AssetLabs
The following document is authored by Steve O’Halloran – the co-founder of AssetMetrix (now owned by
Microsoft C...
Usage Analysis & Risks
of unsupported Operating Systems:
Microsoft® Windows® 95 & Windows® 98
Executive Summary:
      On ...
Of the 538 companies, Win9X accounted for 39.2% of the operating systems found,
              with a standard deviation of...
Understanding the risks associated with Windows 9X

The largest potential risk to corporations using Windows95 and Windows...
The Lifecycle of Microsoft Windows 98 vs. other ‘Windows’
Windows 98 was introduced on June 30th, 1998 (Windows 98-SE intr...
Dataset Parameters

     AssetMetrix Research Labs conducted a statistical analysis of the Microsoft Windows 95 and
     W...
Data Analysis:
Overall Operating System popularity
                                                                       ...
Conclusion: Smaller companies tended to have an average Win9X population size of 30%, with
larger companies tending to hav...
3. Win9X retained due to hardware form factor constraints

       Until the introduction of Windows XP in
       December ...
Commentary

The pervasiveness of Windows 9X appears to be an artifact of companies retaining their hardware (both
desktops...
Addendum 1:
     Microsoft Products ending Extended Support for
     Dec 2003 - Jan 2004


                               ...
Addendum 2:
Microsoft Products ending Mainstream Support for
Dec 2003 - Jan 2004
Product Name
 General Availability Date
   Mainstream Support
         Retired
Extended Support Retired

CD Photo Viewer V...
Disclaimer

The information contained in this document represents the current view of AssetMetrix, Inc.
(“AssetMetrix”) on...
About AssetMetrix

    Founded in 2000 and headquartered in Ottawa, Canada, AssetMetrix is the industry’s first
    manage...
Asset Metrix Win98 Analysis    Asset Labs Edition
Asset Metrix Win98 Analysis    Asset Labs Edition
Asset Metrix Win98 Analysis    Asset Labs Edition
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Asset Metrix Win98 Analysis Asset Labs Edition

  1. 1. AssetLabs The following document is authored by Steve O’Halloran – the co-founder of AssetMetrix (now owned by Microsoft Corporation).mailto:steve@Assetlabs.com?subject=Windows 95/98 documentThis docuem Re-distribution rights have been allowed via a legal arrangement between Mr. O’Halloran and AssetMetrix. AssetMetrix – now owned by Microsoft Corporation - remains the holder of Copyright of the following document. Other AssetMetrix ‘Research Labs’ documents can be found at www.AssetLabs.com
  2. 2. Usage Analysis & Risks of unsupported Operating Systems: Microsoft® Windows® 95 & Windows® 98 Executive Summary: On January 16th, 2004, Microsoft® Windows® 98 enters the ‘non-support’ portion of its support lifecycle. Windows 98 is considered obsolete, and security based hotfixes will not be generally available for users of Windows 98 or Windows 98-SE. With the high trend of security exploits (viruses, worms, trojans, etc.) against Microsoft Windows and associated applications, and with Microsoft’s increased efforts to patch security exploits via monthly hotfixes, companies with ‘Internet-facing’ PCs installed with Windows 95 or Windows 98 face an ever-increasing risk of security breach for their entire network throughout 2004 and beyond. Analysis indicates that a high level of Windows 98 (and Windows 95) retention is most likely an artifact of attempts to extend the lifecycle of ‘pre-Y2K’ PCs during the 2001 economic slow-down, and that this decision to continue to use PCs with 1999-based components restrained corporations from migrating away from a Win9X environment. Companies with a significant investment in Windows 98 – and who did not purchase an extended hotfix support contract in summer 2003 - should immediately evaluate strategies to retire all installations of Windows 98. Statistical Synopsis AssetMetrix Research Labs conducted a statistical analysis of Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows 98 operating systems from 670 corporations ranging in size from 10 to 49,000 employees, representing a total of 372,129 PCs. 80.2% (538 of the 670) of the companies had at least one instance of Windows 95 or 98, with no correlation between company size and Win95/98 presence (referred to from here on as ‘Win9X’).
