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Concert Promotion
Music 229
Concert Promotion
The Promoter is the entrepreneur who has a feel for the music
business and can see an opportunity to mak...
Chapter 1:

Key Representatives

Entertainment Attorney
Read, Draft, and evaluate all contractual agreements
Lawyers are r...
Chapter 1: Key Representatives
Artist Manager
The individual who serves as the artists primary advisor is called an artist...
Chapter 1: Key Representatives
Booking Agent
A talent agent refers to any agent who finds work for creative artists.

Agen...
Chapter 1: Key Representatives
What to look for in an agent
Reach-local, regional, national, international
Type of venues ...
Chapter 1: Key Representatives
Key Elements
Exclusive or nonexclusive
Duration-usually 1-3 years
Rate of commission-usuall...
Chapter 1: Key Representatives
Business Manager
A business manager works closely with the artist manager in establishing
b...
Chapter 1: Key Representatives
Production Manager
Manages the technical side of your production
Sound, Lights, Stage Set
S...
Chapter 1:

Important Terms

Entertainment Attorney
Conflict of Interest
Retainer
Billable Hours
Value Billing
Letter of e...
Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road
Touring is a business, selling tickets, merch, and sponsorship are
important component...
Chapter 2:
Venues

Making Money on the Road

Clubs
100-2,000
Ballrooms
800-1500
Theaters PAC
2000-8000
Auditoriums
500-10,...
Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road
Merchandising (“Merch”)
“Outside of ticket sales, merch revenue is the most important ...
Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road
Merchandising (“Merch”)
Basic Deal
Headliner ROYALTY RATE 72-77%
Artist pays hall fees...
Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road
Merchandising (“Merch”)
One of the newest forms of merch is the concert cd
Basic insta...
Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road
Sponsorship
An artist being sponsored by a company was once considered a sellout.
Comp...
Festival Sponsors
Festival Survey
•  Demographics
–  Gender
–  Age
–  Ethnicity
•  Residence
•  Homeownership
•  Intention to Refinance
•  I...
HAM Fest
	

	

Sponsorship Opportunities for the	

Happy Artists Music Festival

May 3, 2009
HAM Fest
	

	

Sponsorship Opportunities for the	

Happy Artists Music Festival

May 3, 2009
Introduction and Overview
§ Explain what makes the event, project, charity, etc. worth being
associated with.
§ You migh...
History
Provide a bit of background showing the history of the event:
“The HAM Fest was started to represent, speak to and...
Testimonials
Provide Testimonials from past sponsors and past participants of note.
“We came in as a Tier 1 sponsor with H...
Testimonials
Provide Testimonials from past sponsors and past participants of note.
“We came in as a Tier 1 sponsor with H...
Demographics
Happy Music Fans:
§  18 - 25 years old
§  Number over 35 million
§  Born in the 80s, came into consciousne...
HAM Fest 2009
Happy Artist
The Cheery Cheerios
The Smiling Satisfaction Transaction
Smiley Smith
Joan Joyous
Glee Club Con...
HAM Fest 2009 Dates
List all festival dates
List all festival markets
Provide any market specific information
Note if date...
HAM Fest 2009
SPONSORSHIP PLATFORMS
Tier 1: Prosciutto Sponsor
Tier 2: Jamon Sponsor
Tier 3: Candied Ham Sponsor
Tier 4: S...
HAM Fest 2009
SPONSORSHIP PLATFORMS
Tier 1: Prosciutto Sponsor
Tier 2: Jamon Sponsor
Tier 3: Candied Ham Sponsor
Tier 4: S...
HAM Fest 2009
Prosciutto Sponsor
§  Exclusivity in category
§  Logo / marks prominently
featured in all HAM Fest
print m...
HAM Fest 2009
Jamon Sponsor
§  Logo / marks featured in
select HAM Fest print
materials, signage, ads, and
collateral
§ ...
HAM Fest 2009
Candied Ham Sponsor
§  Logo / marks featured in
select HAM Fest signage,
ads, and collateral
§  Access to ...
HAM Fest 2009
Candied Ham Sponsor
§  Logo / marks featured in
select HAM Fest signage,
ads, and collateral
§  Access to ...
Contact
§  For sponsorship opportunities, contact:
§  Samantha Smiley at:
§  HAM Fest 2008
§  PO Box 123
Ebullientvill...
Chapter 2:

