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Interactive marketing Vlerick M³

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Course at Vlerick School, master in marketing. Based on book, The Conversation Manager.

Course at Vlerick School, master in marketing. Based on book, The Conversation Manager.

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  • “A lot of times, people don’t know what they want until you show it to them…” (Steve Jobs)
  • Recent literature on WOM has largely emphasized these so called influencers. However, others have challenged this idea poning that “word-of-mouth from celebrities, mavens, connectors, alphas, hubs, transmitters, trendsetters, [...] is always good. But it’s no more powerful or influential than word-of-mouth from that guy [...] sitting next to you on the train” (Balter & Butman, 2005). It is therefore our belief that the first step towards a better measurement of WOMO is not looking at “who is doing something”, but at “what everybody is doing.” Therefore, action rather than persons and their characteristics are situated at the heart of our model.When evaluating a viral campaign it is important to map all different communication that consumers have started. The model distinguishes different levels of online actions in relation to the level of engagement they imply (see figure 1) (Womma, 2005).A first type of actions are receiver actions. These happen whenever people receive and absorb the content of a message about brands, products and services. Online surfers can come in contact with information about brands via two types of channels. They can use selective channels like e-mail where they receive information that is personally addressed. However, they can also find information on public sharing platforms like YouTube, online forums,... A second type of actions are sender actions. This encompasses all actions where people share the information about brands with other people. While forwarding as such is indicative for extended reach of an ad (by definition a key performance indicator) it can crystallize in different actions. “Selective forward” actions happen whenever consumers forward the communication to a focussed and/or limited set of people. In turn there are three formats of this kind of forwarding. In “plain forwarding” no comments or much thinking or acting is added from the part of the sender. “Commented forwarding ” means that the forwarder adds negative, positive, reinforcing or other comments. Finally, forwarders can specifically “target” certain people in their peer group (e.g. only send it to brand lovers or acquaintances they know are in a buying process). A second type of sender action are “sharing forward” actions. These consumers like or dislike the ad so much they post it on a open sharing platform such that anyone else interested can be exposed to the ad. The sender is not interested in reaching close acquaintances but reach as many people as possibleA final type of actions are creator actions. These actions basically imply people contributing content to the add (e.g. filling out there or others’ details to personalize the ad), participate in a contest or play an interactive game or even create a new add.In this research, we want to measure to what extent consumers undertake the different types and subtypes of actions: We believe that some WoMo actions will occur more frequently than others. Because receiver actions are passive actions that do not ask a lot of effort from the consumer, we expect this type of action will be the biggest group. Similarly we hypothesize that although sender actions demand more consumer involvement than receiver actions, they will still occur more frequently than creator actions that require a truly active and passionate consumer. Next, we expect that there will be a difference between selective (e-mail) and sharing online communication channels (online forums, blogs, websites specialized in online movies). We hypothesize that consumers will still have a preference for e-mail communication above other types of communication because they are more familiar with the channel (www.E-scape-reports.com)
  • Recent literature on WOM has largely emphasized these so called influencers. However, others have challenged this idea poning that “word-of-mouth from celebrities, mavens, connectors, alphas, hubs, transmitters, trendsetters, [...] is always good. But it’s no more powerful or influential than word-of-mouth from that guy [...] sitting next to you on the train” (Balter & Butman, 2005). It is therefore our belief that the first step towards a better measurement of WOMO is not looking at “who is doing something”, but at “what everybody is doing.” Therefore, action rather than persons and their characteristics are situated at the heart of our model.When evaluating a viral campaign it is important to map all different communication that consumers have started. The model distinguishes different levels of online actions in relation to the level of engagement they imply (see figure 1) (Womma, 2005).A first type of actions are receiver actions. These happen whenever people receive and absorb the content of a message about brands, products and services. Online surfers can come in contact with information about brands via two types of channels. They can use selective channels like e-mail where they receive information that is personally addressed. However, they can also find information on public sharing platforms like YouTube, online forums,... A second