  3. 3. Of the 538 companies, Win9X accounted for 39.2% of the operating systems found, with a standard deviation of 31.3%. Such a high standard deviation suggests a wide variance of Win9X, from as low as 10% to as high as 70% (as can be seen in the statistics sections). Index Understanding the risks associated with Windows 9X ..................................................................................4 Other risks associated to loss of Windows 98 support Even for Windows 98 PCs that are completely protected from the Internet, the cost of support rises – both in time and money - as the Windows 98 knowledgebase of support personnel diminishes over time. Any mission critical application or job function that is running on/through a Windows 98 PC is at an increased risk of returning to ‘uptime’ - and an increased chance of data loss - as Windows 98 skill set diminishes over time. ..........................................................................................................................................................................4 Understanding Microsoft’s Lifecycle Support Policy....................................................................................4 Dataset Parameters..........................................................................................................................................7 Data Privacy....................................................................................................................................................7 Data Analysis:..................................................................................................................................................8 Overall Operating System popularity.......................................................................................................8 Distribution of Win9X across Company Size...........................................................................................8 Trends Analysis...........................................................................................................................................8 Factors leading to Win9X ‘retention’ ............................................................................................................9 1. Fiscal measures to reduce costs in 2001 cause retention of ‘Pre-Y2K’ Hardware..........................9 2. Win9X maintained on older PCs due to hardware component constraints.....................................9 3. Win9X retained due to hardware form factor constraints..............................................................10 Commentary ..................................................................................................................................................11 Suggestions....................................................................................................................................................11 Addendum 1: Microsoft Products ending Extended Support for Dec 2003 - Jan 2004 ........................................................................................................................................................................12 Addendum 2: Microsoft Products ending Mainstream Support for Dec 2003 - Jan 2004 ........................................................................................................................................................................14 Disclaimer......................................................................................................................................................17 About AssetMetrix.........................................................................................................................................18 About AssetMetrix Research Labs................................................................................................................18
  4. 4. Understanding the risks associated with Windows 9X The largest potential risk to corporations using Windows95 and Windows98 is the probability of an Internet-based security exploit being discovered after January 2004 that can affect a Windows 9X PC. Typically, security exploits –due to a code issue within the Operating System and/or the Internet Browser – are reviewed and remedied by Microsoft via their monthly hotfix releases. After January 2004, Microsoft is no longer obligated to supply any security based Hotfixes for Windows 98 users. Thus, Windows 98 users become increasingly prone to any new security exploits, as security patches may not be supplied. Virus authors & hackers will certainly view any Windows 98 PC as a more vulnerable entry-point into the network infrastructure, being able to exploit security holes that have been subsequently ‘patched’ on PCs with Windows 2000, Windows XP, etc. As time progresses – and the number of security exploits increases – any Internet-facing Windows 98 PC increases its vulnerability –and opportunity - to attack. Other risks associated to loss of Windows 98 support Even for Windows 98 PCs that are completely protected from the Internet, the cost of support rises – both in time and money - as the Windows 98 knowledgebase of support personnel diminishes over time. Any mission critical application or job function that is running on/through a Windows 98 PC is at an increased risk of returning to ‘uptime’ - and an increased chance of data loss - as Windows 98 skill set diminishes over time. Understanding Microsoft’s Lifecycle Support Policy For Business software, Microsoft has three distinct phases for support.1 (1) Mainstream support includes all the support options and programs that customers receive today, such as no- charge incident support, paid incident support, support charged on an hourly basis, support for warranty claims, and hotfix support. After Mainstream support ends, Extended support will be offered for Business and Development software. (2) Extended support includes all paid support options, as well as security-related hotfix support which is provided at no charge. Non-security related hotfix support requires a separate Extended Hotfix Support contract to be purchased within 90 days after Mainstream support ends. Microsoft will not accept requests for warranty support, design changes, or new features during the Extended support phase. 3) Self-help online support is available for minimum of eight years after the product is released. By using Microsoft’s online Knowledge Base articles, FAQs, troubleshooting tools, and other resources, many customers can quickly resolve their issues without contacting Microsoft directly. 1 Microsoft Website: http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx?scid=fh;[ln];lifecycle
  5. 5. The Lifecycle of Microsoft Windows 98 vs. other ‘Windows’ Windows 98 was introduced on June 30th, 1998 (Windows 98-SE introduced one year later) and is based upon the ‘Win32’ architecture of Windows 95 (originating from DOS & Windows 3.X), whereas Windows 2000 and Windows XP are based upon the WinNT architecture (with origins from OS/2 development; see chart below). As such, Windows 98 is the last business-based ‘Win32’ OS remaining on the market (Windows ME is a consumer based OS). Originally, Windows 98 end of Extended Support was slated for June 30th, 2003, but was extended by Microsoft – in June 2003 – to January 16th, 2004, most probably in response to large corporate customers who had yet to retire their Windows 98 platforms. Rather than offering Extended Support for Windows 98 from June 2003 to June 2005 (two years after Mainstream support phase, Microsoft is terminating the extended support phase for both Windows 98 and Windows 98 SE on January 2004, and will consider those products as obsolete.