Terms

Headliner
Support Act
Billboard/Pollstar
General Admission
Reserved Seats
Comps
Scaling
Gold Circle
Mer...
Chapter 3:

Why, When, and Where to Tour

Preproduction Phase-before capital is invested in gear and other costs
Benefits ...
Chapter 3:

Why to tour

Promote album sales
Sell Merch
Build fan Base
Attract Labels
For most groups signed to a label, t...
Chapter 3:

Touring to Promote Album sales

Parallel business
Create a buzz
In-stores
Sponsors

Touring to Make Money
All ...
Chapter 3:

When to Tour

Big name artists can dictate tour dates.
Headliner
Billed
C0-headling situations
Availability
Ne...
Chapter 3:

Touring Traffic

To much touring traffic can be problematic
Most concert activity occurs between April and Sep...
Chapter 3:

Art of the On-Sale

On-sale or going-up (tickets available to the public)
Two strategies
Put tickets on sale e...
Chapter 3:

Determining which venue to play

The type of venue is largely determined by the amount of tickets that can
be ...
Chapter 3:

Routing the Tour

The type of venue is largely determined by the amount of tickets that can
be sold.
Another i...
Chapter 3:

Terms

Preproduction phase
In-stores
Heritage acts
Headliner
Billed
Buzz plays
Touring traffic
One-off
Radio s...
Chapter 4:

Budgeting

You need to create a plan. A budget is one of the MOST important parts of
that plan.
Projecting Inc...
Chapter 4: Budgeting
Ticket Sales
Fees paid to an artist for performance but the talent buyer are know as
ticket sales.
Gu...
Chapter 4: Budgeting
Ticket Sales
The risk in a straight percentage deal is that the ticket sales is unknown.
Most groups ...
Chapter 4:
Your Budget
Create a detailed Budget for your event by next week.
Income
Ticket Sales
Merch
Sponsorship
Expense...
Chapter 4: Terms
Fee Structures
Priors
Flats
Back end
Gross Potential
Deductions
House Rate
Per Cap
Impressions
See pg 60
...
Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers
A talent buyer is the person or company who pays an act or artist to
perform. The size a...
Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers
Hard Ticket Buyers
Hard ticket buyers primary revenue stream is selling tickets.
Hard ti...
Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers
1990’s –All types of business begin to consolidate. Robert Sillerman begins
buying up re...
Chapter 9: Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers
The promoter pays the act usually through an agent. The promoter agree to
pro...
Chapter 9: Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers
Large Venue Buyers
Many times the venue and the talent buyer are one and the ...
Chapter 9: Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers
Festivals & Fairs
Some of the most established buyers in North America.
Some ...
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Tips for Promoting a Concert

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This interactive guide will help you execute live experiential marketing events featuring music AKA concerts.

http://stevekaplandigial.com

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Transcript of "Tips for Promoting a Concert"