type of actions are sender actions. This encompasses all actions where people share the information about brands with other people. While forwarding as such is indicative for extended reach of an ad (by definition a key performance indicator) it can crystallize in different actions. “Selective forward” actions happen whenever consumers forward the communication to a focussed and/or limited set of people. In turn there are three formats of this kind of forwarding. In “plain forwarding” no comments or much thinking or acting is added from the part of the sender. “Commented forwarding ” means that the forwarder adds negative, positive, reinforcing or other comments. Finally, forwarders can specifically “target” certain people in their peer group (e.g. only send it to brand lovers or acquaintances they know are in a buying process). A second type of sender action are “sharing forward” actions. These consumers like or dislike the ad so much they post it on a open sharing platform such that anyone else interested can be exposed to the ad. The sender is not interested in reaching close acquaintances but reach as many people as possibleA final type of actions are creator actions. These actions basically imply people contributing content to the add (e.g. filling out there or others’ details to personalize the ad), participate in a contest or play an interactive game or even create a new add.In this research, we want to measure to what extent consumers undertake the different types and subtypes of actions: We believe that some WoMo actions will occur more frequently than others. Because receiver actions are passive actions that do not ask a lot of effort from the consumer, we expect this type of action will be the biggest group. Similarly we hypothesize that although sender actions demand more consumer involvement than receiver actions, they will still occur more frequently than creator actions that require a truly active and passionate consumer. Next, we expect that there will be a difference between selective (e-mail) and sharing online communication channels (online forums, blogs, websites specialized in online movies). We hypothesize that consumers will still have a preference for e-mail communication above other types of communication because they are more familiar with the channel (www.E-scape-reports.com)
  • Recent literature on WOM has largely emphasized these so called influencers. However, others have challenged this idea poning that “word-of-mouth from celebrities, mavens, connectors, alphas, hubs, transmitters, trendsetters, [...] is always good. But it’s no more powerful or influential than word-of-mouth from that guy [...] sitting next to you on the train” (Balter & Butman, 2005). It is therefore our belief that the first step towards a better measurement of WOMO is not looking at “who is doing something”, but at “what everybody is doing.” Therefore, action rather than persons and their characteristics are situated at the heart of our model.When evaluating a viral campaign it is important to map all different communication that consumers have started. The model distinguishes different levels of online actions in relation to the level of engagement they imply (see figure 1) (Womma, 2005).A first type of actions are receiver actions. These happen whenever people receive and absorb the content of a message about brands, products and services. Online surfers can come in contact with information about brands via two types of channels. They can use selective channels like e-mail where they receive information that is personally addressed. However, they can also find information on public sharing platforms like YouTube, online forums,... A second type of actions are sender actions. This encompasses all actions where people share the information about brands with other people. While forwarding as such is indicative for extended reach of an ad (by definition a key performance indicator) it can crystallize in different actions. “Selective forward” actions happen whenever consumers forward the communication to a focussed and/or limited set of people. In turn there are three formats of this kind of forwarding. In “plain forwarding” no comments or much thinking or acting is added from the part of the sender. “Commented forwarding ” means that the forwarder adds negative, positive, reinforcing or other comments. Finally, forwarders can specifically “target” certain people in their peer group (e.g. only send it to brand lovers or acquaintances they know are in a buying process). A second type of sender action are “sharing forward” actions. These consumers like or dislike the ad so much they post it on a open sharing platform such that anyone else interested can be exposed to the ad. The sender is not interested in reaching close acquaintances but reach as many people as possibleA final type of actions are creator actions. These actions basically imply people contributing content to the add (e.g. filling out there or others’ details to personalize the ad), participate in a contest or play an interactive game or even create a new add.In this research, we want to measure to what extent consumers undertake the different types and subtypes of actions: We believe that some WoMo actions will occur more frequently than others. Because receiver actions are passive actions that do not ask a lot of effort from the consumer, we expect this type of action will be the biggest group. Similarly we hypothesize that although sender actions demand more consumer involvement than receiver actions, they will still occur more frequently than creator actions that require a truly active and passionate consumer. Next, we expect that there will be a difference between selective (e-mail) and sharing online communication channels (online forums, blogs, websites specialized in online movies). We hypothesize that consumers will still have a preference for e-mail communication above other types of communication because they are more familiar with the channel (www.E-scape-reports.com)