  6. 6. Dataset Parameters AssetMetrix Research Labs conducted a statistical analysis of the Microsoft Windows 95 and Windows98 operating systems sample size of 670 corporations ranging in size from 10 to 49,000 employees. Inventories of the 670-company sample were conducted within the last 14 months, and represent 372,129 PCs from companies in almost every market sector including: • Financial • Communications • Government • Healthcare • Services • Transportation • Utilities 80.2% (538 of the 670) of the companies had at least one instance of Windows 95 or Windows 98, with no correlation between company size and Win95/98 presence (referred to from here on as ‘Win9X’). Of the 538 companies, Win9X accounted for 39.2 % of the operating systems found, with a standard deviation of 31.3%. Such a high standard deviation is not from a small sampling but rather from a truly wide variance of Win9X, from as low as 10% to as high as 70% (as can be seen in the statistics sections). Data Privacy Corporate participants in this survey are protected by AssetMetrix’s strict privacy and confidentiality policy. Data used by AssetMetrix Research Labs was blindly aggregated to prevent any identification of a company and/or any end-user identifiers.
  7. 7. Data Analysis: Overall Operating System popularity OS Popularity From the entire dataset, Windows 98 and Windows 95 accounted for more than 27% of Win NT4 the OS type, including companies that had no 13.3% Win XP 6.6% Windows 98 installations at all Win 95 Windows 2000 was the dominant Operating Win 9X 14.7% System, consisting of 54.6% of the OS type. In 27.2% Win 98 2nd place was the Win9X category, exceeding 12.5% Win 2000 27%. 52.6% Win ME 0.2% Surprisingly, there are more installations of either Windows 95 or Windows 98 than Windows XP. Windows XP – introduced by Microsoft in Dec 2001 – accounted for less than 7% of the install base. This data may suggest that corporations are currently tending to upgrade to Windows 2000 rather than Windows XP. Conclusion: The popularity of Win9X (27.2%) is second only to Windows 2000 (52.6%) Distribution of Win9X across Company Size AssetMetrix Research Lab analyses Win9X installations vs. Company Size determined no apparent correlation between company size and Win9X usage; larger 100.0% companies tended to have the same 80.0% distribution range of Win9X as smaller % of Win9X companies. 60.0% 40.0% As seen on the X-Y scatter plot on the right, 20.0% larger companies are just as apt to have a significant Win9X install base as smaller 0.0% companies. 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 3500 4000 4500 5000 5500 6000 Company Size Conclusion: There is no significant correlation to company size and the magnitude of Win9X; larger companies can have significant installations of Win9X Trends Analysis Average Win9X install vs. Company Size By placing the company data into quantile ranges of 100’s (i.e. 100 to 200, 200 to 300, 70.0% etc.), Win9X averages were produced from 60.0% each subset. Overall, there was a slight trend 50.0% Win9X install (%) of the average Win9X install to decrease from 30% towards 20% as the company size 40.0% Avg increased (as noted in the black linear trend- 30.0% Linear (Avg) line). 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% 0 1000 2000 3000 4000 5000 Com pany Size
  8. 8. Conclusion: Smaller companies tended to have an average Win9X population size of 30%, with larger companies tending to have an average Win9X population size of 20% Factors leading to Win9X ‘retention’ On first approach, the existence of Windows 95 and Windows 98 in corporate environments is not expected for the following reasons: 1. Any company who has entered into an OS-based Microsoft VLA (Volume License Agreement) after December 2001 has the rights to install Windows XP on all PCs with a previous operating system. 2. A 3-year lifecycle would assume that PCs purchased in 2000 would be replaced with PCs pre- installed with Windows 2000 or Windows XP. 3. Customers have been aware of Microsoft’s intention to ‘retire’ Windows 98. However, with over 80% of the companies having Win9X present, and at a rate approaching 40%, there are other factors that supercede the initial logic of retiring Win9X in corporate environments. 