  1. 1. Concert Promotion Music 229
  2. 2. Concert Promotion The Promoter is the entrepreneur who has a feel for the music business and can see an opportunity to make money selling tickets. Promoters are selling a moment in time. They have the capability to persuade the ticket-buying public that this is the show it has to see. Concert Promoters Large Conglomerates Smaller companies Arts Presenters Festivals Symphony Orchestras Entertainment to enhance another activity Fairs Bars
  3. 3. Chapter 1: Key Representatives Entertainment Attorney Read, Draft, and evaluate all contractual agreements Lawyers are regulated by a code of ethics. Other members of the team are not. A well established entertainment Attorney can be an essential networking bridge for aspiring artists. What to look for-Experience Beware of attorneys who branch out into entering management, recording or publishing contracts with their own clients. Retainer Billable Hours Value Billing Letter of engagement
  4. 4. Chapter 1: Key Representatives Artist Manager The individual who serves as the artists primary advisor is called an artist manager, a personal manager, or simply manager. -planner, advisor, organizer, strategist, overseer, coordinator, detail person… Key Elements Identification of Parties General Breadth of Agreement Duties Power of Attorney Compensation Duration Sunset Clause Key Person Clause
  5. 5. Chapter 1: Key Representatives Booking Agent A talent agent refers to any agent who finds work for creative artists. Agents who concentrate on finding live appearances are traditionally referred to as booking agents. What Agents Do Find Bookings Route Tours Buyer generally pays a guarantee-Front End VS a percentage of ticket sales-Back End Booking agents are regulated by the state and require a license. Afm-American Federation of Musicians (Scale)
  6. 6. Chapter 1: Key Representatives What to look for in an agent Reach-local, regional, national, international Type of venues an agency books In-house bookers Honest and mutually satisfactory relationship William Morris Agency Creative Artists Agency Club Agent Line Agent Responsible Agent (RA) Marquee Value
  7. 7. Chapter 1: Key Representatives Key Elements Exclusive or nonexclusive Duration-usually 1-3 years Rate of commission-usually 10% Commissionable income Geographic Limits Key Person Clause
  8. 8. Chapter 1: Key Representatives Business Manager A business manager works closely with the artist manager in establishing budgets, regulating income, weighing in on various deals and running the artist’s career as a “business.” Like a CFO-a financial watchdog Most are CPA or have in-house CPA’s at their firm Tour Budgets Tour Manager (road manager) Manages the day-to-day needs of you and your entourage Transportation and lodging Responsible for Settlement at each venue Coordinated publicity, interviews, appearances, ect…
  9. 9. Chapter 1: Key Representatives Production Manager Manages the technical side of your production Sound, Lights, Stage Set Stage plots & Tech Riders Other Essential Personnel Stage Manager Sound Engineer Monitor Engineer Sound Crew Lighting Crew Backline Crew Stagehands Area Manager Runners
  10. 10. Chapter 1: Important Terms Entertainment Attorney Conflict of Interest Retainer Billable Hours Value Billing Letter of engagement Artist Manager Power of Attorney Commission Duration Sunset Clause Key Person Clause Severability Clause Booking Agent AFM In-House Bookers Line Agent Responsible Agent Marquee Value Exclusivity Commissionable Income Geographic Limits Business Manager Tour Manager Settlement Production Manager
  11. 11. Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road Touring is a business, selling tickets, merch, and sponsorship are important components of the business. Selling Tickets Headliner Ticket prices have doubled over the past decade Strategies to tickets sales High Prices (Eagles) High Volume (Brooks) Ticket prices are often based on how much an artist wants to be paid and how elaborate a production they want to present. Prices are generally hammered out by the acts manager, business manager and agent.
  12. 12. Chapter 2: Venues Making Money on the Road Clubs 100-2,000 Ballrooms 800-1500 Theaters PAC 2000-8000 Auditoriums 500-10,000 Amphitheaters 10,000-15,000 Stadiums 15,000-100,000 Motor speedways 100,000+ Why play smaller venues Genre or style can also determine venue GA vs reserved seating Multi-tiered seating-scaling Usable seating/comps Tour vs one-offs
  13. 13. Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road Merchandising (“Merch”) “Outside of ticket sales, merch revenue is the most important revenue stream for touring artists.” For beginning bands merch often bankrolls the band getting from point A to B. Managers solicit bids from companies Basic deal is usually the longer of one album or touring cycle or recoupment. A buyout option is usually offered. If there is a large advance, royalty rates are lower. “for new artists most deals are worth 75-100k” Merch company often has a employee on tour House Rate or Hall Fee –usually 20-25%
