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GISG 113 Advanced GIS Final Project Presentation
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GISG 113 Advanced GIS Final Project Presentation

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This is the final presentation I gave in my GISG 113 Advanced GIS class regarding animation of maps

This is the final presentation I gave in my GISG 113 Advanced GIS class regarding animation of maps

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  • Some of the data sources used for this project include SANDAG and the SANDAG Data Warehouse, a free public service of the San Diego Association of Governments. Additional map data was provided by SANGIS, San Diego Geographic Information Services.
  • Stop the slide show now (there are no more slides) and double click the file ending in .avi – once you have discussed that file and its quality then start the next file ending in .mov. This is the end of the powerpoint portion of the presentation.

GISG 113 Advanced GIS Final Project Presentation GISG 113 Advanced GIS Final Project Presentation Presentation Transcript

  • San Diego Population Study 2000-2030 Steve Ruge & Lorraine Ahlquist GISG 113 Final Project Tuesday, January 26, 2010 © flickr.com/AnnPatt. Used with Permission.
  • Data Sources
    • SANDAG Data Warehouse and SANDAG GIS Layer Files
      • San Diego Association of Governments (sandag.org)
    • San Diego GIS Layer Files
      • SanGIS – San Diego Geographic Information Services (sangis.com)
    • Summary/Clarifying Information
      • US Census Bureau (census.gov)
  • Area of Study
  •  
  • Analysis
  • 2000 US Census Bureau Top 5 Most Populated Census Tracts 9,198 Torrey Highlalands/ Rancho Pe ñ asquitos/Del Mar Mesa 83.38 9,242 Carmel Mountain Ranch 170.38 9,261 Rancho Bernardo 171.05 9,477 Southeast Encanto Neighborhoods 33.02 10,013 Tierrasanta 95.08 Population Neighborhood Census Tract
  • 2010 SANDAG Projection Top 5 Most Populated Census Tracts 12,281 Rancho Bernardo 170.32 12,375 Torrey Hills/ Del Mar Mesa/ Carmel Valley 83.33 14,396 Miramar 94.00 16,587 Rancho Bernardo 171.05 22,326 Otay Mesa 100.14 Population Neighborhood Census Tract
  • 2020 SANDAG Projection Top 5 Most Populated Census Tracts 16,827 Rancho Bernardo 170.32 17,686 Rancho Bernardo 171.05 19,190 Otay Mesa/San Ysidro 100.15 22,722 Black Mountain Ranch/ Rancho Bernardo 170.30 31,256 Otay Mesa 100.14 Population Neighborhood Census Tract
  • 2030 SANDAG Projection Top 5 Most Populated Census Tracts 19,872 Centre City 52.00 20,118 Rancho Bernardo 171.05 21,691 Otay Mesa/San Ysidro 100.15 32,216 Otay Mesa 100.14 36,339 Black Mountain Ranch/ Rancho Bernardo 170.30 Population Neighborhood Census Tract
  • 2000 US Census Bureau Hispanic Top 5 Most Populated Census Tracts 4,487 Southeastern San Diego 49.00 4,551 Encanto 33.02 5,024 San Ysidro/ Tijuana River Valley 100.09 5,311 San Ysidro 100.13 6,603 San Ysidro 100.05 Population Neighborhood Census Tract
  • 2010 SANDAG Projection Hispanic Top 5 Most Populated Census Tracts 5,181 Centre City/Barrio Logan 51.00 5,431 San Ysidro 100.13 5,666 San Ysidro/ Tijuana River Valley 100.09 7,240 San Ysidro 100.05 10,292 Otay Mesa 100.14 Population Neighborhood Census Tract
  • 2020 SANDAG Projection Hispanic Top 5 Most Populated Census Tracts 6,896 San Ysidro 100.13 7,120 Centre City 58.00 7,835 San Ysidro 100.05 15,324 Otay Mesa 100.14 18,901 Otay Mesa/San Ysidro 100.15 Population Neighborhood Census Tract
  • 2030 SANDAG Projection Hispanic Top 5 Most Populated Census Tracts 7,758 San Ysidro 100.13 8,312 San Ysidro 100.05 11,613 Centre City/Barrio Logan 51.00 16,679 Otay Mesa 100.14 21,526 Otay Mesa/San Ysidro 100.15 Population Neighborhood Census Tract
  • Problems and Pitfalls
  • No Live Demonstration
    • We were not able to show the steps involved in creating an animation live tonight since the labs on campus only have ArcMap 9.1 while ArcMap 9.2 is required to perform animations within ArcMap.
  • Animation Difficulties
    • Data had to be extensively edited to insert the necessary time fields to perform the animation which was a time-consuming task.
    • Population data had so many classification levels that changes were barely noticeable in the animated maps. For the 30 year period we were studying, reducing the classification levels would have shown no noticeable changes in the animation, while increasing the level helped but made creating a legend difficult.
    • Census tract boundaries do not conform exactly to the corporate limits of the city.
