Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Chapter 2.7
Alternative Media and Processes
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Copyright © 2011 Thames& Hudson
Introduction
• “Alternative” media and processes
– Describes artworks made outside traditional methods
– What are “traditi...
Context of Alternative Media
• Emphasis on actions, texts, and environments
• Influence of Jackson Pollock (1950s)
– Actio...
Performance Art
• Name for a new form of creative activity
– 1960s–1970s
• Influenced by John Cage (composer)
– Chance ope...
2.114 Joseph Beuys, Coyote, I Like America and America Likes Me, May 1974. Living sculpture at the René Block Gallery, New...
Joseph Beuys, Coyote, I Like America
and America Likes Me
• Incorporates some of his
life experiences
– German heritage
– ...
2.115 Vito Acconci, Following Piece, 1969. Street Works IV, 23-day activity
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.116 Marina Abramović, The
House with the Ocean
View, 2002. Performance at
Sean Kelly Gallery, New York
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
Conceptual Art
• Promotes ideas as artworks in and of
themselves
– Downplays artworks as products
• Influenced by the Dada...
Barbara Kruger, Untitled
(Your Gaze Hits the Side of
My Face), 1981–3.
Photograph, 55 x 41”
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.118 Bruce Nauman, The
True Artist Helps the World
by Revealing Mystic Truths
(Window or Wall Sign), 1967.
Neon tubing wi...
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.119 Yoko Ono, Wish Tree for Liverpool, 2008. Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool, England
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.120 Mel Chin, Operation Paydirt/Fundred Dollar Bill Project. Devion Charlot, a resident of the 7th ward in New Orleans, ...
2.121 Mel Chin, Operation Paydirt/Fundred Dollar Bill Project. Examples of the fundreds drawn by students in New Orleans,
...
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
Perspectives on Art:
Gateways to Art: Understanding ...
Installation and Environments
• Installation and environments
– Choreographing an entire space
– Not just a single
paintin...
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.122 Claes Oldenburg, The Store,
installation view, 107 East 2nd Street,
New York, December 1, 1961–January 31,
1962. Pho...
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.123 Fred Wilson, Portraits of Cigar Store Owners, from Mining the Museum, installation April 4, 1992–February 28, 1993
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.124 Kara Walker, Insurrection! (Our Tools were Rudimentary, Yet We Pressed On), 2000. Projection, cut paper, and adhesiv...
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
Conclusion
• Alternative media and processes often
emphasize the lived moment
– Actions as they are happening
– Focus on t...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Proc...
Chapter 2.8
The Tradition of Craft
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Copyright © 2011 Thames& Hudson
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.125 Hyo-In Kim, To Be
Modern #2, 2004. Metal
screen, wire, porcelain,
acrylic paint, and found
objects, slightly over li...
Perspectives on Art:
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.127 Seated
Figure, Oaxaca, Mexico, Zapotec
style, 300 BCE–700 CE.
Ceramic,12⅝ x 7 x 7⅜”.
Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.128a Baby Figure, between
12th and 9th centuries BCE.
Ceramic, cinnabar, red ocher,
13⅜” high. Metropolitan
Museum of Ar...
2.128b Colossal
Head, Olmec, 1500–1300 BCE.
Basalt, Museo de
Antropología, Veracruz, Mexico
Gateway to Art:
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.129 Porcelain flask with
decoration in blue
underglaze, Ming Dynasty, 1425–
35. Palace
Museum, Beijing, China
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.130 Karen Karnes, Flower
Container, 1997. Glazed
stoneware, wood-fired, 9¾ x 9½ x
9½”. Collection of Abel Weinrib
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.131 Peter Voulkos, Gallas
Rock, 1960. Stoneware with
slip and glaze, 84 x 37 x 26¾”.
University of California at Los
Ang...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.132 Portland Vase, Roman c.
1–25 CE. British
Museum, London, England
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.133 Rose window and lancets,
north transept, 13th century,
Chartres Cathedral, France
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.134 Dale Chihuly, Fiori di Como, 1998. Handblown glass and steel, 27’6¾” x 11’9¾” × 4’8¾”. Bellagio Hotel, Las
Vegas, Ne...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.135 Death mask from Shaft
Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae.
Also known as Mask of
Agamemnon. Gold, 12” high.
Greece, c. ...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.136 Benvenuto Cellini, Salt Cellar of Francis I, 1540–3. Gold, enamel, ebony, ivory, 11¼ x 8½ x 10⅜”.
Kunsthistorisches ...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes
PART 2
MEDIA AND PROCESSES
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debr...
2.137 Tilleke Schwarz, Count Your
Blessings, 2003. Hand-embroidery
on linen, 26⅜ x 25¼”. Collection of
the artist
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.138 Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach,
1988. Acrylic on canvas, bordered
with printed, painted, quilted, and
pierced cloth, 6’2 ...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts,Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Sh...