  14. 14. Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road Merchandising (“Merch”) Basic Deal Headliner ROYALTY RATE 72-77% Artist pays hall fees out of its share Artist nets 47-55% Some artist handle their own merch Investment inventory staff, warehousing,distribution,inventory selection. merchandising is more than just selling t-shirts and hats at concerts?
  15. 15. Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road Merchandising (“Merch”) One of the newest forms of merch is the concert cd Basic instant Live Blueprint Cd’s can be complicated with a revenue chain that includes the record label, act, venue, promoter. CD-$25 Label and Artists 30-40% (usually split) Venue 5-10% Packaging 10% Instant Live 20%
  16. 16. Chapter 2: Making Money on the Road Sponsorship An artist being sponsored by a company was once considered a sellout. Companies bankroll tours in every genre Sinage ROI Contact ant the Company or Advertising Firm Better to approach a niche brand More likely to receive marketing support than hard cash Endorsement deals Label Support
  17. 17. Festival Sponsors
  18. 18. Festival Survey •  Demographics –  Gender –  Age –  Ethnicity •  Residence •  Homeownership •  Intention to Refinance •  Income •  Education •  Purchasing Habits •  Cell Phone/Wireless Co.
  19. 19. HAM Fest Sponsorship Opportunities for the Happy Artists Music Festival May 3, 2009
  20. 20. HAM Fest Sponsorship Opportunities for the Happy Artists Music Festival May 3, 2009
  21. 21. Introduction and Overview § Explain what makes the event, project, charity, etc. worth being associated with. § You might want to describe the event’s history with an aim toward showing growth in numbers, growth in participation, growth in sponsorship, and consistency in reaching a desirable demographic target: e.g., In 2008 HAM Fest went to 22 key markets presenting, music, cultural events, and opportunities for marketing to over 880,000 fans of Happy Music and Happy Culture. § HAM Fest 2009 will go to 31 markets promising a total reach of 1.2 million Happy Music, Happy Culture fans presenting unprecedented opportunity to market to this desirable demographic. § Past sponsors include: Big Record Company, Inc., Happy Cola Company, Large Cell Phone Service Provider, Cool Clothing Designer, Super Energy Drinks, and Wicked Awesome Sneaker, Co.
  22. 22. History Provide a bit of background showing the history of the event: “The HAM Fest was started to represent, speak to and capitalize on the emergent Happy Culture. In the late 1990s, we realized grunge had come and gone. People were looking for cheery festivals. Morose was out, and happy was in. We saw a community of fans, artists and an emerging youth culture. We capitalized on the opportunity.” - Happy Rich Guy (Founder HAM Fest)
  23. 23. Testimonials Provide Testimonials from past sponsors and past participants of note. “We came in as a Tier 1 sponsor with HAM Fest in 2008. We saw a marked increase in interest and brand recognition among Happy Music enthusiasts age 18-25, a group we wouldn’t have otherwise reached.” – Suzan Bigbucks (VP Branding, Happy Cola Company) “We jumped on the HAM Fest juggernaut in 2001. Since then we’ve seen a three-fold increase in core sales. Prior to HAM Fest, we sold mostly left-footed shoes but had no luck with right. Tier 1 Prosciutto Level sponsorship changed that.” – Rubber Souls McGinty (Founder, Wicked Awesome Sneaker, Co.)
  24. 24. Testimonials Provide Testimonials from past sponsors and past participants of note. “We came in as a Tier 1 sponsor with HAM Fest in 2008. We saw a marked increase in interest and brand recognition among Happy Music enthusiasts age 18-25, a group we wouldn’t have otherwise reached.” – Suzan Bigbucks (VP Branding, Happy Cola Company) “We jumped on the HAM Fest juggernaut in 2001. Since then we’ve seen a three-fold increase in core sales. Prior to HAM Fest, we sold mostly left-footed shoes but had no luck with right. Tier 1 Prosciutto Level sponsorship changed that.” – Rubber Souls McGinty (Founder, Wicked Awesome Sneaker, Co.)
  25. 25. Demographics Happy Music Fans: §  18 - 25 years old §  Number over 35 million §  Born in the 80s, came into consciousness in the 90s, established their own buying habits in the new millennium §  Define themselves through purchase of Happy Music, Happy Clothing, Happy Soft drinks, and Happy lifestyle products and services §  Active Consumers of Happy Culture and related lifestyle products § Spend nearly $ 90 million a year on music, clothing, soft drinks § Provide any other relevant demographic data that convinces potential sponsors that buying in at any level provides quantifiable benefits
  26. 26. HAM Fest 2009 Happy Artist The Cheery Cheerios The Smiling Satisfaction Transaction Smiley Smith Joan Joyous Glee Club Convoy
  27. 27. HAM Fest 2009 Dates List all festival dates List all festival markets Provide any market specific information Note if dates are tentative
  28. 28. HAM Fest 2009 SPONSORSHIP PLATFORMS Tier 1: Prosciutto Sponsor Tier 2: Jamon Sponsor Tier 3: Candied Ham Sponsor Tier 4: SPAM sponsor
