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Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
Chapter 16: Political Parties.
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Chapter 16: Political Parties.

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  • 1. American Political Parties – Chapter Sixteen
  • 2. Political Parties. ―A political party is a group of people with broad common interests who organize to win elections, control government, thus influence government policies.‖
  • 3. Political Parties 1. Parties can be principle-oriented, issue-oriented, or election-oriented. 2. The two major American political parties are election-oriented.
  • 4. Political Parties in the US Getting Elected?  Spatial Model of Elections  1. All political issues can be represented on a single dimension, left-to-right scale. All voters, parties, and politicians can be placed on that scale.  2. People on the far right are the most conservative.  3. People on the far left are the most liberal.  4. People in the middle are moderate.  5. People vote for the candidate closest to them on the scale.
  • 5.  The Spatial Model leads produces the Median Voter Hypothesis  The best possible position for a politician who cares only about winning is in the center. 3. Political Parties in the US Extremely Liberal Extremely Conservative 0 10050 Median Voter Candidate A Candidate B
  • 6.  Why do we have a two-party system? 3. Political Parties in the US Extremely Liberal Extremely Conservative 0 10050 BushKerryNader Third parties rarely / never win
  • 7. 3. Political Parties in the US Extremely Liberal Extremely Conservative 0 10050 YOUObama McCain
  • 8. What Do Political Parties Do?  1. Recruit the BEST candidates to run for office.  2. Inform and educate the voters concerning important issues.  3. DEFINE the issues to the voters.  4. Influence government action and policies.  5. Win government office so its party can govern.
  • 9. What do parties do…Continued. Act as a Watchdog—Parties that are out of power keep a close eye on the actions of the party in power for a blunder or bad behavior to use against them in the next election.
  • 10. One Party Systems  1. The single political party IS the government.  2. A S.P.S. is always a dictatorship.  3. Why?  1. Examples:  Iraq under the Baath Party.  Iran - Theocracy  China today.  North Korea today.  Vietnam today.  ANY/ALL command economy!
  • 11. One-Party Systems Chapter 5, Section 2 Types of One-Party Systems Example: Mexico . Modified One-Party Systems where one party regularly wins most elections One Party Systems where only one party is allowed. Example: Dictatorships such as China.
  • 12. Two Party System – U.S. Republicans  1. Hamiltonians.  2. Adam Smith – Economist.  3. Reps. Started out as the Federalist Party – 1789.  Hamilton v. Jefferson Democrats  1.Jeffersonians.  2. John Maynard Keynes – Economists.  3. Started as the Anti – Federalists and then became the Democratic – Republicans. 1789.
  • 13. Federalists vs. Jeffersonian Republicans The Comparison Adams’ T.V. Political Ad. Anti Jefferson Add
  • 14. Why Only Two Political Parties In U.S?  1. Winner take all.  2. NO representation by coming in second!  3. Voters ―Don’t want to throw their vote away.‖
  • 15. Multi Party Systems.  1. Most democracies have a multi party system.  2. Many different IDEOLOGIES represented in government.  3. A COALITION government must be formed after the election.
  • 16. Multiparty Systems Chapter 5, Section 2 Advantages:  1. Provides broader representation of the people.  2. More responsive to the will of the people.  3. Give voters more choices at the polls. Disadvantages: 1. Cause parties to form coalitions, which can dissolve easily. 2. Failure of coalitions can cause instability in government.
  • 17. Death of Federalist Party.  1. War of 1812.  2. New England states tried to negotiate a separate peace treaty with England.  3. Rest of country saw this as treason.  4. End of Federalists.
  • 18. ―Era of Good Feelings‖ 1816-1824.  1. With only one political party, Democratic-Republicans, There was very little public political fighting.  2. Politically, things seemed O.K.
  • 19. Democratic – Republican Spilt - 1828 Democrats  1. Andrew Jackson – Leader of the Democrats.  2. ―Born in a log cabin.‖  3. ―Robbed‖ of the 1824 election by the ―Corrupt Bargain.‖ Whigs  1. Accused Jackson of being a ―Big Wig.‖  2. This was an insult.  3. The ―Big Whig‖ accusers become known as the Whig Party.  4. Most Ex Federalists joined Whig Party.
  • 20. Second Party System 1828-1856 Democrats • Led by Andrew Jackson. • Used party organization to mobilize voters. • Used new convention system to select party nominee. Whigs • Built a coalition of Northern Industrialists and rich Southerners. • Led by Daniel Webster and Henry Clay at times.