2.139 Tlingit Chilkat dancing blanket, 19th century
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.140 Detail of studiolo from the Ducal Palace in Gubbio, Italy, Giuliano da Maiano, after a design by Francesco di Giorgi...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
2.141 Captain Richard Carpenter (Du’klwayella), Bent-corner chest, c. 1860. Yellow cedar, red cedar, and paint, 21¼ x 35¾ ...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWit...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
This...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
2.12...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
1. I...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
1. I...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
2. T...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
2. T...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
3. T...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
3. T...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
4. T...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
4. T...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
5. W...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
5. W...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
6. W...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
6. W...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
7. E...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
7. E...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
8. T...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
8. T...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
9. P...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
9. P...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
10. ...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
10. ...
PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios
PART 2
MEDIAAND PROCESSES
Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Ch 2.7 & 2.8

10,402

Published on

0 Comments
3 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
10,402
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
76
Comments
0
Likes
3
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Transcript of "Ch 2.7 & 2.8 "

  1. 1. Chapter 2.7 Alternative Media and Processes PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Copyright © 2011 Thames& Hudson
  2. 2. Introduction • “Alternative” media and processes – Describes artworks made outside traditional methods – What are “traditional” methods, processes, outcomes? • Performance art – Performed in front of a live audience – Includes all kinds of actions, not just singing, dancing, etc. – Usually in an art-related venue • Conceptual art – Ideas behind an artwork are the most important – Often requires the viewer to complete the piece • Installation – Choreographs an entire space, not just a single artwork
  3. 3. Context of Alternative Media • Emphasis on actions, texts, and environments • Influence of Jackson Pollock (1950s) – Action paintings: splashed, dripped, and flung paint – Drew attention to the artist’s actions • Shift to the actions rather than the product of artist’s work – Artworks themselves can exist for a short period of time – Documentation becomes very important – Instructions, notes, plans, etc. – Photographs and videos
  4. 4. Performance Art • Name for a new form of creative activity – 1960s–1970s • Influenced by John Cage (composer) – Chance operations – Experimental techniques – Zen Buddhism – Cage was one of the first to conduct “Happenings” • Impromptu art actions – Wanted his artwork to draw people’s attention to the life around them
  5. 5. 2.114 Joseph Beuys, Coyote, I Like America and America Likes Me, May 1974. Living sculpture at the René Block Gallery, New York
  6. 6. Joseph Beuys, Coyote, I Like America and America Likes Me • Incorporates some of his life experiences – German heritage – Hitler Youth – German Air Force – Plane crash in World War II • Personal mythology and political symbolism recalled in this performance – Fat and felt – Coyote
  7. 7. 2.115 Vito Acconci, Following Piece, 1969. Street Works IV, 23-day activity
  8. 8. PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Vito Acconci, Following Piece • Acconci’s intention for this art action/performance: – “Choosing a person at random, in the street, a new location, each day. Following him wherever he goes, however long or far he travels. (The activity ends when he enters a private space—his home, office, etc.)” – Documentation • Handwritten note cards with descriptions • Photographs
  9. 9. 2.116 Marina Abramović, The House with the Ocean View, 2002. Performance at Sean Kelly Gallery, New York
  10. 10. PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Marina Abramovic, The House With the Ocean View • Marina Abramovic – Known for performances of extreme bodily endurance • The House with the Ocean View – Twelve-day performance – She did not eat, speak, read, or write while on public view – Isolated in three living spaces – On display – Focused attention on everyday activities – Interactions with viewers in ways other than verbal
  11. 11. Conceptual Art • Promotes ideas as artworks in and of themselves – Downplays artworks as products • Influenced by the Dada movement, which began in 1916 – Absurdist performances in Zurich – Marcel Duchamp’s readymandes – Opened up possibilities for artmaking • Includes everyday objects, popular imagery, ideas
  12. 12. Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Your Gaze Hits the Side of My Face), 1981–3. Photograph, 55 x 41”
  13. 13. PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Barbara Kruger, Untitled (Your Gaze Hits the Side of My Face) • Found imagery – Barbara Kruger trained as a graphic designer – Combined text and imagery • Untitled (Your Gaze Hits the Side of My Face) – Work has a feminist overtone – Addresses the viewer directly
  14. 14. 2.118 Bruce Nauman, The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truths (Window or Wall Sign), 1967. Neon tubing with clear glass tubing suspension supports, 59 x 55 x 2”. Philadelphia Museum of Art
  15. 15. PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Bruce Nauman, The True Artist Helps the World by Revealing Mystic Truths (Window or Wall Sign) • Unconventional medium: neon – Generally used for commercial signs – Inspired by a beer sign • Uses text – Metaphysical in nature – Both serious and funny
  16. 16. 2.119 Yoko Ono, Wish Tree for Liverpool, 2008. Bluecoat Arts Centre, Liverpool, England
