ask what to do 1. Wait until told Levels 1 and 2 are the biggest sources of monkeys!
  23. 23. The monkey population should be kept ―manage-able‖ …  It should take 15 minutes (or less) to feed a monkey  Managers should keep the list of problems that are in various stages of solution at a manageable number.
  24. 24. Monkeys should be fed by appointment only  Allowing employees to bring problems to you on their timetable increases the chances that the monkey will move from the employee to the manager.  By setting specific times for addressing the problem, managers empower employees to make interim decisions about the problem, and still report back.
  25. 25. Monkey feeding appointments may be rescheduled …  Either party, the manager or the team member (subordinate), may reschedule a feeding appointment for any reason, but it must be scheduled to a specific time to avoid losing track of the monkey.
  26. 26. Monkeys shall be fed face to face …  Holding feeding sessions via e-mail or memo transfers the monkey to the manager.  An employee can ―pass the monkey‖ to the manager by simply requesting a response.  Feedings that take place in person or on the phone require the monkey to remain with the employee unless the manager takes an affirmative step to take it. (or by telephone, but not in writing)
  27. 27. Rules that apply for all monkeys 1. Define the monkey: It must be fully described. That is, the next move must be known. 2. Assign the monkey: It must be fully owned. Whose monkey is it? 3. “Insure” the monkey: It must be insured, based on risk. What if you give an important project to someone who is not ready? How can you balance the personal growth of your people with acceptable risk to your own reputation and career. 4. Put the monkey on a schedule: It must be placed on a care and feeding schedule. When, where, and how do you follow up?
  28. 28. Here’s proof: ―Real‖ monkeys can help get the job done, too!
  29. 29. Some typical reasons not to delegate? (a.k.a., excuses)  "Delegating would mean giving up power and control."  "Delegating makes me nonessential."  "Delegating is not worth the time -- I can do the job myself faster and better."  "I can't count on my team to handle this."
  30. 30. The Four Cs of getting comfortable with delegating  Confidence. Be convinced that this person can do it. If not, use insurance policy: recommend, then act; or work with them not for them.  Clarify expectations and be reasonably sure your team members know what is to be done. Verify understanding by having them  Be Certain the person has sufficient resources-- time, information, money, people, assistance, and authority--to do the work.  Don’t turn over Control until your are confident that the cost and timing and quantity and quality of the project will be acceptable. Have them get back to you with
  31. 31. Delegation vs. abdication … There are a few things that you should not delegate:  Performance feedback  Disciplinary actions  Politically sensitive tasks  Confrontations arising from interpersonal conflict
  32. 32. In Brief: Oncken’s Rules of Monkey Management 1. Descriptions: The next moves are specified. (this is sooooo important!!!) 2. Owners: The monkey is assigned to a person. (and that is agreed upon) 3. Insurance: The risk is covered. 4. Care & Feeding: The time and place for check-up/follow-up is specified.
  33. 33. Does it pass the ―Worth- Your-Time‖ Test? 1. Am I the right person? 2. Is this the right time? 3. Do I have enough information? ―(Even) if your boss asks you to do something and their request fails the test, it’s not just okay—it’s useful—to push back or redirect so the work is completed productively. It’s not helpful to you, your boss, or your organization if you waste your time on the wrong work.‖ – Peter Bregman in Harvard Business Review collection: Guide to
  34. 34. THANK YOU! @workforce101 /in/steveurquhart steveurquhart@gmail.com
  35. 35. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys “Bonus Session” Presented by: Steve Urquhart Orange County Clerk of Courts It’s a jungle out there!
  36. 36. Once there was a cage containing five monkeys. Inside the cage, hung a banana on a string with a set of stairs under it. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
  37. 37. Before long, one of the monkeys would attempt to climb the stairs towards the bananas. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
  38. 38. As soon as he touches the stairs, all of the monkeys are sprayed with cold water. After a while, another monkey makes an attempt with the same result. All the monkeys are sprayed with cold water. Pretty soon, none of the monkeys will try to climb the stairs. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
  39. 39. Having learned their lesson, the cold water is put away. One monkey is removed from the cage and replace it with a new one. The new monkey sees the banana and wants to climb the stairs. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
  40. 40. To his surprise and horror, all of the other monkeys attack him. After another attempt and attack, he knows that if he tries to climb the stairs, he will be assaulted. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
  41. 41. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys Next, remove another of the original five monkeys and replace it with a new one. The newcomer goes to the stairs and is attacked. The previous newcomer takes part in the punishment with enthusiasm. Likewise, replace a third original monkey with a new one, then a fourth, then a fifth.
  42. 42. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys Every time the newest monkey takes to the stairs, he is attacked. Most of the monkeys that are beating him have no idea why they were not permitted to climb the stairs or why they are participating in the beating of the newest monkey.
  43. 43. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys After replacing all of the original monkeys, none of the remaining monkeys have ever been sprayed with cold water. Nevertheless, no monkey ever again approaches the stairs to try for the banana. Why not? Because as far as they know, that's the way it's always been done. It becomes clear that socialization (and organizational culture) can shape our thoughts, influence our behaviors and demand our compliance.
  44. 44. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys Because we’ve always done it that way
  45. 45. The Allegory of the Five Monkeys
  46. 46. THANK YOU! @workforce101 /in/steveurquhart steveurquhart@gmail.com
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