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Social Networks Webinar
 

Social Networks Webinar

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These are the slides for my API social networks webinar for the Minnesota Newspaper Foundation, part of the Upholding and Updating Ethical Standards series of journalism ethics seminars.

These are the slides for my API social networks webinar for the Minnesota Newspaper Foundation, part of the Upholding and Updating Ethical Standards series of journalism ethics seminars.

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  • For links to the handouts for this webinar and other workshops in the Upholding and Updating Ethical Standards series, read my blog: http://stevebuttry.wordpress.com/2009/08/29/resources-for-journalism-educators-on-digital-ethics-new-business-models-journalism/
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    Social Networks Webinar Social Networks Webinar Presentation Transcript

    • Upholding and Updating Ethical Standards Steve Buttry, API and Gazette Communications Minnesota Newspaper Association webinar, April 1, 2009 Supported by a grant from the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation © 2008 The American Press Institute. All rights reserved.
    • Ethics seminars for journalists  We can bring this seminar to your newsroom  One or two-day seminars focused on ethical challenges related to innovation  Heavily subsidized, host pays nominal fee plus meals and lodging  Contact me or Elaine Clisham, eclisham@americanpressinstitute.org 2
    • Remember time-tested ethical principles Seek truth and report it Minimize harm Act independently Be accountable SPJ Code of Ethics 3
    • Remember time-tested ethical principles Seek truth and report it as fully as possible Act independently Minimize harm “Guiding Principles for the Journalist,” Bob Steele, Poynter Institute 4
    • Questions to guide ethical decisions 1. What do I know? What do I need to know? 2. What is my journalistic purpose? 3. What are my ethical concerns? 4. What policies and professional guidelines should I consider? 5. How can I include other people, with different perspectives and diverse ideas, in the decision-making process? 6. Who are the stakeholders? What are their motivations? Which are legitimate? 7. What if the roles were reversed? How would I feel if I were in the shoes of one of the stakeholders? 8. What are the possible consequences of my actions? 9. What are my alternatives to maximize my truthtelling responsibility and minimize harm? 10. Can I clearly and fully justify my thinking and my decision? 5
    • Questions for exercises Premise for exercises: You are the top editor of your news organization Questions for exercises:  What do you to about this right now?  What to you to do to address any issues this incident raises for the future?  How, if at all, do you deal with this issue publicly? 6
    • Facebook Fiasco Your publisher chairs a committee pushing to build a new high school. Parents are upset about overcrowding at the existing school(s). A taxpayer group says the new school would be a boondoggle. Your education reporter is immersed in the issue and you are pleased with the balance and depth of your coverage in print and online. The publisher has been keeping a proper distance, but you push for heavy coverage because of the importance of the issue. A blog on the taxpayer group’s web site reveals that the education reporter has been blogging about her assignments on her Facebook page. While she uses a pseudonym, the photos are clearly her and she is complaining about specific assignments she covered for you, wondering if the pressure for more coverage, which she is feeling from you, really comes from the publisher. The taxpayer group blog trumpets this as proof that your coverage is slanted. 7
    • Facebook fiasco  What do you to about this right now?  What to you to do to address any issues this incident raises for the future?  How, if at all, do you deal with this issue publicly? 8
    • Facebook fiasco The plot thickens: You check the reporter’s MySpace page, where she uses her real name. No blog there, but the language is foul and the photos include one where she appears to be smoking a joint. 9
    • Facebook fiasco  What do you to about this right now?  What to you to do to address any issues this incident raises for the future?  How, if at all, do you deal with this issue publicly? 10
    • Twitterdentity crisis Two of your reporters write a story about how a local bank is affected by the upheaval in the banking industry. The story in this morning’s paper says your paper “had an interview set with” the bank president, but he didn’t return a call to finalize the interview. The story says a reporter instead asked questions during a live chat the banker hosted on the bank’s web site. You get an email from the banker, who says he never had an interview set with your staff. The banker’s email includes screen shots of a Twitter direct-message exchange. The reporter messaged the banker: “Are you available for sit down interview on Tuesday re: future of banking?” The banker’s response the next morning was: “Yes, I’m available from 1:30 to 2:30 today or after 4:30. Who are you and what is the interview for (publication, broadcast, blog, class)?” The banker noted that the reporter did not answer the question. The banker’s email also includes a link to the reporter’s Twitter page, which has no bio and no mention of your organization. The banker says he never had an interview set with the reporter. 11
    • Twitterdentity crisis  What do you to about this right now?  What to you to do to address any issues this incident raises for the future?  How, if at all, do you deal with this issue publicly? 12
    • Twitterdentity crisis The plot thickens: When you talk with the reporter, he says that many of his tweets discuss his work for your newspaper, asking for potential sources for stories he’s working on, linking to stories as they’re posted to the web, etc. Even though he didn’t fill in a bio, he presumed that someone who followed him would know he worked for the paper. You check his Twitter stream and it’s true that he does tweet about work a lot, including unflattering tweets about sources. In one tweet, in fact, he tweeted that the banker “said yes to an interview but apparently doesn’t know what yes means.” When you meet with the banker, he also shows you that when your reporter joined his live chat, he used his real name to pose questions to the banker but never identified himself as a reporter for your newspaper. 13
    • Twitterdentity crisis  What do you to about this right now?  What to you to do to address any issues this incident raises for the future?  How, if at all, do you deal with this issue publicly? 14
    • Ethics in social networks  Decide whether to separate personal, professional profiles  Always identify yourself as a journalist in any professional profile or message  Discuss social networking practices with your editor/staff  Be sure to verify identity if using sources from social networks 15
    • Ethics in social networks  Regard anything you say in a social network as published information  Always conduct yourself professionally in social networks  Discuss with editor/staff what kind of groups/friends are acceptable  Discuss social media boundaries with your editor/staff 16
    • Upholding and Updating Ethical Standards Steve Buttry, API and Gazette Communications Minnesota Newspaper Association webinar, April 1, 2009 Supported by a grant from the Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation © 2008 The American Press Institute. All rights reserved.