Virtuals worlds and radical pedagogy

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Presentation that was given at the ESRC: Social learning in Virtual worlds seminar at City University, London on 14th March 2008.

Presentation that was given at the ESRC: Social learning in Virtual worlds seminar at City University, London on 14th March 2008.

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  • 1. Title slide
    • ESRC seminar: social learning in virtual worlds City University, London
    • 14th March 2008
    • Dr Steven Warburton, King’s College London and Prism(lab) http://www.prism-lab.org
    virtual worlds and radical pedagogy: exploring educational possibilities
  • 2.
    • MUVEnation ( www. muvenation .org ) - EU funded, 2 years
    • LLL3D ( www.lll3d.org ) - EU funded, 2 years
    • (Open)Habitat ( www. openhabitat .org ) – JISC funded, 15 months
    • these projects aim to:
      • examine: good practices; what works and what does not; contexts; development and testing of specific learning scenarios
      • target: different educational sectors; disciplines; specific educational issues e.g. motivation; specific target groups e.g. socially disadvantaged learners
    project areas
  • 3. MUVE affordances
    • Facilitating social interaction (death of distance) , social presence and cooperation
    • Visualisation
    • Contextualisation
    • Relation to doing in the physical world (e.g. designing, building and scripting)
    • Informal learning opportunities e.g. language based communities
    • Affective nature of immersion , empathy and related motivational aspects
    • Simulation and experiential learning
    • Roleplay or taking on ‘new’ roles
    • Strong virtual communities and identity formation (coherence around groups, sub-cultures and geography)
    • Identity play
    • Ownership of learning - opportunities for content production that are both individual and owned
  • 4.  
  • 5. analysing in-world hands on workshops
    • workshop aims: development of specific competencies in building and/or scripting in-world objects
    • average length: one hour
    • organised by non-formal learning providers and offered to the Second Life ‘public’
    • methodology: participatory observation (n=20)
    • followed by: tutor and instructor semi-structured interviews (n=10)
    • assessment: of quality of student learning experience
    • towards: developing a taxonomy of good practices
    • validation: by deploying the taxonomy against a new panel of teachers
  • 6. taxonomy of Second Life practices
  • 7. Mapping control of the environment against pedagogy disorientating stressful, mechanical area of good practice cognitive overload
  • 8. is this the vision we have for education in virtual worlds? why do we strive for poor replications of RL/RW teaching settings?
  • 9. forces us to question context social capital ethics dialogue identity assessment Informal learning collaboration creativity decentreing new digital literacies
  • 10. rethinking teaching approaches for virtual worlds
  • 11. augmentation (life 2.0) or immersion (alternative worlds)
  • 12. where do our bodies go when we are immersed? the disappearing computer
  • 13. Teaching approaches teaching approach immersion augmentation tactical, narrative, strategic culture, context, anonymity, play platform - culture? constraint, control, authenticity platform - tools? extension, flow*, bridges *Csíkszentmihályi (1990)
  • 14. how do we break the monotony of augmentationlist approaches?
  • 15. radical pedagogy as a critical pedagogy for socio-political action, critical consciousness (Freire, Giroux) radical pedagogy as a transformative process, participation in practice (Ascott) radical pedagogy as a discursive space for addressing education and change
  • 16.  
  • 17. Open architecture project http://www.flickr.com/photos/studiowikitecture/sets/72157604038184909/
  • 18. art and design approaches dialogical transformative participation in practice perspectivalism revisability intuition creativity, inventiveness and innovation indeterminacy and improvisation instability and uncertainty interrogative disposition self-construction, self-realisation (Danvers, 2003)
  • 19. towards a radical pedagogy
    • when designing our teaching approaches addressing the dichotomy of augmentation versus immersion provides a valuable filter for reappraising understandings of the possible
    • augmentation approaches question different issues such as platform choice and the affordance of in-world tool sets
    • immersionsist approaches question the richness of the culture and the seamlessness of activity, be it movement or narrative based discursive acts
    • virtual worlds challenge traditional notions of pedagogy and offer new challenges and opportunities and that might be addressed by appropriating the notions of radical pedagogy to provide a discursive space for tackling education and change
  • 20. Final slide Dr Steven Warburton School of Law King's College London Email: steven.warburton@kcl.ac.uk Prism(lab) at http://www.prismlab.org Liquid Learning at http://www.liquidlearning.org Second Life: StevenW Bohm