  17. 17. PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Yoko Ono, Wish Tree for Liverpool • Yoko Ono’s work: – Poetic instructions to be performed or imagined – Open-ended – More of a beginning point than a end in itself • Wish Tree – “Make a wish, Write it down on a piece of paper, Fold it and tie it around the branch of a Wish Tree, Ask your friends to do the same, Keep wishing Until the branches are covered with your wishes” – Wish Trees have been installed all over the world
  18. 18. 2.120 Mel Chin, Operation Paydirt/Fundred Dollar Bill Project. Devion Charlot, a resident of the 7th ward in New Orleans, shows some of the thousands of fundreds on display at Safehouse
  19. 19. 2.121 Mel Chin, Operation Paydirt/Fundred Dollar Bill Project. Examples of the fundreds drawn by students in New Orleans, Louisiana (top left and right); Marfa, Texas (bottom left); and Collowhee, Tennessee (bottom right)
  20. 20. PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes Perspectives on Art: Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts,Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Mel Chin, Operation Paydirt/Fundred Dollar Bill Project • Mel Chin – Expands the role of the artist to include social initiatives • Operation Paydirt/Fundred Dollar Bill Project – Response to the devastation of Hurricane Katrina – “Operation Paydirt offers pragmatic, scientifically proven method to neutralize hazardous lead that contaminates soil and compromises the health of children” – “Through [the Fundred Dollar Bill Project]…unique artworks will be delivered to the steps of Congress where an even exchange for this ‘creative capital’ will be requested to obtain funding for implementation of Operation Paydirt”
  21. 21. Installation and Environments • Installation and environments – Choreographing an entire space – Not just a single painting, sculpture, drawing, photograph, etc. • Spaces for viewers to walk through • Can include comments on practices of display and institutions • Multi-media
  22. 22. Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Click the image above to launch the video
  23. 23. 2.122 Claes Oldenburg, The Store, installation view, 107 East 2nd Street, New York, December 1, 1961–January 31, 1962. Photo Robert McElroy
  24. 24. PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Claes Oldenburg, The Store • Claes Oldenburg – Sought to break down barriers between art and life • The Store – Storefront at 107 East 2nd Street, New York City – Hand-painted plaster replicas of food and ordinary objects – Fun and inviting environment
  25. 25. 2.123 Fred Wilson, Portraits of Cigar Store Owners, from Mining the Museum, installation April 4, 1992–February 28, 1993
  26. 26. PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Fred Wilson, Portraits of Cigar Store Owners • Fred Wilson – Background as an art educator – Interested in museum display – Takes on the role of a “curator” – Critical examination of museum practices • Mining the Museum – Wilson selected and arranged objects from the collection of the Maryland Historical Society – Portraits of Cigar Store Owners – Examines unconscious racial biases
  27. 27. 2.124 Kara Walker, Insurrection! (Our Tools were Rudimentary, Yet We Pressed On), 2000. Projection, cut paper, and adhesive on wall, 4’8¾” x 29’1⅞”. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
  28. 28. PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Kara Walker, Insurrection! (Our Tools were Rudimentary, Yet We Pressed On) • Technology in Kara Walker’s installations – Silhouette cutouts • Adapted from nineteenth-century techniques – Projections to cast shadows on the wall • Pre-Civil War subject matter – Fictional stories interpreting historical events – Slave revolt in antebellum South
  29. 29. Conclusion • Alternative media and processes often emphasize the lived moment – Actions as they are happening – Focus on the processes involved – Making, thinking, experiencing – Expand our consciousness to see art in the world around us
  30. 30. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes This concludes the PowerPoint slide set for Chapter 2.7 Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts By Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Copyright © 2011 Thames & Hudson
  31. 31. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 2.114 © DACS 2011 2.115 Photo Betsy Jackson. Courtesy the artist 2.116 © Marina Abramović. Courtesy Marina Abramović and Sean Kelly Gallery, New York. DACS 2011 2.117 © Barbara Kruger. Courtesy Mary Boone Gallery, New York 2.118 © ARS, NY and DACS, London 2011 2.119 Photo Karla Merrifield © Yoko Ono 2.120, 2.121 Courtesy The Fundred Dollar Bill Project 2.122 Photo courtesy the Oldenburg van Bruggen Foundation. Photo © Robert McElroy/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY 2.123 © Fred Wilson, courtesy PaceWildenstein, New York. Photo courtesy PaceWildenstein, New York 2.124 Courtesy Sikkema Jenkins & Co., NY Picture Credits for Chapter 2.7
  32. 32. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 1. The kinds of artworks made using alternative media are ______. a. performance art, conceptual art, installations, and environments b. abstract art, landscapes, portraits, and still lifes c. jagged lines, bold colors, smooth surfaces, and random shapes d. graphite, oil paint, and bronze e. clay, fiber, glass, and porcelain Feedback/Reference: Page 240
  33. 33. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 1. The kinds of artworks made using alternative media are ______. a. performance art, conceptual art, installations, and environments b. abstract art, landscapes, portraits, and still lifes c. jagged lines, bold colors, smooth surfaces, and random shapes d. graphite, oil paint, and bronze e. clay, fiber, glass, and porcelain Feedback/Reference: Page 240
  34. 34. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 2. The ideas, methods, and products of ______ inspired the alternative use of media and processes by artists who worked after they did. a. Marcel Duchamp b. Jackson Pollock c. John Cage d. Claes Oldenburg e. all of the other answers Feedback/Reference: Pages 240–46
  35. 35. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 2. The ideas, methods, and products of ______ inspired the alternative use of media and processes by artists who worked after they did. a. Marcel Duchamp b. Jackson Pollock c. John Cage d. Claes Oldenburg e. all of the other answers Feedback/Reference: Pages 240–46
  36. 36. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 3. The traditional, and narrow, definition of "fine art" includes ______. a. sound installations and live performances b. archival documents and personal correspondence c. paintings on canvas and sculptures on pedestals d. ideas for potential artworks that do not yet exist e. all of the other answers Feedback/Reference: Page 240