  • Recent literature on WOM has largely emphasized these so called influencers. However, others have challenged this idea poning that “word-of-mouth from celebrities, mavens, connectors, alphas, hubs, transmitters, trendsetters, [...] is always good. But it’s no more powerful or influential than word-of-mouth from that guy [...] sitting next to you on the train” (Balter & Butman, 2005). It is therefore our belief that the first step towards a better measurement of WOMO is not looking at “who is doing something”, but at “what everybody is doing.” Therefore, action rather than persons and their characteristics are situated at the heart of our model.When evaluating a viral campaign it is important to map all different communication that consumers have started. The model distinguishes different levels of online actions in relation to the level of engagement they imply (see figure 1) (Womma, 2005).A first type of actions are receiver actions. These happen whenever people receive and absorb the content of a message about brands, products and services. Online surfers can come in contact with information about brands via two types of channels. They can use selective channels like e-mail where they receive information that is personally addressed. However, they can also find information on public sharing platforms like YouTube, online forums,... A second type of actions are sender actions. This encompasses all actions where people share the information about brands with other people. While forwarding as such is indicative for extended reach of an ad (by definition a key performance indicator) it can crystallize in different actions. “Selective forward” actions happen whenever consumers forward the communication to a focussed and/or limited set of people. In turn there are three formats of this kind of forwarding. In “plain forwarding” no comments or much thinking or acting is added from the part of the sender. “Commented forwarding ” means that the forwarder adds negative, positive, reinforcing or other comments. Finally, forwarders can specifically “target” certain people in their peer group (e.g. only send it to brand lovers or acquaintances they know are in a buying process). A second type of sender action are “sharing forward” actions. These consumers like or dislike the ad so much they post it on a open sharing platform such that anyone else interested can be exposed to the ad. The sender is not interested in reaching close acquaintances but reach as many people as possibleA final type of actions are creator actions. These actions basically imply people contributing content to the add (e.g. filling out there or others’ details to personalize the ad), participate in a contest or play an interactive game or even create a new add.In this research, we want to measure to what extent consumers undertake the different types and subtypes of actions: We believe that some WoMo actions will occur more frequently than others. Because receiver actions are passive actions that do not ask a lot of effort from the consumer, we expect this type of action will be the biggest group. Similarly we hypothesize that although sender actions demand more consumer involvement than receiver actions, they will still occur more frequently than creator actions that require a truly active and passionate consumer. Next, we expect that there will be a difference between selective (e-mail) and sharing online communication channels (online forums, blogs, websites specialized in online movies). We hypothesize that consumers will still have a preference for e-mail communication above other types of communication because they are more familiar with the channel (www.E-scape-reports.com)
  • Leading Chinese e-tailerDangDang.com gives back toits customers—and encourages their vigilant attention tothe site—by randomly assigning one hour a day as“Lucky Time” in which all purchases made within thathour are free of charge. (Tip of the hat to PSFK.com.)

Interactive marketing Vlerick M³ Interactive marketing Vlerick M³ Presentation Transcript

  • Interactive Marketing
  • Our next 4 days
    Goal:
    Overview of the basics and latest new stuff
    Understand new & relevant consumer trends
    Integration of social media in marketing mix
  • Day 1: Setting the scene
    Conversation Management
    Trends in consumer behavior
    Conversation management philosophy
    Brand identification
    Activation
    Manage the Conversation
    Case introduction: Conv. Mgm. Plan for Vlerick
  • Day 2: Get the basics right
    Direct marketing
    Erik Van Vooren
    Stories from a successful start-up: the insiders
    Bjorn Cassiers
    The best website in the world
    Bart De Waele (@Netlash)
  • Day 3: Interactive brand activation
    Best online advertising in the world
    Erwin Jansen (@ErwinJansen)
    Stories from the first Conv Mgr in Belgium
    Dirk De Wulf, Rabobank (@__XIII__)
    From conversation to conversion
    Clo Willaerts (@bnox)
  • Day 4: the future
    What’s the story about mobile?