  • ArcCatalog Merge Tool
    • Data from the SANDAG Data Warehouse was served by year in separate data files. Before we could begin, we needed to merge several of the data files together to make one complete file to animate from.
  • Conclusions
    • In General, population will continue to grow both at the extreme northwestern and souther/southwestern city limits with large spikes in Tierrasanta and Otay Mesa
    • Hispanic populations seem to be staying in Southern areas of the city with some migration to the city center (San Ysidro/Otay Mesa/Centre City)
    • Areas such as Rancho Bernardo, Torrey Hills, San Ysidro, and Otay Mesa can expect to see population growth through 2030
  • “ How To” Step by Step recreation of how we created the animations
  • Time-Based Animation General Population Trends
  • Step 1: Turn On Toolbar
    • Turn on the Animation toolbar by Choosing View > Toolbars > Animation
  • Animation Toolbar
    • This is the animation toolbar where all animation tasks are performed
  • 2: Select Create Keyframe…
    • The first “real” step in animating is to choose the Create Keyframe… menu option from the Animation pull-down menu
  • 3: Creating the Animation Key Frame
    • Click the Type drop-down list and choose Time Layer as the type of track you will be creating to store keyframes.
    • Click the Source object drop down and select the layer you are animating
    • Click New to create a new time-layer track with the default name.
  • 4: Create Destination Track
    • Type “Start Time” for the name of the first keyframe.
    • Click Create once . Be careful to only click once. If you click more than once you will have to close the dialog box, click Animation, and click Clear Animation and start all over from step 1.
    • Type “End Time” for the name of the second keyframe and click create, then click Close.
  • 5: Start the Animation Manager
    • Click the animation drop-down arrow and click Animation Manager
  • 6: Naming Your Time Track
    • Click the value set for the name of the track (Time Layer track 1) and rename it to something useful for you (I chose San Diego Population Change for my reference.)
  • 7: Selecting Your Time Track
    • Select your track by clicking at the beginning of it and then click Properties…
  • A note about Time Track Properties
    • The layer to which a track is attached can have one time field or a start time field and an end time field. It is useful to have an end time field in cases where the time stamps are irregularly spaced so that there will always be a time stamp displayed as the animation is played.
  • 8a: Time Track Properties – Start Time
    • Click the Time Track Properties tab
    • Click the Start Time Field drop-down arrow and choose the name of the field that contains your starting date (in my animations it is START_DATE as shown to the right)
    • Since I formatted START_DATE as a date formatted field the Format drop-down list is disabled. If it had been a string or double field, you would have to indicate the field format here.
  • 8b: Time Track Properties – End Time
    • Click the End Time Field drop-down arrow and choose the name of the field that contains your ending date (in my animations it is END_DATE as shown to the right)
    • Since I formatted END_DATE as a date formatted field the Format drop-down list is disabled. If it had been a string or double field, you would have to indicate the field format here.
    • Click Calculate Times
  • More about Calculate Times
    • Calculate Times finds the minimum and maximum values in the Start Time Field specified and populates these as the time values for the two keyframes you created.
    • The Start Time keyframe I created will now have a time value of January 1, 2000. The End Time keyframe will now have a value of January 1, 2030. You can see these values set on the Keyframes tab of the Animation Manager later.
  • 9: Displaying Times of Time Slices on Display as Animation Plays
    • Ensure Show time in the display is checked and Show track name in the display is unchecked, since there is only one track in this animation.
    • Click OK.
  • 10: Modifying Keyframe Properties
    • Click the Keyframes tab and see that the time values have been populated for each keyframe in the Time column. Since my data was in ten year intervals I had to set the interval for each keyframe to 10 and the units to years.
    • Click the value for the interval of the Start Time keyframe and type “10”, then repeat this for the End Time keyframe.
