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Design-driven innovation
Two models in
practice

Steve Baty
Meld Studios
Design in innovation

“In terms of practice, design’s core value is in rapidly synthesising
disparate bodies of knowledge ...
Design intent

Steve Baty
Insight-led

Hypothesis-led

Steve Baty
Insight-led Innovation

Steve Baty
Customer
research

Steve Baty
Go look; watch; listen
listen

Steve Baty
Synthesis

Steve Baty
Understand the drivers

Steve Baty
Multiple Concepts

Steve Baty
Generate
concepts

Steve Baty
Make concepts
tangible

Steve Baty
Evaluate with customers

Steve Baty
Test; learn; refine;
repeat.

Steve Baty
Evaluate with customers

Steve Baty
‘Build’

Steve Baty
Hypothesis-led innovation

Steve Baty
Hypothesis about people

Steve Baty
Steve Baty
Design sprint

Steve Baty
Design
sprint

Steve Baty
Development sprint

Steve Baty
Test hypothesis

Steve Baty
Steve Baty
Development sprint

Steve Baty
Test
again

Steve Baty
Constant beta

mailbox app
Steve Baty
Dome
Coffees

Steve Baty
Steve Baty
Steve Baty
Thank you

Steve Baty
@docbaty
steve@meldstudios.com.au
www.meldstudios.com.au
@wearemeld
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Two models of design-driven innovation - UX Australia

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The drive for innovation in products and services and a culture of ‘fail early; fail often’ has bred a desire for very early prototypes. This approach lends itself to an entire industry tackling a problem or for the venture capitalists funding them. It can be broadly characterised as hypothesis-led. It is much less appropriate or advantageous for an individual project team within an established industry attempting to reinvent an existing product/service category. For these teams, an insight-led approach in which multiple concepts are developed in parallel is more appropriate.

This presentation will give an introduction to each of these two dominant models of design-driven innovation. It will look at the advantages and disadvantages of each; and look at the issue of localised optimal solutions and what this means for innovation.

Published in: Design, Technology, Business
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  • This is interesting Steve - I actually think you can use a mix of both models to great success...it doesn't always need to be so black and white. How do I know? A mix of both these models is how we built (and continue to evolve features) within our app Cook (@theCookapp).
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  • Identify behaviours, motivators, contextual factors
    - get out of the building; observe; use open questions
    - don’t constrain the research before you’ve begun
  • Understand the drivers for the observed behaviours.
    Dig for significant insights;
    Don’t be satisfied with superficial explanations.
    Make cognitive leaps.
    Connect disparate dots.
  • Be bold
    Ask challenging questions
    Give yourself permission, for just a few minutes, to ask “What if...” and see where it takes you
    Target fundamentals and challenge the assumptions that shape your industry.
  • Make concepts tangible. Tell a story visually.
    For a concept like a business model, making it tangible can overcome initial reactions of rejection (especially when you’re countering established practice).
  • Sketch. Explore many concepts cheaply. Critique them based on your objectives.
    Keep the ones that work; throw out the ones that don’t.
    Volume protects against anchoring and ‘local optimums’.
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
  • Sketch. Explore many concepts cheaply. Critique them based on your objectives.
    Keep the ones that work; throw out the ones that don’t.
    Volume protects against anchoring and ‘local optimums’.
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
  • Sketch. Explore many concepts cheaply. Critique them based on your objectives.
    Keep the ones that work; throw out the ones that don’t.
    Volume protects against anchoring and ‘local optimums’.
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
  • Other versions? Intel’s Experience Research Lab...
  • Key moments
  • http://www.designstaff.org/articles/product-design-sprint-2012-10-02.html
    Also other incubator programs at Citrix; Singapore; Sydney...
  • Transcript of "Two models of design-driven innovation - UX Australia"

    1. 1. Design-driven innovation Two models in practice Steve Baty Meld Studios
    2. 2. Design in innovation “In terms of practice, design’s core value is in rapidly synthesising disparate bodies of knowledge in order to articulate, prototype and develop alternative strategies.” - Dan Hill, Dark Matter and Trojan Horses: A Strategic Design Vocabulary
    3. 3. Design intent Steve Baty
    4. 4. Insight-led Hypothesis-led Steve Baty
    5. 5. Insight-led Innovation Steve Baty
    6. 6. Customer research Steve Baty
    7. 7. Go look; watch; listen listen Steve Baty
    8. 8. Synthesis Steve Baty
    9. 9. Understand the drivers Steve Baty
    10. 10. Multiple Concepts Steve Baty
    11. 11. Generate concepts Steve Baty
    12. 12. Make concepts tangible Steve Baty
    13. 13. Evaluate with customers Steve Baty
    14. 14. Test; learn; refine; repeat. Steve Baty
    15. 15. Evaluate with customers Steve Baty
    16. 16. ‘Build’ Steve Baty
    17. 17. Hypothesis-led innovation Steve Baty
    18. 18. Hypothesis about people Steve Baty
    19. 19. Steve Baty
    20. 20. Design sprint Steve Baty
    21. 21. Design sprint Steve Baty
    22. 22. Development sprint Steve Baty
    23. 23. Test hypothesis Steve Baty
    24. 24. Steve Baty
    25. 25. Development sprint Steve Baty
    26. 26. Test again Steve Baty
    27. 27. Constant beta mailbox app Steve Baty
    28. 28. Dome Coffees Steve Baty
    29. 29. Steve Baty
    30. 30. Steve Baty
    31. 31. Thank you Steve Baty @docbaty steve@meldstudios.com.au www.meldstudios.com.au @wearemeld
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