  29. 29. HAM Fest 2009 SPONSORSHIP PLATFORMS Tier 1: Prosciutto Sponsor Tier 2: Jamon Sponsor Tier 3: Candied Ham Sponsor Tier 4: SPAM sponsor
  30. 30. HAM Fest 2009 Prosciutto Sponsor §  Exclusivity in category §  Logo / marks prominently featured in all HAM Fest print materials, signage, ads, and collateral §  Official product / service designation §  Presence and access to hospitality suites at all stops §  Entrance signage §  On-stage signage §  Program book ad § On-line presence at hamfest.com § Branding on official tour merchandise § Radio broadcast tags § Tickets to key tour stop § ID / tag in media buy § On-site sampling § On-site sales rights § Mailing lists § PA announcements § Tags in all local TV / radio broadcasts
  31. 31. HAM Fest 2009 Jamon Sponsor §  Logo / marks featured in select HAM Fest print materials, signage, ads, and collateral §  Presence and access to hospitality suites at select stops §  On-site signage §  Program book ad § On-line presence at hamfest.com § Tickets to key tour stop § On-site sampling § On-site sales rights § Access to select mailing lists § PA announcements § Tags in all local TV / radio broadcasts
  32. 32. HAM Fest 2009 Candied Ham Sponsor §  Logo / marks featured in select HAM Fest signage, ads, and collateral §  Access to hospitality suites at select stops §  On-site signage § On-line presence at hamfest.com § One time email blast § PA announcements
  33. 33. HAM Fest 2009 Candied Ham Sponsor §  Logo / marks featured in select HAM Fest signage, ads, and collateral §  Access to hospitality suites at select stops §  On-site signage § On-line presence at hamfest.com § One time email blast § PA announcements
  34. 34. Contact §  For sponsorship opportunities, contact: §  Samantha Smiley at: §  HAM Fest 2008 §  PO Box 123 Ebullientville, NY 12341 (212) 333-4444 ssmiley@hamfest.com
  35. 35. Chapter 2: Terms Headliner Support Act Billboard/Pollstar General Admission Reserved Seats Comps Scaling Gold Circle Merch House Rate Royalty Percentage Roi (return on Investment) Sponsorship Deck Sinage
  36. 36. Chapter 3: Why, When, and Where to Tour Preproduction Phase-before capital is invested in gear and other costs Benefits of the tour can be maximized. The tam will map out the tour to fully realize venues and exposure. Plotting a tour is a process that starts with the act and it’s team. As long as a year in advance Plot out objectives Key Factors-album release, tv exposure, tour announcement, on-sale tour launch, routing.
  37. 37. Chapter 3: Why to tour Promote album sales Sell Merch Build fan Base Attract Labels For most groups signed to a label, touring is tied into a release date of an album to capitalize on exposure, radio play, and the labels marketing muscle. Priorities are to: Create and Event Make Money Have Fun
  38. 38. Chapter 3: Touring to Promote Album sales Parallel business Create a buzz In-stores Sponsors Touring to Make Money All tours should be profitable There is no shame in playing for the money Heritage Groups Touring to Build the fan base
  39. 39. Chapter 3: When to Tour Big name artists can dictate tour dates. Headliner Billed C0-headling situations Availability New Release Radio or TV exposure Penetrate secondary Markets Buzz-Plays Timing the on-sales with radio play
  40. 40. Chapter 3: Touring Traffic To much touring traffic can be problematic Most concert activity occurs between April and September Acts should be cognizant of how often they play a given market A general rule of thumb is every 16 months to 2 years The right venue the right time Arenas theatres and clubs tend to be busier in winter. Playing on-offs one-offs are rare radio shows Payola Corporate Shows Sell-out
  41. 41. Chapter 3: Art of the On-Sale On-sale or going-up (tickets available to the public) Two strategies Put tickets on sale early Wait until a few weeks out to create a sense of urgency Where to tour-Determining Markets Where to Tour Determining Markets Secondary and Tertiary Markets Anchor Dates Building the fan base Partnering with other groups Skynyrd & 3 doors down-neither group played their best markets
  42. 42. Chapter 3: Determining which venue to play The type of venue is largely determined by the amount of tickets that can be sold. Another important factor is venue aesthetics A general rule of thumb is that production tends to work better in a controlled room Some groups sell their music as a party and create lifestyle events that fit better in “sheds” Some groups need more reserved seating than GA Sometimes there is a stigma attached to certain types of events?
  43. 43. Chapter 3: Routing the Tour The type of venue is largely determined by the amount of tickets that can be sold. Another important factor is venue aesthetics A general rule of thumb is that production tends to work better in a controlled room Some groups sell their music as a party and create lifestyle events that fit better in “sheds” Some groups need more reserved seating than GA Sometimes there is a stigma attached to certain types of events? Avails-Second or third hold. Smaller acts can move more quickly Compare a historic venue to a new one.