    • Click the value for the units of the Start Time keyframe and click Years from the dropdown list. Repeat for the End Time keyframe.
  • 11: Preview Time Slices
    • Click the Time View tab and click in the location shown to view data in the year 2000.
    • The space between each tick mark on the track line represents each 10 year period. After the second tick mark, the time slice displayed will change from 2000 to 2010.
  • 12a: Editing Time Text
    • Click the Select Elements tool on the Tools toolbar.
    • Double-click the time text in the display.
    • Click Change Symbol on the Text tab of the Animation Time Display Properties box.
  • 12b: Editing Time Text
    • Click the Size drop down arrow and click 24.
    • Choose bold for the style.
    • Click OK, then click OK on the Time display dialog box
    • Click the text in the display and move it to a location where it can be seen more clearly, then click away from the text to remove the blue dashed outline.
  • 13: Checking Restore State
    • Ensure that Restore state after preview is unchecked so the currently displayed time slice and symbology and positioin of the time text will be retained in the display after the Animation Manager is closed.
    • Click Close.
  • 14: Playing the Animation
    • Click the Open Animation Controls button on the Animation Toolbar.
    • Click Options.
  • Playing the Animation (cont’d)
    • Click By number of frames and click Calculate.
    • Set the Frame Duration to 1.0 if not already set to this value.
    • Uncheck Restore state after playing.
    • Click Options to hide the play and record options so you can see the animation in the display.
    • Click the play button.
  • 15: Exporting the Animation
    • Click the Animation drop-down arrow and click Export to Video
  • Exporting the Animation (cont’d)
    • Navigate to the folder where you wish to store your animation file and enter a filename
    • If you have licensed Quicktime you can choose Quicktime (.mov) here, otherwise leave the Save as type as AVI (.avi). Choosing Quicktime without a license will result in a failure at the last step to export.
    • A Quicktime license is $29 and well worth the money – the videos made with it were 100x better than the .avi videos I first made. (Quicktime dialog at lower right.)
    • Click Export.
  • Exporting the Animation (cont’d)
    • If you chose .avi you should see the Video Compression dialog to the left. Click OK to start the export and make sure your mouse pointer stays out of the main window.
    • If you chose .mov (Quicktime) you should see the box in the lower left. I recommend setting the Compression Type to Animation and leaving the other settings “as is.” Click OK to begin the export and make sure the mouse pointer stays out of the main window.
  • Time-based and Graph Animation Hispanic Populations in San Diego
  • 1: Open the Create Graph Wizard
    • Click on the Tools menu, select Graphs, and then choose Create…
  • 2a: Graph Wizard Page 1 Settings
    • Click the Graph type drop-down arrow on the wizard and click Vertical Bar.
    • Click the Layer/Table drop down arrow and click Hispanic Pop By CT
    • Click the Value field drop-down list and click H_TOTAL_PO to set this as the value for the y-axis.
  • 2b: Graph Wizard Page 1 Settings (cont’d)
    • Click the Value field drop-down list and click H_TOTAL_PO to set this as the value for the x-axis.
    • Set Ascending for the X field so that the census tracts will be displayed in numerical order.
    • Set the X label field to ID.
    • Uncheck Add to legend so the legend is not displayed in the graph.
    • Click Next.
  • 3: Graph Wizard Page 2 Settings
    • In the General graph properties frame, type “Hispanic Population by Census Tract Example” in the Title text box.
    • Type “Census Tract” in the Title text box on the Bottom Tab
    • Click the Left tab and enter “Total Hispanic Population” for the Title for the Y Axis.
    • Click Finish.
  • 4: Graph Creation
    • Your finished graph is displayed.
    • As long as this graph is opened with the animation you created earlier it should animate along with your animation.
    • Export this finished graph the same way you would any animation (like the previous one we just did).
  • Demonstration of Animation Results
    • The presentation will conclude at this time so that we can play the appropriate media files (AVI and Quicktime) of the animations we produced.