  37. 37. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 3. The traditional, and narrow, definition of "fine art" includes ______. a. sound installations and live performances b. archival documents and personal correspondence c. paintings on canvas and sculptures on pedestals d. ideas for potential artworks that do not yet exist e. all of the other answers Feedback/Reference: Page 240
  38. 38. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 4. Performance art differs from theater because ______. a. there are live actors b. there is a live audience c. it can include music, dance, poetry, and multi-media technology d. the actions take place in an art context e. none of the other answers Feedback/Reference: Page 240
  39. 39. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 4. Performance art differs from theater because ______. a. there are live actors b. there is a live audience c. it can include music, dance, poetry, and multi-media technology d. the actions take place in an art context e. none of the other answers Feedback/Reference: Page 240
  40. 40. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 5. The most important aspect of a piece of conceptual art is ______. a. the subject that we can clearly see b. the idea behind the artwork c. the permanent product that an artist produces d. an object that can be marketed and sold e. all of the other answers Feedback/Reference: Page 240
  41. 41. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 5. The most important aspect of a piece of conceptual art is ______. a. the subject that we can clearly see b. the idea behind the artwork c. the permanent product that an artist produces d. an object that can be marketed and sold e. all of the other answers Feedback/Reference: Page 240
  42. 42. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 6. An important difference between Coyote, I Like America and America Likes Me and Following Piece is that Following Piece took place ______. a. in a gallery setting b. in the middle of the night c. in secret d. on the streets of New York e. on top of the Empire State Building Feedback/Reference: Pages 241–42
  43. 43. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 6. An important difference between Coyote, I Like America and America Likes Me and Following Piece is that Following Piece took place ______. a. in a gallery setting b. in the middle of the night c. in secret d. on the streets of New York e. on top of the Empire State Building Feedback/Reference: Pages 241–42
  44. 44. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 7. Barbara Kruger’s Untitled (Your Gaze Hits the Side of My Face) makes the viewer consider which of the following issues? a. stereotypes that are commonly presented in graphic design b. powerful institutions, such as museums c. the problematic ways in which some institutions treat women d. the fact that gazing at beauty is a form of voyeurism e. all of the above Feedback/Reference: Page 243
  45. 45. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 7. Barbara Kruger’s Untitled (Your Gaze Hits the Side of My Face) makes the viewer consider which of the following issues? a. stereotypes that are commonly presented in graphic design b. powerful institutions, such as museums c. the problematic ways in which some institutions treat women d. the fact that gazing at beauty is a form of voyeurism e. all of the above Feedback/Reference: Page 243
  46. 46. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 8. What do Yoko Ono’s Wish Trees and Mel Chin’s Fundred Dollar Bill Project have in common? ◦ a. They rely on the participants for their completion. ◦ b. They were made in response to Hurricane Katrina. ◦ c. They were inspired by a Japanese practice. ◦ d. Both artworks are produced on a beach. ◦ e. All of the images and text are predetermined. ◦ Feedback/Reference: Pages 244–45
  47. 47. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 8. What do Yoko Ono’s Wish Trees and Mel Chin’s Fundred Dollar Bill Project have in common? ◦ a. They rely on the participants for their completion. ◦ b. They were made in response to Hurricane Katrina. ◦ c. They were inspired by a Japanese practice. ◦ d. Both artworks are produced on a beach. ◦ e. All of the images and text are predetermined. ◦ Feedback/Reference: Pages 244–45
  48. 48. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 9. Installations are designed to ______. ◦ a. consider more than an individual work of art ◦ b. transform the traditional space of an exhibition ◦ c. immerse viewers in the artwork ◦ d. design an entire exhibition space as an artwork ◦ e. all of the other answers ◦ Feedback/Reference: Page 246 10. Both Fred Wilson’s Mining the Museum and Kara Walker’s Insurrection! (Our Tools were Rudimentary, Yet we Pressed On) combine ______.
  49. 49. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 9. Installations are designed to ______. ◦ a. consider more than an individual work of art ◦ b. transform the traditional space of an exhibition ◦ c. immerse viewers in the artwork ◦ d. design an entire exhibition space as an artwork ◦ e. all of the other answers ◦ Feedback/Reference: Page 246 10. Both Fred Wilson’s Mining the Museum and Kara Walker’s Insurrection! (Our Tools were Rudimentary, Yet we Pressed On) combine ______.
  50. 50. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 10. Both Fred Wilson’s Mining the Museum and Kara Walker’s Insurrection! (Our Tools were Rudimentary, Yet we Pressed On) combine ______. a. objects from museum collections b. historical occurrences and contemporary viewpoints c. illustrations from a number of fictional stories d. handmade objects from daily life e. none of the other answers
  51. 51. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes 10. Both Fred Wilson’s Mining the Museum and Kara Walker’s Insurrection! (Our Tools were Rudimentary, Yet we Pressed On) combine ______. a. objects from museum collections b. historical occurrences and contemporary viewpoints c. illustrations from a number of fictional stories d. handmade objects from daily life e. none of the other answers
  52. 52. Chapter 2.8 The Tradition of Craft PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Copyright © 2011 Thames& Hudson
  53. 53. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Note to Users: For the videos to play properly in a lecture you’ve saved to your computer, you must copy both the PowerPoint lecture (.ppt) and the video source folder—the folder labeled ―Videos‖ which is next to the presentations inside the ―Art Lectures‖ folder—onto your desktop or hard drive. Or visit http://books.wwnorton.com/books/Gateways-to-Art/ to download individual lectures from the ―For Instructors‖ tab. If you have any issues, please contact the Help Desk at: http://support.wwnorton.com.