  • 21. Slavery and Political Parties.  1. By the 1850’s the anti slavery factions, Whigs and Republicans, joined together and became just the Republican Party.  2. Anti slavery.  3. Pro national bank.  4. Pro internal improvements.  5. Pro free land in the west.  6. Pro protective tariffs.
  • 22. Democrats.  1. Pro slavery.  2. Anti national bank.  3. Anti free land.  4. Anti internal improvements.  5. Anti tariffs.
  • 23. Civil War Results.  1. Republican Party in control of country for years, till end of 1920’s. Hamiltonians in control.  2. Democratic Party hangs on by the skin of its teeth.  3. Senate system helps Democratic Party regroup and build its power over time. The Grey Beard System!
  • 24. Great Depression and the Rise of the Democratic Party.  1. 1920’s is height of Republican power.  2. Hamiltonians in control. ―Trickle down theory.‖  3. Calvin Coolidge: ―The business of America is business.  4. Great Depression(1929) sweeps Republicans out of office. F.D.R. elected President-1932.
  • 25. ―The New Deal.‖ This was the start of government programs to manage the economy and create social programs. Keynesian Economics. Fiscal policy to speed up or slow down the economy.
  • 26. Democratic Era. 1932-1980.  1. Democratic era ends after the 1970’s.  2. Stagflation.  3. High oil prices.  4. Iranian hostage crisis.  5. Uninspiring Jimmy Carter president.
  • 27. Republican Revolution. 1980-2004.  1. Hamiltonians back in control.  2. Arthur Laffer ― Curve.‖  3. ―Supply-Side Economics.‖  4. Another version of ―Trickle Down Economics?‖  5. ―Reaganomics.‖  6. Bill Clinton President between 1992-2000.
  • 28. Republican Fiscal Policy 1.Hamiltonians 2.1920’s – Trickle Down Theory. Tax cut for the rich. 3.1980’s Supply-Side Economics. Tax cut for the rich. 4. 2000’s G.W. Bush. Tax cut for the rich.
  • 29. Resurgence of Democrats. 2006. 1. Democrats retook control of both Houses of Congress in 2006. 2. Iraq and its many issues have been a drag on the Republican Party.
  • 30. 2008. Democrats regain control of the Presidency, retain control of the Senate, and retain control of the House. QuickTime™ and a decompressor are needed to see this picture.
  • 31. Who Controls What? Chapter 5, Section 3 1968–1976 Republicans hold the presidency Congress is controlled by Democrats 1976–1980 Democrats hold the presidency Congress is controlled by Democrats 1980–1992 Republicans hold the presidency Senate controlled by Republicans 1980-1986, controlled by Democrats from 1986 to 1994 1992 – 2000 Democrats hold the presidency Congress controlled by Republicans, 1994-2006. 2000 Republicans hold the presidency Congress is controlled by Republicans 2006 Democrats retake both houses of Congress. 2008 Democrats retake presidency, retain Both Houses of Congress. 2010 Republicans retake the House
  • 32. Who Controls What Continued.  1. 2010. Republicans retake the House. Democrats keep the Senate.  2. 2012. No change.  3. 2014 No change.  4. 2016 ????????????
  • 33. 1860
  • 34. 1964
  • 35. 1968
  • 36. Nixon McGovern 1972
  • 37. 1976
  • 38. 1980
  • 39. 2000 Election
  • 40. 2004 Election Map
  • 41. Election 2008
  • 42. 2012
  • 43. Third Parties  1. A third party is ANY party that’s NOT Democratic OR Republican.  2. There are many different third parties.  3. A third party candidate has never won the presidency. They have been elected Governor. Jessie Ventura anyone?
  • 44. Minor Parties in the United States Chapter 5, Section 4 Splinter Party Example: ―Bull Moose‖ Progressive Party Economic Protest Parties Example: The Greenback Party Ideological Parties Example: Libertarian Party Types of Minor Parties Single-issue Parties Example: Free Soil Party
  • 45. Impact of Third Parties.  1. If a third party has a popular issue, it will be absorbed by a major party. Social Security?  2. A third party can throw an election one way or another.  3. 1992. Reform Party candidate Ross Perot helped Bill Clinton to defeat George Bush Sr. Clinton received less than 50% of popular vote.  4. 2000. Green Party candidate Ralph Nader helped George W. Bush defeat Al Gore. Bush LOST the popular vote to Gore.
  • 46. Obstacles to Third Parties.  1. Dems and Reps automatically on all states ballots.  2. Third parties must get petitions signed in all states to get on ballot.  3. Winner take-all-system. NO representation for second place.  4. Why vote for a loser?