  44. 44. Chapter 3: Terms Preproduction phase In-stores Heritage acts Headliner Billed Buzz plays Touring traffic One-off Radio show Payola On-sales Going up Secondary market Anchor date shed avails second third hold
  45. 45. Chapter 4: Budgeting You need to create a plan. A budget is one of the MOST important parts of that plan. Projecting Income Ticket sales Merch Sponsorship Other? The goal is to tap as many potential revenue sources as possible. Projecting income is more difficult that estimating expenses because there is less control.
  46. 46. Chapter 4: Budgeting Ticket Sales Fees paid to an artist for performance but the talent buyer are know as ticket sales. Guaranteed Flat Fee Percentage of ticket sales (door) Combination of the two If percentage deals are requested the band will want to suggest realistic ticket prices. “Priors”-are published weekly in Billboard and Pollstar Venue Priors Flat fees are known as Guarantees or “flats” The percentage a band receives is called the “back end”
  47. 47. Chapter 4: Budgeting Ticket Sales The risk in a straight percentage deal is that the ticket sales is unknown. Most groups will try to remove some of the risk by negotiating a minimum versus as percentage, whichever is greater. This is commonly known as the “versus deal”. Merch Sales-measured per capata or “per cap” Set up boundaries for expenses Variables Costs-hard to predict
  48. 48. Chapter 4: Your Budget Create a detailed Budget for your event by next week. Income Ticket Sales Merch Sponsorship Expenses Artist fees Sound Rental Sound Person Personnel Budgeted 450 Projected 382(85% TS) 20 0 ($50 paid by club) Actual Delta
  49. 49. Chapter 4: Terms Fee Structures Priors Flats Back end Gross Potential Deductions House Rate Per Cap Impressions See pg 60 Production reimbursement Variable costs-running expenses
  50. 50. Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers A talent buyer is the person or company who pays an act or artist to perform. The size and scope of talent buyers is very diverse. Concert Promoters National & International Promoters College Buyers Club Buyers Venue and PAC Fair and Festival Casio Private
  51. 51. Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers Hard Ticket Buyers Hard ticket buyers primary revenue stream is selling tickets. Hard ticket buyers are commonly referred to as Concert Promoters. Evolution of the Concert Promotion Business Since colonial times Big Band Era True beginnings in 1950’s with Rock and Roll Large packages with hit bands of the day 1960’s- Bill Graham Attending Concerts became one of the primary entertainment choices for the youth culture. 1980’s Promoters tired of watching the venues capture all the ancillary revenue began building their own amphitheatre.
  52. 52. Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers 1990’s –All types of business begin to consolidate. Robert Sillerman begins buying up regional concert promoters. 2000 Sillerman sells SFX to clear channel 2005 CCE spun off its live entertainment business creating the independent entertainment giant Live Nation 2006 Live Nation owns 153 Venues worldwide Produces 28,000 events annually
  53. 53. Chapter 9: Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers The promoter pays the act usually through an agent. The promoter agree to promote the show through whatever means necessary. Box office proceeds traditionally go 15% to the promoter and 85% to the act-this is negotiable. From the promoter share come expenses-promotion, production fees, hall rental, catering, any other costs. Some have estimated the promoters profit margin at 1% National & International Buyers Deep pocketed corporate promoters with a presence in multiple markets. Can build an advantage by cross-collateralizing across the tour. May partner with local promoters College Buyers Student run campus entertainment buying association May partner with local promoters-Sig. cost savings
  54. 54. Chapter 9: Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers Large Venue Buyers Many times the venue and the talent buyer are one and the same. Club buyers, arenas, theaters, ballrooms, PAC. Club Buyers Venues have played an undeniable role in launching many artist career. The club circuit remains an important vestige of the traditional touring model. Promoters take chances on new acts in hopes that they will remember the promoter if they are successful. Clubs can offer better pay because the overhead is less. Some groups are just better in clubs. PAC Most have in-house talent buyers
  55. 55. Chapter 9: Chapter 9: Types of Talent Buyers Festivals & Fairs Some of the most established buyers in North America. Some are Hard ticket buyers some derive ancillary income streams. Casino Buyers Have become more diverse. Baby boomer demographic. Private Buyers One of the fastest growing segments of live industry Often will partner with an experienced promoter
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