    Dado Van Peteghem (@Dadovanpeteghem)
    Superstar companies
    Steven (@Steven_InSites)
    Showtime
    Starring? You!
  • “This is the new conventional wisdom. Use it or lose!”
    Seth Godin
    author Purple cow
    @Steven_InSites
    The Conversation Manager
    by Steven Van Belleghem
    #CM48
  • Word of mouth
  • Word of mouth
    B.G.
  • WorLd of mouth
    A.G.
  • Speed INCREASES
  • One week info from the NYT
    >
    a lifetime of info in the 18th Century
  • Speed
  • Speed
    15months
    9months
    100.000.000
    200.000.000
    600.000.000
  • Speed
    9 months
    3 months
    7u/m
    13u/m
    24u/m
  • Speed
    26%
  • Speed
    2x
  • Real time feedback
  • Consequence of ‘WorLd of Mouth’?
    What’s happening with the consumer?
  • We believetoday’sconsumers ...
    are post-modernnomads
    Consumers switch between online and offline,
    blendwork and private life,
    and are part of a globalsocial web.
    That’swhythey are more difficult to grasp.
  • The Internet went down!
  • We believe today’s consumers ...
    are empowered
    They have the means to make or break brands on a scale never seen before.
  • Stock value – 20%!
  • 684.000.000users
    CorrecterthanBritannica
  • We are ALLadvertisers
    A.G.
  • We believe today’s consumers ...
    are revealing more emotions
    Decisions have always been strongly guided by emotions, now tapping into them has become easier.
  • People love brands!
  • We believe today’s consumers ...
    are smarter than ever
    They have become part-time marketers.
    That is why we allow them to walk in your shoes.
  • Me-marketing is hot
  • 45%
    Createadvertising
  • 66%
    Feedback onnewproducts
  • Part time marketeer
    Post modern nomad
    Internet is the biggestfacilitator in humanconversations
    Emotional
    Empowered
  • Part time marketeer
    Post modern nomad
    People are the oil of the conversationrevolution
    Emotional
    Empowered
  • Part time marketeer
    Post modern nomad
    Emotional
    Empowered
  • Hype or trend?
    TREND!Metcalfe’slaw…
  • We knowthings are changing,we don’tknowhow to act uponit
  • A revolutionimpliesCHANGE
  • Needfor RADICAL change
  • It’s time to jump and to become…
    The Conversation Manager
  • Not just aboutobserving & joining social media
  • integration of word-of-mouthin all marketing thinking & acting
  • Before we start…
  • Let’skill a few myths
    Monster
  • 6%
    6%
    88%
    1
    It’s not all online these days!
    O PS
    94% offline conversations
  • 2
    All sectors, all people!
    1
    2
    3
  • 3
    They’renot as negative as youthink!
    6% - 18% = 
    82% - 94% = 
  • Philosophy
    Conversation
    Advertising
    Brand
  • Philosophy
    Conversation
    Activation
    Brand
  • STEP 1: Brand leverage
  • Brand Conversations
    Purchase brand
    Brand leverage
    R²=.50
    Brand Identification
    Promote brand
    Brand isclose to ideal
    Brand Perception
  • No/low brand identification
    Brand values
    My values
    High brand identification
  • Product quality decreases --- Customer experiences decreases --- Prices go up
  • 20% increase in loyal customers during the last three years!
  • ‘WE’ make(s) the difference!