  • 47. Minor Parties: Third- Partyism  Minor parties are not a threat to the two major parties.  Only eight third parties have won any electoral votes in a presidential contest.  The third parties that have had some success are:  1996 and 1992: Ross Perot’s Reform Party  1968: George Wallace’s American Independent Party  1924: Robert LaFollette’s Progressive Party  1912: Teddy Roosevelt’s Bull Moose Party  1856: Millard Fillmore's American Party
  • 48. 1992
  • 49. Republicans v. Democrats
  • 50.  Are generally in favor of the Government playing a larger role to make social change AND manage the economy.  Tend to favor a more limited Government that does not intervene as much into people’s lives or business.
  • 51. Balanced Budget  Raise taxes on the wealthy with some budget cuts.  Continue/increase tax cuts for the wealthy. Increase Federal spending while creating larger Federal deficits.  This behavior created the rise of the conservative Republican Tea Party.
  • 52. Characteristics of Each Party  Generally reps poor, working class, and minorities..  Dems less organized and have lower voter turn out.  Reps the wealthy, middle class, and corp.  Reps have a much higher voter turn out.
  • 53. Wealth Distribution  Likes to decrease the gap between the rich and the poor with the use of taxation, gov’t programs, especially public education.  Lower taxes on working/middle class.  Believes in ―Trickle Down‖ theory or ―Supply-Side‖ economics.  Lower taxes on wealthy and corporations.
  • 54. Abortion  Believes and supports pro- choice.  Are pro-life. Are for laws to outlaw or make abortions harder to get.
  • 55. Union Labor  Are in favor of unions and collective bargaining.  Like to side towards individual efforts and competition in the workplace. Anti-Union.  Sought to keep unions out of newly formed Transportation Security Admin.
  • 56. Social Programs  With increase tax revenues, Democrats like to fund social programs as a safety net for disadvantaged people.  Affordable Health Care Act is good example.(Obama Care)  Less tax money often leads to decreased funding for social programs.  Many Republicans argue that people’s hard work should be kept for themselves instead of being used to benefit other people.
  • 57. National Defense.  Generally would support less spending on defense in favor of social programs.  ―Guns vs. Butter.‖  They are in favor of bigger defense budgets and less social programs.  EXCEPT for the Tea Party who wants to cut ALL federal spending.
  • 58. Affirmative Action  Tend to be more in favor of affirmative action as they argue that it leads to more equality.   Are against affirmative action, but they say there should be more restrictions on it to ensure that the law does not totally overpower natural competition.
  • 59. Environment/Safety They favor Green laws. Believe in Global Warming. Do not like Green laws because they think it hurts business. Do not believe in Global Warming.
  • 60. Gun Control  Democrats:  Favor gun control to help control crime.  Republicans:  Opposes any gun control laws as it’s unconstitutional and takes away individual freedom.
  • 61. Flag Burning  Democrat:  Flag burning is political symbolic speech and is protected by the First Amendment.  Republican:  Protect the flag from burning by a constitutional amendment.
  • 62. Prayer in School  Democrats:  Violation of the separation between church and state. No prayer in schools.  Republicans:  It is a religious right and our Christian heritage. There needs to be prayer in school.
  • 63. Gay Rights  Democrats:  Favor: Gays rights and same sex marriage are their civil rights. O.K. for Gays in Military.  Republicans:  Oppose: Marriage is a sacred trust between a man and woman. No Gays in Military.
  • 64. Death Penalty Democrats: Oppose: It is not a deterrent and innocent people are in jeopardy. Republicans: Favor: The death penalty is necessary and effective to deter crime.
  • 65. Healthcare  Democrats:  Government should require universal access to healthcare. Too many American with no health insurance. Dems pushed through Obamacare.  Republicans:  Private insurers are preferable to government controlled system. Against Obamacare.
  • 66. Social Security and Medi – Care. Democrats: Maintain status quo. Republicans: Privatize both Social Security and MediCare.
  • 67. Minimum Wage Democrats: Favor Increasing the minimum wage to help workers. Republicans: Oppose raising the minimum wage because it hurts businesses. Would like to lower it OR get rid of it completely.
  • 68. Education Democrats: In favor of spending more on public education. Republicans: Less spending on current public education. Favor vouchers and charter schools.
  • 69. Immigration  Democrats: Favors amnesty for illegal aliens and more legal protection for undocumented workers.  Republicans: Tougher immigration laws and no amnesty.

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