  54. 54. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Introduction  By the eighteenth century, certain media, notably painting and sculpture, came to be considered as art, while ceramics, weaving, and embroidery were termed crafts  Crafts came to mean items made to be used rather than simply looked at  The distinction between art and craft was unique to Western culture, and it has now broken down in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries
  55. 55. 2.125 Hyo-In Kim, To Be Modern #2, 2004. Metal screen, wire, porcelain, acrylic paint, and found objects, slightly over life-size
  56. 56. Perspectives on Art: PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts,Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Hyo-In Kim Art or Craft:What’s the Difference?  Craft is an object constructed around the idea of function  Hyo-In Kim’s craft is a hanbok, a traditional Korean dress worn with shoes and a hairpin by women of the upper and royal classes  She has subtly transformed it by making it out of silver- colored wire mesh and by molding the decorative details out of porcelain, which she has then painted gold  Kim intends us to see through the material so that the dress appears to float like a ghostly, disembodied figure—something almost there and yet not quite
  57. 57. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Ceramics  The manufacture of a ceramic object requires the shaping of clay, a natural material dug from the earth, which is then baked at high temperatures to make it hard  The first step in making a ceramic object is to choose a clay  In a process called wedging, the clay is kneaded to work out pockets of air and make the clay easier to work  The ceramist uses one of a number of methods to shape the clay into the form of the finished object  Once it has been shaped, the clay is left to dry  Once dry, the clay is fired in an oven called a kiln at a high temperature  To add the finishing touches, artists apply a glaze
  58. 58. Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Click the image above to launch the video
  59. 59. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields 2.126 Ceramics studio equipment. 1: Clay mixer, dry clay, and wet clay storage bins
  60. 60. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields 2.126 Ceramics studio equipment. 2: Electric ceramic wheels for pottery production
  61. 61. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields 2.126 Ceramics studio equipment. 3: Kilns for firing the ceramic objects
  62. 62. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields 2.126 Ceramics studio equipment. 4: Bins and containers of chemicals used in ceramic glazes
  63. 63. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Coil Method  The art of using coils to create a clay object has been a common hand-building method since ancient times  A coil is created by rolling the clay on a flat surface so that it extends into a long rope-like shape  When making a round vessel, the artist wraps the coil around upon itself and then fuses the sections together by smoothing
  64. 64. 2.127 Seated Figure, Oaxaca, Mexico, Zapotec style, 300 BCE–700 CE. Ceramic,12⅝ x 7 x 7⅜”. Cleveland Museum of Art, Ohio
  65. 65. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Seated Figure, Oaxaca, Mexico, Zapotec-style  This figure was made to be buried in the tomb of a Zapotec ruler and may portray a god or possibly a companion for the deceased  On its headdress and chest the artist has carved two calendar dates in Zapotec writing  The coil method was preferred for constructing rounded objects because the organic line of the coil could be controlled in a way that would complement the piece’s essence or spirit
  66. 66. 2.128a Baby Figure, between 12th and 9th centuries BCE. Ceramic, cinnabar, red ocher, 13⅜” high. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  67. 67. 2.128b Colossal Head, Olmec, 1500–1300 BCE. Basalt, Museo de Antropología, Veracruz, Mexico
  68. 68. Gateway to Art: PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Colossal Olmec Heads Sculpture in Stone and Clay  One of the most striking differences between the Olmec Baby Figure and the colossal heads is the scale  At just over a foot tall, it is closer to the size an actual baby would be  The figurine is an example of both additive and subtractive sculpture. The stone carver of the colossal heads, on the other hand, was working with an extremely hard material and was only able to carve away from the existing block of basalt  The ceramic Baby Figure is also hollow, while the stone head is solid
  69. 69. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Throwing  A potter’s wheel consists of a round disk that revolves while the ceramist shapes the object  By 3000 BCE the Chinese were using potter’s wheels to produce ceramic objects  The potter centers a mound of clay on the turning wheel and then shapes a pot by poking a hole in the middle of the mound, and then pushing and pulling the wall of the pot up and out with both hands as it turns
  70. 70. 2.129 Porcelain flask with decoration in blue underglaze, Ming Dynasty, 1425– 35. Palace Museum, Beijing, China
  71. 71. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Porcelain Flask with decoration in blue underglaze, Ming Dynasty  Produced on a potter’s wheel during the Ming Dynasty almost 600 years ago  The wares were so fine that the users of Ming Dynasty porcelain included the emperor of China himself  In this piece the artist used, first, a blue glaze and then a clear glaze over that to complete the work
  72. 72. 2.130 Karen Karnes, Flower Container, 1997. Glazed stoneware, wood-fired, 9¾ x 9½ x 9½”. Collection of Abel Weinrib
  73. 73. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Karen Karnes, Flower Container  Exemplifies the expert craft of the potter with its simple symmetry in individual parts conjoined into an organic asymmetrical form  Captures the careful attention and symmetry of form that are valued by traditional handcrafters and fuses them with the expressive sensibilities of contemporary art