  • Positive/Neutral
    Negative
  • Brand Conversations
    Purchase brand
    Brand leverage
    R²=.50
    Brand Identification
    Promote brand
    Brand isclose to ideal
    Brand Perception
  • Brands are emotions!
  • We look waytoorationalto brands!
  • Top 5 brands of the world according to interbrand
  • Top 5 brands of the world according to interbrand
    Top 5 brands of the world according to facebook
    19
    2,7
    2,6
  • Top 5 brands of the world according to interbrand
    Top 5 brands of the world according to facebook
    6
    0,6
    2,6
  • >
  • 1
    Brand identificationis KEYforthe Conversation Manager
  • Step2: AdvertisingbecomesACTIVATION
  • Advertising is thestart of a good conversation
  • Number of mentions
    Number of re-tweets
    Number of followers
  • Number of reactions
    Number of sharing
    Number of fans
  • Number of blogs
    Numberconversations
    Number viewers
  • What should people tell each other
  • Activationforthe sake of activation
  • Remember the story?
  • Happy orsad?
    Marketing managerwillbehappy
    Conversation Managerwillbesad
  • Activation asks for strategic thinking
  • BUYING
    ACTIVATION
    CONVER-
    SATIONS
    PARTICIPANTS
    BUZZ
    ACTIVATION
  • 7  350.000.000
  • 3.700.000 watched a BBC documentary
    127.000 followersget a daily update
    20% increase in tourismforQueensland
    1.9M investment, 330M in airtime
  • Giving Back!
  • Lucky Time
  • Branded utility: offer VALUE
  • Evolution of beauty: Dove case studyA new way of advertising…A new brand activation research model…
  • Exposure: 23%
    Correct brand recall: 33%
    Effectiveness score: 8%
    Exposure: 24%
    Correct brand recall: 30%
    Effectiveness score: 7%
  • Overall likeability campaign:
    8.3
    Overall likeability campaign:
    7.2
    31%
    24%
    21%
    17%
    17%
    16%
    16%
    12%
    8%
    8%
    6%
    6%
    5%
    4%
    3%
    3%
    2%
    0%
    0%
    0%
    1
    2
    3
    4
    5
    6
    7
    8
    9
    10
  • No exposure
    Only indirect exposure
    Direct exposure
    N = 1.503
    Filter: none
  • Buzz activation can reach different levels of engagement with often unexpected outcomes
    0%
    0%
    buzz activation
    35%
    37%
    81%
    81%
  • Originality of the spot
    Spot was beautiful made
    Message of the film
    Brand
  • 9 on 10 conversations were about the campaign message
  • Fathers & people withno daughters
    In a regular post test, we would have missed their opinion.Just because they are no part of our target group.
  • What else did we miss?
    Although, in WOM cases. They often function as connectors
  • What else did we miss?
    Originality of the spot
    Direct exposure
    23%
    Spot was beautiful made
    Indirect exposure
    3%
    Message of the film
    Spread the word
    29%
    Brand
    The message was the key driver for connectors to spread the word.
  • They went a step further...
  • And so did the consumer...
  • How to makeadvertisingsticky?
  • Simplicity
    1
    Unexpectedness
    2
    Concreteness
    3
    Credibility
    4
    Emotional
    5
    Stories
    6
    How to makeadvertisingsticky?
  • 2
    What should consumers be saying to each other after they’ve seen my ad?
  • Step 3: Manage yourconversations
  • Philosophy
    Conversation
    Activation
    Brand
  • As a manager
    As a brand
    As a peer
    Observe
    Facilitate
    Join
  • As a manager
    As a brand
    As a peer
    Observe
    Facilitate
    Join
  • As a manager
    Observe
  • As a manager
    Observe
  • As a manager
    As a brand
    As a peer
    Observe
    Facilitate
    Join
  • 100 = 100
    Are youcoolenough to drive a Ford Fiesta?
