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Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
Wb eng vowelsintro
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Wb eng vowelsintro

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  • Web site source for pix http://www.ling.yale.edu:16080/ling120/Gestural_structure/MRI_Vowels/ Clark and Yallop 1995 p 251 (similar drawings Rogers 2000 p 28 29 30 figures 2.5 2.8 and 2.9
  • Figures 2.17, 2.18 and 2.19 p 34
  • Real xrays compared to acoustics Related e-article http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/johnm/ball.htm
  • Rogers 2000 p 33
  • Transcript

    • 1. Introduction to English vowels September 2006
    • 2. Description of vowels: HAR <ul><li>Three basic ‘dimensions’: Height, advancement and rounding </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Height or ‘tongue height’: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>High, mid, low </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Advancement or ‘tongue advancement’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Front, central, back </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Rounding or ‘lip rounding’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Rounded, unrounded </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Finer divisions may be useful (more steps) </li></ul>
    • 3. The key (‘point’) vowels [i a u] Real vowels http://www.ling.yale.edu:16080/ling120/Gestural_structure/MRI_Vowels/ Artist’s conception Graphics unavailable. Similar images at : http://www.ling.yale.edu/ling120/Gestural_structure/MRI_Vowels/index.html Graphics unavailable. For similar drawings, see Rogers 2000 p 28 29 30, figures 2.5 2.8 and 2.9
    • 4. Stylized tongue positions <ul><li>Most phonetics books use “artists’ conceptions” of vowel articulation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Exaggerate differences of tongue position in oral cavity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Miss large differences in pharynx </li></ul></ul>
    • 5. Rogers Vowel Diagrams of GA (p 34) <ul><li>Graphics unavailable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>See Figures 2.17, 2.18 and 2.19 p 34 of Rogers 2000 </li></ul></ul>
    • 6. More X-rays with acoustics <ul><li>Graphics unavailable </li></ul><ul><li>For related info see http://www.phon.ucl.ac.uk/home/johnm/ball.htm </li></ul>
    • 7. Traditional vowel diagrams <ul><li>The acoustic data based on F1 and F2 resonances are quite similar to traditional vowel diagrams </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We’ll talk more about F1 and F2 later in course </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For now I’ll let you hear them </li></ul></ul><ul><li>But basic descriptive properties are correlated with real physical differences </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Anyway they’re very useful and the HAR scheme is world standard for descriptive phonetics </li></ul></ul>
    • 8. Rogers’ p. 33 table of GA Vs <ul><li>Graphic unavailable. See text p 33. </li></ul><ul><li>“ General American” </li></ul>
    • 9. The Simple Vowels of GeneralAmerican (GA) <ul><li>The ‘simple’ vowels </li></ul><ul><li>Front Central Back* </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[i] ‘b ea t’ [u] ‘boot’ higher high </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[I] ‘b i t’ [U] ‘book’ lower high </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>( [e] ) ( [o] ) higher mid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[E] ‘b e t’ [´] ‘sof a’ [ç] ‘bought’ lower mid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[√] ‘but’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[Q] ‘b a t’ [A] ‘Bob’ (lower) low </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>* Back vowels except [A] are rounded; the rest are unrounded </li></ul></ul>
    • 10. The Simple Vowels W. Canadian (WCE) <ul><li>The ‘simple’ vowels </li></ul><ul><li>Front Central Back* </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[i] ‘b ea t’ [u] ‘boot’ higher high </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[I] ‘b i t’ [U] ‘book’ lower high </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>( [e] ) ( [o] ) higher mid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[E] ‘b e t’ [´] ‘sof a’ lower mid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[√] ‘but’ </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[Å] (higher) low </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[Q] ‘b a t’ ‘B o b, b ou ght’ (lower) low </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>*All back vowels including [Å] are rounded; the rest are unrounded </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Note: The ‘official’ IPA description of /ʌ/ is a lower mid back unrounded vowel, but it we will call it a central vowel, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>since that is how the vowel symbol is used in English. (Strict IPA would have us use the symbol / ɐ/ for the vowel in ʼbutʼ.) </li></ul></ul>
    • 11. Diphthongs of GA (and WCE) <ul><li>The ‘simple’ vowels </li></ul><ul><li>Front Central Back </li></ul><ul><ul><li>[ej] ‘b ai t’ [ow] ‘boat ’ (higher) mid </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>[aj] ‘t i de’ [aw] ‘l ou d’ low </li></ul></ul>
    • 12. Variations on transcribing second part of diphthongs <ul><li>Vowel in ‘hide’ variously transcribed </li></ul><ul><li>[aj ] [aI] [a j ] [a iª ] </li></ul><ul><li>They all mean pretty much the same thing </li></ul><ul><li>We’ll use Roger’s convention </li></ul><ul><ul><li>I may slip up and use [aI] </li></ul></ul>
    • 13. The low back vowel in W. Cdn <ul><li>Rogers’ p. 124 uses [ A ] for Cdn vowel in ‘Bob’ or ‘bought’ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>But he notes variation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local pronunciation seems closer to [ Å ] </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>You can choose either symbol for broad transcription </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>I may vary on board </li></ul></ul></ul>
    • 14. Next couple of weeks… <ul><li>We’ll be concentrating on consonant sounds </li></ul><ul><li>Transcription part of first quiz will include broad transcription of all English consonants </li></ul><ul><li>Only the three ‘point vowels’ [i A u] </li></ul>

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