  74. 74. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Slab Method  When artists use slab construction to make a ceramic object they first roll out a flat sheet of clay  They then cut this clay into the shapes they need to make the object  To make a three-dimensional object, the ceramist takes care to join the corners  This style of working lends itself to making boxes and other forms that have large flat sides
  75. 75. 2.131 Peter Voulkos, Gallas Rock, 1960. Stoneware with slip and glaze, 84 x 37 x 26¾”. University of California at Los Angeles, Franklin D. Murphy Sculpture Garden
  76. 76. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Peter Voulkos, Gallas Rock  Slab construction (and wheel throwing) used in an organic and Expressionistic way  The slabs are evident in the flat planes that dominate this eight-foot-tall sculptural object  Voulkos is known for using clay’s naturalness–its tendency to take on organic forms–and plasticity
  77. 77. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Glass  The process of applying intense heat to melt silica together with lead is the basis for most glass production  Glassblowing, the process of forming a glass vessel by forcing air into molten glass, usually by blowing through a tube, was in use by the first century BCEin Syria and was later adopted and perfected by the Romans
  78. 78. Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Click the image above to launch the video
  79. 79. 2.132 Portland Vase, Roman c. 1–25 CE. British Museum, London, England
  80. 80. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Portland Vase  A stunningly beautiful vessel, created in the Roman Empire during the first century CE  It was made by the dip overlay method: an elongated bubble of blue glass was partially dipped into a crucible of white glass, before the two were blown together  After cooling, the white layer was cut away to form the design  The blue glass forms the background to the figures picked out in white
  81. 81. 2.133 Rose window and lancets, north transept, 13th century, Chartres Cathedral, France
  82. 82. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Rose window and lancets, north transept, Chartres Cathedral, France  The French did something extraordinary with stained glass by using it to make enormous decorative windows that bathed the cathedral in colored light  The large circular windows are accented by the contrast with smaller, tall thin windows with pointed tops  The brilliant blue color in these windows stands as one of the most extraordinary artistic achievements of the early thirteenth century
  83. 83. 2.134 Dale Chihuly, Fiori di Como, 1998. Handblown glass and steel, 27’6¾” x 11’9¾” × 4’8¾”. Bellagio Hotel, Las Vegas, Nevada
  84. 84. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Dale Chihuly, Fiori di Como  To enhance the reception area at the Bellagio Hotel in Las Vegas, Chihuly created a dazzling chandelier made of 2,000 individually blown glass flowers  The strong color, reminiscent of stained glass, enlivens and invigorates the interior and becomes an inviting and memorable symbol of the hotel
  85. 85. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Metalwork  The working of metal has been a measure of human development and an important medium for utilitarian purposes  Metal can be heated to a liquid state and poured into molds  It can also be heated and then hammered into shape, or it can be worked when it is cold  Most metals are strong but malleable and can be bent or stretched to fit the needs of the artist  Gold is particularly well suited for decorative metalwork because it is comparatively soft and easy to shape
  86. 86. Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Click the image above to launch the video
  87. 87. 2.135 Death mask from Shaft Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae. Also known as Mask of Agamemnon. Gold, 12” high. Greece, c. 1550–1500 BCE. National Archaeological Museum, Athens, Greece
  88. 88. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Death mask from Shaft Grave V, Grave Circle A, Mycenae  Was created by laying a thin piece of metal over an object carved to resemble a human face  The artist then carefully hammered the surface of the thin metal until the shape and texture of the design was imprinted in the metal  The artist has deftly given us the impression of a human face by placing objects, like cowrie shells for the eyes, under the surface of the metal and forcing the gold sheet into its final shape  This type of mask was used as a burial mask to cover the face of the departed
  89. 89. 2.136 Benvenuto Cellini, Salt Cellar of Francis I, 1540–3. Gold, enamel, ebony, ivory, 11¼ x 8½ x 10⅜”. Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria
  90. 90. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Benvenuto Cellini, Salt Cellar of Francis I  Created the Salt Cellar of Francis I as an extremely elaborate object to go on the dining table of the king of France  Cellini first sculpted wax models of Neptune and Mother Earth in harmony and at rest  Cellini then covered the wax model with a strong material, perhaps sand and lime, to make a mold  The mold was then heated so that the wax melted and left the center of the mold empty  Cellini poured the molten gold into the mold
  91. 91. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Fiber  Fibers are threads made from animal or vegetable materials (such as fur, wool, silk, cotton, flax, linen) or, more recently, synthetic materials (for example, nylon or polyester)  The fibers can be spun into yarn, string, or thread, then woven or knitted into lengths of textiles
  92. 92. Chapter 2.7Alternative Media and Processes PART 2 MEDIA AND PROCESSES Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Click the image above to launch the video
  93. 93. 2.137 Tilleke Schwarz, Count Your Blessings, 2003. Hand-embroidery on linen, 26⅜ x 25¼”. Collection of the artist