1. Fiscal measures to reduce costs in 2001 cause retention of ‘Pre-Y2K’ Hardware 2001 saw a severe impact almost all sectors of the corporate marketplace; US GDP sank to –1.6%, and GDP Growth US PC sales decreased by 12% from the previous 6% year. In short, companies were tending not replacing their ‘old’ Win9X PCs with newer ones. 5% 4% From a suggested 3 year lifecycle perspective, the 3% economic depression in 2001 affected PCs purchased ) M F O T P D S U : E C R ( 2% in 1998 and early 1999. Not knowing the extent of this economic slowdown, many companies had opted 1% to extend the life of their ‘pre-Y2K’ PCs well into 2002. 0% -1% This fiscal restraint caused PC lifecycles to be extended to 4 or 5 years. Since the older PCs -2% offsetting the purchase of more powerful PCs that 00 01 01 02 02 00 Q4 0 00 02 02 03 03 01 01 -20 -20 -20 -20 -20 0 -20 -20 -20 -20 -20 -20 -20 -20 -20 Q2 Q1 Q4 Q1 Q4 would come pre-installed with Windows 2000 or Q1 Q3 Q2 Q3 Q2 Q3 Q1 Q2 Windows XP 2. Win9X maintained on older PCs due to hardware component constraints. In the data analysis, Win9X based PCs had a high correlation to ‘legacy’ PC hardware components (CPU, RAM and Hard Drive). PCs with Windows 9X tended to have components that were as old as Windows 95 or Windows 98. Component Win 95 Win 98 Win9X (blended) Avg CPU Speed 334 Mhz 1179 Mhz 723 Avg RAM 86 Mb 231 Mb 153 Avg Hard Drive 5548 Mb 11314 Mb 8199 330 Mhz CPUs were generally introduced by Intel Corporation between April 1998 and January 1999 (accounting for different product lines with the same CPU speed). Intel Corporation later introduced 1Ghz Desktop CPU’s in November, 2000. Thus the average age of the Win9X PCs lies between late 1998 and late 2000 (before the introduction of Windows XP). This indicates that the ‘pre-Y2K’ PC typically retained its original configuration, and thus was limited to maintaining the original Windows 95/98 rather than upgrading to Windows 2000 or XP.
  9. 9. 3. Win9X retained due to hardware form factor constraints Until the introduction of Windows XP in December 2001, Windows 98 was considered OS & Form factor # % the OS of choice for mobile PCs; both NT4 and Win95 Desktops 25438 84.9% Windows2000 had many ‘mobile’ incompatibility issues that weren’t addressed in Win95 Mobile 4523 15.1% the “NT” architecture. Win98 Desktops 33484 78.2% Win98 Mobile 9321 21.8% As such, migrating a mobile over to Windows 2000 or Windows NT was typically avoided, and many of those mobiles aren’t effectively powerful enough to use Windows XP today. Mobile Popularity (% of all PC sales) Being relatively ‘fixed’ in their component 26.0% structure, Mobile PCs are less flexible in 25.0% 25.0% accommodating future Operating 24.0% 23.8% Systems. The combination of the 23.0% increasing popularity of Mobiles (see 22.0% 22.3% 21.8% chart on right) along with resistance to 21.0% % use Windows 2000, resulted in another 20.0% 20.0% factor to have ‘pre-Y2K’ mobiles retain 19.0% 18.2% their original Win9X operating system. 18.0% 17.6% 17.0% 16.0% Q2-1998 Q1-2000 Q4-2001 Q1-1998 Q3-1998 Q4-1998 Q1-1999 Q2-1999 Q3-1999 Q4-1999 Q2-2000 Q3-2000 Q4-2000 Q1-2001 Q2-2001 Q3-2001 Q1-2002 Q2-2002 Q3-2002 Q4-2002 Q1-2003
  10. 10. Commentary The pervasiveness of Windows 9X appears to be an artifact of companies retaining their hardware (both desktops and mobiles) purchased for the Y2K-migration in 1999 and early 2000. The significant presence of Windows 95 and Windows 98 is a sign that companies have been holding onto original hardware purchased during ‘pre-Y2K’ and thus have also been holding onto the original Operating System. The retention of older PCs has prevented most companies from replacing their Win9X operating systems with more robust Operating systems (Windows 2000, Windows XP). The seamless interoperability between WIN9X and WINNT based operating systems – both at a desktop and at a network management level – has led to the ‘acceptance’ of Windows98 in a corporate environment. From an internal network management perspective, the ability to manage both Win9X PCs and WINNT-based PCs (Windows NT, 2000 & XP) is effectively seamless. Also seamless is the interoperability of Office applications between Win9X and WinNT Operating systems, as