  • 4.300.000 YouTube views
    500.000 Flickr views
    3.000.000 Twitterimpressions
    50.000 leadsfor the Fiesta (97% has no Ford)
  • “Every brand that takes itself serious, will have a brand community by 2015”
    Joseph Jaffe
  • As a brand
    Facilitate
  • As a manager
    As a brand
    As a peer
    Observe
    Facilitate
    Join
  • OUCH!
    As a peer
    Join
  • OUCH!
    “It’s our page, we set the rules”
    Nestlé, on its own fanpage...
  • “Pleasedon’tchange OUR brand; we loveit the wayit is”
  • Onnewyearseve,
    Made a mistake…
    among 50% of itscustomers
    about…money!
  • The followingtakes place between 8pm and 12am
  • 31/12 9u22
    First reaction
  • 162
  • 01/01 3am
    Hell breaks loose…
  • 164
  • 01/01 10am
    Rabobank reacts
  • 24/01/2011
    166
    “Ik heb het even nagekeken en ook bij mij is dit het geval.
    Ik veronderstel dat er dus door een fout in de afrekening geen rekening werd gehouden met de vrijstellingsdrempel.
    Wij onderzoeken het en zetten het probleem zo snel mogelijk recht.”
  • 01/01 12am
    Positivereactions
  • 168
  • As a peer
    Join
  • @Steven_InSites
    What if...
    The conversation becomes sales critical?
    By Steven Van Belleghem, Managing Partner InSites Consulting
    & Annemiek Temming, Consumer insight manager Danone
    #CM48
  • The critical incident
    Observe: What was the impact?
    Facilitate/Join: What did Danone do?
    Facilitate/Join: What did we learn?
  • On May 22nd 2010, Foodwatch and Kassa awarded Actimel het Gouden Windei, for misleading Dutch consumers.
  • On May 22nd 2010, Actimel got awarded het Gouden Windei, for
    misleading Dutch consumers.
    The largest news website in The Netherlands, nu.nl and a plethora of blogs and tweets mentioned this.
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • Consumers reacted and started and joined conversations.
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • Sales decreased.
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • Danone had a crisis communication team, but no online dialogue team in place.
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • The critical incident
    Observe: What was the impact?
    Facilitate/Join: What did Danone do?
    Facilitate/Join: What did we learn?
  • As a manager
    As a brand
    As a peer
    Observe
    Facilitate
    Join
  • We used InSites´ Conversation Mapping
    Research tool to map, filter and analyse
    the conversation on het Gouden Windei,
    Actimel and Danone.This is what we found.
    *Conversation Mapping Research is survey based
  • 10%
    of consumers talked about functional dairy products in the last 3 months.
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • Online? Yes. But most of the conversationtakes place offline.
    H
    W
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • No surprise: Most conversations are withstrong ties.
    WH
    Friends &Family
    Me
    Me
    70%
    Friends & Family
    21%
    Well known
    5%
    Don’t really know
    4%
    Stranger
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • Credibility of the claimis the top conversation topic (>75% of conversations)
  • 20%
    of the people mention that conversations are a reason to stop drinking or eating functional dairy products.
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • Back to the most important question:What was the impact?
  • Heavy Actimel users have a more negativeperception of Actimel
    They account for 80% of all Actimel sales
  • A substantial part of them accounted they stopped drinking Actimel
  • 8%
    Was influenced by viral spreading.
    21%
    Was influenced via newspaper.
    61%
    Was influenced via KASSA.
    5%
    Did active information retrieval via Foodwatch.
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • Category
    42%
    40%
    *Mainly influenced by thecredibility of the corporatebrand.
    26%
    47%
    34%
    *Mainly influenced by KASSA
    11%
    Conversations on Actimel are now 3 timesmore negative than the category average.