  94. 94. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Tilleke Schwarz, Count Your Blessings  Uses thread in her embroidered works the way another artist might use a pencil  The artist explains that her work aims to be humorous and is “a mixture of contemporary influences, graffiti, icons, texts, and traditional images from samplers”  In the work illustrated here the artist is expressing her fascination with how and what people communicate
  95. 95. 2.138 Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach, 1988. Acrylic on canvas, bordered with printed, painted, quilted, and pierced cloth, 6’2 ⅝” x 5’8½”. Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York
  96. 96. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts,Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Faith Ringgold, Tar Beach  Faith Ringgold’s works are made in collaboration with her mother  Her mother sews the quilted border  Faith paints the scene in the middle  Tar Beach relates to the artist’s own family history and also to her shared experience of being African- American
  97. 97. 2.139 Tlingit Chilkat dancing blanket, 19th century
  98. 98. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Tlingit Chilkat dancing blanket  The Tlingit people, who live on the western coast of Canada and Alaska, combine both animal and plant material in their fiber art  The blanket has been woven entirely by hand from goat wool and cedar bark  In many cases these designs are abstract depictions of animals  Blankets like this were worn on ceremonial occasions  They were very expensive, and the prized possessions of anyone wealthy enough to own one
  99. 99. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Wood  Wood, an organic plant-based material, deteriorates over time, so we have few ancient examples of art objects made in this medium  But we know that wood has been utilized for objects and architecture throughout history  Wood has an innate beauty that can be brought out by cutting and carving  Sanding and polishing a piece of wood gives its surface a mesmerizing beauty
  100. 100. 2.140 Detail of studiolo from the Ducal Palace in Gubbio, Italy, Giuliano da Maiano, after a design by Francesco di Giorgio Martini, c. 1480. Walnut, beech, rosewood, oak, and fruit woods in walnut base, 15’11” x 16’11” x 12’7¼”. Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York
  101. 101. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Detail of studiolo from the Ducal Palace in Gubbio, Italy  Intarsia is a kind of wood mosaic using woods of different colors  The artist took very thin, shaped pieces of wood and organized them to create a masterpiece of illusionistic depth and value  Federico da Montefeltro, the duke of Urbino, who commissioned Martini to do this work, wanted the symbols in this magnificent design to reflect his achievements as a ruler, military commander, collector of books, and patron of the arts
  102. 102. 2.141 Captain Richard Carpenter (Du’klwayella), Bent-corner chest, c. 1860. Yellow cedar, red cedar, and paint, 21¼ x 35¾ x 20½”. Seattle Art Museum
  103. 103. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Captain Richard Carpenter (Du’klwayella), Bent-corner chest  To create this vessel, a plank of cedar was smoothed, notches known as kerfs were cut at three corners, and then the wood was made flexible by exposing it to steam created by fire-baked rocks and water  The plank was then bent at the kerfs and joined at the juncture of the last corner  After that, the chest was carved and painted with an elaborate, symmetrical design that fills the whole surface  A separate base and top were then fitted to the whole
  104. 104. PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts, Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Conclusion  Functional crafts are still practiced and remembered as a part of national histories and cultures, and sometimes as part of a region’s identity  The makers of functional items refined and improved them until they became objects of art  The artist of hand-made objects understands the attributes of various materials and chooses those that fit the function he or she needs it to fulfill  Not all crafts are considered art. But many craft works have been recognized for their excellence and attention to design and originality
  105. 105. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft This concludes the PowerPoint slide set for Chapter 2.8 Gateways to Art: Understanding the Visual Arts By Debra J. DeWitte, Ralph M. Larmann, M. Kathryn Shields Copyright © 2011 Thames & Hudson
  106. 106. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 2.125 Courtesy Trudy Labell Fine Art, Florida. © the artist 2.126 Photos Ralph Larmann 2.127 Cleveland Museum of Art, Gift of the Hanna Fund, 1954.857 2.128a Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. The Michael C. Rockefeller Memorial Collection, Bequest of Nelson A. Rockefeller, 1979, Acc. no. 1979.206.1134. Photo Schecter Lee. Photo Metropolitan Museum of Art/Art Resource/Scala, Florence 2.128b Photo Irmgard Groth-Kimball © Thames & Hudson Ltd, London 2.129 Palace Museum, Beijing 2.130 Courtesy Arizona State University Art Museum, photo Anthony Cunha 2.131 Courtesy the Voulkos & Co. Catalogue Project, www.voulkos.com 2.132 British Museum, London 2.133 © Angelo Hornak/Corbis 2.134 Photo Teresa Nouri Rishel © Dale Chihuly 2.135 National Archaeological Museum, Athens 2.136 Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna 2.137 © the artist www.tillekeschwarz.com 2.138 The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, New York, 88.3620 2.139 © Christie’s Images/Corbis 2.140 Metropolitan Museum of Art, Rogers Fund, 1939, Acc. no. 39.153. Photo Metropolitan Museum of Art/Art Resource/Scala, Florence 2.141 Seattle Art Museum, Gift of John H. Hauberg and John and Grace Putnam, 86.278. Photo Paul Macapia Picture Credits for Chapter 2.8
  107. 107. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 1. In Geoffrey Chaucer’s time, the makers of the fine objects we can see today in the world’s great art museums learned their trade in associations called ______. a. clubs b. workhouses c. schools d. guilds e. none of these Feedback/Reference: Page 248