all editions of Microsoft Office (except Office 2003) can operate on Windows98. Windows 98 has not been a management issue with respect to application functionality or network management. As of January 2004, security should become the dominant determination to the continuation of Windows 98 in the corporate environment. Suggestions 1.) Ensure that all PCs – regardless of the OS - have the latest Microsoft Security Hotfixes 2.) Identify the magnitude of Windows95 and Windows98 in your corporation via a PC inventory 3.) Any Windows9X based PC with access to the Internet (including mobiles that leave the company network) should be candidates for migrating to Windows XP or Windows 2000. 4.) Determine if installations of Windows 2000 or Windows XP is covered under a Microsoft VLA 5.) Determine if any PC candidates require any RAM or HD upgrades, or requiring a new PC altogether. 6.) Based upon the age of your non-Win9X PCs and the number of new PCs required, determine if new PCs should be leased or purchased in order to synchronize the new PCs with your existing population.
  11. 11. Addendum 1: Microsoft Products ending Extended Support for Dec 2003 - Jan 2004 General Extended Mainstream Product Name Availability Support Support Retired Date Retired Access 97 16-Jan-1997 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 Content Replication Service Replication Service 30-Jun-1998 31-Dec-2002 1-Jan-2004 DFS 4.1 09-Oct-1997 31-Jan-2003 31-Dec-2003 Excel 97 16-Jan-1997 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 Fax Services for NTW 27-Jan-1997 31-Dec-2002 31-Dec-2003 Office 97 30-Dec-1996 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 Office 97 Developer 05-Jan-1997 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 Office 97 Professional 16-Jan-1997 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 Office 97 Small Business 16-Jan-1997 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 Office 97 Standard 16-Jan-1997 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 Outlook 98 21-Jun-1998 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 PowerPoint 97 16-Jan-1997 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 Proxy Server 2.0 25-Dec-1997 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2003 Routing and Remote Access Service 25-Aug-1997 31-Dec-2002 31-Dec-2003 Services for Netware 4.0 14-Nov-1996 31-Dec-2002 31-Dec-2003 SMS 1.2 23-Oct-1996 31-Dec-2001 31-Dec-2003 Visual SourceSafe 5.0 31-Mar-1997 31-Dec-2001 31-Dec-2003 Windows Media Encoder 7.1 on Windows Millennium Edition Not Available 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2003 Windows Media Player 6.4 on Windows XP Home Edition Not Available 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2003 Windows Media Player 6.4 on Windows Millennium Edition Not Available 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2003 Windows Media Player 7.1 on Windows Millennium Edition Not Available 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2003 Windows Media Player 9 on Windows Millennium Edition Not Available 7-Jan-2003 31-Dec-2003 WMF SDK 7.1 on Windows Millennium Edition Not Available 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2003 Word 97 16-Jan-1997 31-Aug- 2001 16-Jan-2004 Zero Admin for NT4 21-Sep-1997 31-Dec-2002 31-Dec-2003
  12. 12. Addendum 2: Microsoft Products ending Mainstream Support for Dec 2003 - Jan 2004
  13. 13. Product Name General Availability Date Mainstream Support Retired Extended Support Retired CD Photo Viewer V1 for Windows Millennium 01-Feb-2003 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2004 Exchange Server 5.0 23-May-1997 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2005 Exchange Server 5.0 Enterprise Edition 23-May-1997 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2005 Exchange Server 5.5 03-Feb-1998 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2005 Review note 1 below Exchange Server 5.5 Enterprise Edition 03-Feb-1998 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2005 Proxy Server 2.0 25-Dec-1997 31-Dec-2003 Not Applicable Windows Media Encoder 7.1 for Windows 2000 Professional 01-May-2001 31-Dec-2003 Not Applicable Windows Millennium Edition 31-Dec-2000 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2004 Windows Media Player 6.4 on Windows XP Professional Not Available 31-Dec-2003 31-Dec-2004 Windows 98 Plus! Pack 30-Sep-1997 16-Jan-2004 Not Applicable 1. Extended Hotfix support contract fees have been waived for the first