  • high
    BASHING
    SERENADE
    Change
    BARKING
    BONDING
    low
    +++
    ---
    Tone
  • high
    BASHING
    SERENADE
    Change
    BARKING
    BONDING
    low
    +++
    ---
    Tone
  • high
    BASHING
    SERENADE
    Change
    BARKING
    BONDING
    low
    +++
    ---
    Tone
  • Key learnings so far:
  • The critical incident caused an increase in
    negative consumer conversations
    There are BELIEVERS & NON BELIEVERS
  • Decrease of:
    Sales
    Brand perception
    NPS score
    Buying intention
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • Can help Actimel
  • Consumers LEADthe conversation
  • The critical incident
    Observe: What was the impact?
    Facilitate/Join: What did Danone do?
    Facilitate/Join: What did we learn?
  • Classical response
    We did a mainstream press release
    We made an appearance at the KASSA television show
    We contacted “Family Danone”, our own core consumer group
    We created a standard reply to consumer reactions
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • But we did more
    This case made us realize our relationship with consumers is really really important to us. It accelerated our efforts to open up to consumers and start a dialogue. For us, it translated into two main learnings (and related actions):
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • We are learning to become ‘open’
  • Learning 1)We were in broadcasting mode, not in dialogue mode. Broadcasting makes brands vulnerable. Action:
    • We invited Foodwatch to visit us in Paris (more journalists and consumers are planned)
    • Although we’re still learning, we’re more and more joining the conversation online
  • Learning 2)We were focussing too much on functional benefits. And almost forgot how important a relationship with our customers is. Action:
    • We embrace the fact that the functional benefits are always part of the conversation
    • We appointed a new director Health affairs and public affairs to totally commit to health and public affairs concerns
    • We started a rebranding campaign to add emotional benefits and to tell our real brand story
  • And there’s good news
    We created a best practice for the Danoneorganisation.
    And: Sales are picking up.
    @Steven_InSites #cm48
  • The critical incident
    Observe: What was the impact?
    Facilitate/Join: What did Danone do?
    Facilitate/Join: What did we learn?
  • What Danone should have done
    Online CM
    We are right
    Hybrid
  • What Danone should have done
    Online CM
    We are right
    Hybrid
    Don’t deny the discussion: facilitate the discussion on functional benefits online (credibility is the top conversation topic).
    Facilitate the believers (still 40%).
    Use mainstream media as a spotlight on the conversation on functional benefits (remember KASSA vs viral).
  • high
    BASHING
    SERENADE
    Change
    BARKING
    BONDING
    low
    +++
    ---
    Tone

  • Thank you!
    Sorry...
    Listen
    Personal
    Open
    Askquestions
    Engagement
    Honest
    6 Rules of participation
  • Do I alwaysneed to answer?
    No, youdon’t!
  • Whennot?
    Emotionalreactions
    Whenpeople are talking
    Pickyourfights
    Whenyouneed to think
  • 3
    Joining the conversation isthe essence of marketing
  • That’s the philosophy of…
    The Conversation Manager
  • A story of CHANGE
  • STRATEGY
    nottactical
  • integration of word-of-mouthin all marketing thinking & acting
  • Long term goal:Be ambitious
  • “Success is going from failure to failure without the loss of enthusiasm”
  • Start yourchange
  • “People are very open fornewthings,
    as long as they are exactlylike the oldones”
    Charles Kettering
  • “Everyonethinksaboutchanging the world,butnoonethinks of changinghimself”
    Leo Tolstoy
  • 48
  • Thank you!Available as interactive App for iPad, the first in the worldDownload it from the App STore
    Good luck!
    Questions, feedback, remarks:
    Steven@InSites.eu
    Follow me: @Steven_InSites
    Join me on LinkedIn
    www.theconversationmanager.com
    #CM48
    @Steven_InSites
  • Project: Conv mgm Vlerick Masters
    Introduction by Ilse
    Goal:
    Create an impactful strategy & implementation plan for the Vlerick Masters using the philosophy of today
    Make sure this plan can be used
  • Deliverable
    Presentation of 15 minutes
    Conversation Management plan:
    PPT format
    More background than presentation (you can use notes if you want)