  108. 108. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 1. In Geoffrey Chaucer’s time, the makers of the fine objects we can see today in the world’s great art museums learned their trade in associations called ______. a. clubs b. workhouses c. schools d. guilds e. none of these Feedback/Reference: Page 248
  109. 109. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 2. The Korean-American artist Hyo-In Kim created the work To Be Modern #2 to emulate a ______, a traditional Korean dress worn with shoes and a hairpin by women of the upper and royal classes. a. hanbok b. kimono c. smoking jacket d. kimchi e. bathrobe Feedback/Reference: Page 249
  110. 110. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 2. The Korean-American artist Hyo-In Kim created the work To Be Modern #2 to emulate a ______, a traditional Korean dress worn with shoes and a hairpin by women of the upper and royal classes. a. hanbok b. kimono c. smoking jacket d. kimchi e. bathrobe Feedback/Reference: Page 249
  111. 111. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 3. This word means the pliability of a material so that it can be easily formed into almost any orientation. a. Brittleness b. Scumbling c. Plasticity d. Opacity e. Intermezzo Feedback/Reference: Page 250
  112. 112. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 3. This word means the pliability of a material so that it can be easily formed into almost any orientation. a. Brittleness b. Scumbling c. Plasticity d. Opacity e. Intermezzo Feedback/Reference: Page 250
  113. 113. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 4. This process, which involves carving away material from a surface where it cannot be reapplied, was used to sculpt the Olmec Colossal Head. a. Additive b. Modeled c. Cast d. Conceptual e. Subtractive Feedback/Reference: Page 251
  114. 114. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 4. This process, which involves carving away material from a surface where it cannot be reapplied, was used to sculpt the Olmec Colossal Head. a. Additive b. Modeled c. Cast d. Conceptual e. Subtractive Feedback/Reference: Page 251
  115. 115. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 5. When an artist is making pottery by hand throwing, the first step when he or she forms the clay on a potter’s wheel is to ______. a. center a mound of clay b. throw it up in the air c. allow the clay to dry d. fire the clay e. form the shape before starting Feedback/Reference: Page 252
  116. 116. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 5. When an artist is making pottery by hand throwing, the first step when he or she forms the clay on a potter’s wheel is to ______. a. center a mound of clay b. throw it up in the air c. allow the clay to dry d. fire the clay e. form the shape before starting Feedback/Reference: Page 252
  117. 117. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 6. Which piece of sculpted Roman glass was named after one of its owners, Margaret Bentinck, an English duchess? a. Bentinck Bowl b. Portland Vase c. Rathbone Urn d. Margaret Crystal e. Windsor Water Goblet Feedback/Reference: Page 253
  118. 118. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 6. Which piece of sculpted Roman glass was named after one of its owners, Margaret Bentinck, an English duchess? a. Bentinck Bowl b. Portland Vase c. Rathbone Urn d. Margaret Crystal e. Windsor Water Goblet Feedback/Reference: Page 253
  119. 119. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 7. Exceptional large-scale stained-glass windows were featured in the construction of which Gothic cathedral in northern France? a. Bruges b. Edinburgh c. Cologne d. Chartres e. None of these Feedback/Reference: Page 254
  120. 120. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 7. Exceptional large-scale stained-glass windows were featured in the construction of which Gothic cathedral in northern France? a. Bruges b. Edinburgh c. Cologne d. Chartres e. None of these Feedback/Reference: Page 254
  121. 121. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 8. The metalworking process called repoussé, used to create the death mask from Mycenae, involves which kind of craftsmanship? a. Casting b. Riveting c. Carving d. Throwing e. Hammering Feedback/Reference: Page 255
  122. 122. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 8. The metalworking process called repoussé, used to create the death mask from Mycenae, involves which kind of craftsmanship? a. Casting b. Riveting c. Carving d. Throwing e. Hammering Feedback/Reference: Page 255
  123. 123. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 9. Processing plant fibers begins with separating the fiber from the plant, then preparing it for use by spinning the fiber into a long ______. a. coil b. rod c. thread d. shaft e. none of these Feedback/Reference: Page 256
  124. 124. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 9. Processing plant fibers begins with separating the fiber from the plant, then preparing it for use by spinning the fiber into a long ______. a. coil b. rod c. thread d. shaft e. none of these Feedback/Reference: Page 256
  125. 125. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 10. Which African-American artist created the fiber work Tar Beach as an autobiographical work about her own experiences growing up in New York? a. Dale Chihuly b. Faith Ringgold c. Tilleke Schwarz d. Margaret Bentinck e. Karen Karnes
  126. 126. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft 10. Which African-American artist created the fiber work Tar Beach as an autobiographical work about her own experiences growing up in New York? a. Dale Chihuly b. Faith Ringgold c. Tilleke Schwarz d. Margaret Bentinck e. Karen Karnes
  127. 127. PowerPoints developed by CreativeMyndz Multimedia Studios PART 2 MEDIAAND PROCESSES Chapter 2.8The Tradition of Craft
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×