  14. 14. Disclaimer The information contained in this document represents the current view of AssetMetrix, Inc. (“AssetMetrix”) on the issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because AssetMetrix must respond to changing market conditions, it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of AssetMetrix and AssetMetrix cannot guarantee the accuracy of any information presented. This document is for informational purposes only. ASSETMETRIX MAKE NO WARRANTIES, EXPRESS OR IMPLIED, IN THIS DOCUMENT. THIS DOCUMENT SHOULD NOT BE VIEWED AS LEGAL ADVICE. AssetMetrix may have patents or pending patent applications, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights covering subject matter in this document. The furnishing of this document does not give you any license to these patents, trademarks, copyrights, or other intellectual property rights. AssetMetrix does not make any representation or warranty regarding specifications in this document or any product or item developed based on these specifications. AssetMetrix disclaims all express and implied warranties, including but not limited to the implied warranties of merchantability, fitness for a particular purpose, and freedom from infringement. Without limiting the generality of the foregoing, AssetMetrix does not make any warranty of any kind that any item developed based on these specifications, or any portion of a specification, will not infringe any copyright, patent, trade secret, or other intellectual property right of any person or entity in any country. It is your responsibility to seek licenses for such intellectual property rights where appropriate. AssetMetrix shall not be liable for any damages arising out of or in connection with the use of these specifications, including liability for lost profit, business interruption, or any other damages whatsoever. AssetMetrix, AssetAgent, AssetPulse, ServicePage, P2P-Tracker are either registered trademarks or trademarks of AssetMetrix. Windows is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation in the United States and other countries. Other product and company names herein may be the trademarks of their respective owners. Usage and/or reference of other product and/company names should not necessarily be construed as an endorsement by AssetMetrix. © 2000-2003 AssetMetrix Inc. All rights reserved.
  15. 15. About AssetMetrix Founded in 2000 and headquartered in Ottawa, Canada, AssetMetrix is the industry’s first managed service for PC inventory and IT asset analysis. AssetMetrix gives IT managers the power to discover, analyze, and manage their MS Windows & Linux desktop and server environment at the rate of 1,000 PCs per minute, regardless of location or connection. AssetMetrix discovers over 250 hardware elements, identifies and categorizes 220,000+ software titles, and reports these findings in over 150 reports, making it the most comprehensive PC inventory and asset analysis solution available today. To date, AssetMetrix is deployed in over 4,000 customer sites, and is used in the management of hundreds of thousands of seats for international resellers and service providers. For more information, please visit www.assetmetrix.com. About AssetMetrix Research Labs AssetMetrix Research Labs is the research division of AssetMetrix, and is responsible for the algorithms used within the many ’asset analysis’ reports found within AssetMetrix (i.e. Windows Migration analysis, PC Population Replacement Forecasting, License Calculators, etc.) AssetMetrix Research Labs focuses on assisting AssetMetrix clientele (and channel partners) with strategic IT Asset Management advice and solutions, and also with monitoring industry events and trends on behalf of AssetMetrix to help partners and clients keep abreast of the most pressing IT Asset Management issues. Commentary on this document is welcome. Phone: 613-244-0235 Fax: 613-236-6336 Email: ResearchLabs@AssetMetrix.com

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