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Conference program 2012

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  • 1. The P ower of ersistence Tapping into what motivates us to achieve and grow II 8th Annual Peer Learning Conference July 23 – 25, 2012 Doubletree Hotel Portland, OR National Net work
  • 2. 8th ANNUAL • PEER LEARNING CONFERENCE July 23 - 25, 2012Welcome to Portland for the 8th Annual Peer Learning Conference, The Power of Persistence II!Last year in Philadelphia, we began an exploration of persistence. This year, we extend the theme byfocusing on a concept that greatly affects our ability to persist – motivation.“If my students were only motivated to do the work, they would succeed.”We’ve all heard this sentiment expressed and have perhaps uttered it ourselves at some point in ourcareers as educators. And so we weave external motivators into our college policies and course syllabiand sometimes find ourselves pleading with students to show up for class, do their homework, andstick with it. Although these strategies may help some students in the short term, they aren’t enoughto help the growing number of non-traditional students with incredibly complex lives to develop theinternal motivation and habits of mind needed to persist and complete a degree.If we can help students tap into their own individual motivators, we can harness something verypowerful. When faced with a full-time course load and the need to work 35 hours per week to paythe bills, it’s the student’s internal drive to be the first in the family to graduate that pushes himforward. It’s the student’s desire to make a better life for her young child that powers her through.It’s their aspiration to be a part of something bigger than themselves that lifts them up. It’s the feelingof satisfaction after mastering a difficult concept, a peer’s story of success, or a mentor’s unyieldingsupport that ignites or sustains a student’s motivation at a particular point in time.As we consider the relationship between motivation and persistence in our students, a proper startingpoint is deep within ourselves. Throughout the conference, we’ll be reflecting on the question – Whatmotivates you? We ask that you pose this question to yourself and to each other and apply whatyou learn during the conference to your own plans for growth and achievement and your plans forcultivating the Power of Persistence among your students.We sincerely hope that you enjoy your time in Portland – the city we love and call home. Thank youfor coming, and please let us know how we can help make your experience in the City of Roses amemorable one.— GtCNN Team Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / i
  • 3. 8th ANNUAL • PEER LEARNING CONFERENCE July 23 - 25, 2012Table of Contents Acronyms...............................................................................................................v Glance Agenda at a Saturday, July 21......................................................................................................1 Sunday, July 22........................................................................................................1 Monday, July 23.......................................................................................................1 Tuesday, July 24.......................................................................................................3 Wednesday, July 25 .................................................................................................5 Complete Agenda Saturday, July 21......................................................................................................9 Sunday, July 22........................................................................................................9 Monday, July 23.......................................................................................................9 Tuesday, July 24.................................................................................................... 14 Wednesday, July 25 .............................................................................................. 18 Activities................................................................................... 25 Planned Social Doubletree Floor Plan........................................................................................ 26 Guest Presenters................................................................................................ 27 Student Leaders................................................................................................. 28 Acknowledgements............................................................................................ 32 Partner Profiles. .................................................................................................. 33 GtCNN Principles of Teaching and Learning................................................... 50 Power of Persistence: Three Keys to Achievement and Growth.................. 52 Action Planner............................................................................... 53 Three Keys: Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / iii
  • 4. 7th ANNUAL •Learning Conference • Acronyms Peer PEER LEARNING CONFERENCE July 23 - 25, 2012BCC-MA Bristol Community College Fall River, MABC Broward College Fort Lauderdale, FLCCC-NJ Camden County College Camden, NJCH-IT Christel House / Ivy Tech Community College Indianapolis, INCCSF City College of San Francisco San Francisco, CACCP Community College of Philadelphia Philadelphia, PACCC-CA Contra Costa College San Pablo, CADMACC Des Moines Area Community College Des Moines, IADTCC Durham Technical Community College Durham, NCEPCC El Paso Community College El Paso, TXECC Essex County College Newark, NJFSCJ Florida State College at Jacksonville Jacksonville, FLFRCC Front Range Community College Metro Denver, COGtCNN Gateway to College National Network Portland, ORGPC Georgia Perimeter College Metro Atlanta, GAHCC-WA Highline Community College Des Moines, WAHCC-MS Hinds Community College Raymond, MSHCC-MA Holyoke Community College Holyoke, MALWIT Lake Washington Institute of Technology Kirkland, WALC Laney College Oakland, CA Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / v
  • 5. Peer Learning Conference • AcronymsMCC-MA Massasoit Community College Brockton, MAMCC-NE Metropolitan Community College Omaha, NEMC Montgomery College Montgomery County, MDMCC-MI Mott Community College Flint, MIMWCC Mount Wachusett Community College Gardner, MAOCC Owens Community College Toledo, OHPAC Palo Alto College San Antonio, TXPC Phoenix College Phoenix, AZPCC-OR Portland Community College Portland, ORPCC-CO Pueblo Community College Pueblo, COQCC Quinsigamond Community College Worcester, MARCC Riverside City College Riverside, CASAC San Antonio College San Antonio, TXSTC-TX South Texas College McAllen, TXSCC Spartanburg Community College Spartanburg, SCSFCC Spokane Falls Community College Spokane, WASLCC St. Louis Community College St. Louis, MOvi / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 6. Peer Learning Conference • agenda AT A GLANCE July 23 - 25, 2012Saturday, July 21 8:30 – 4:45 Innovation Collaborative Capstone Training (Continental breakfast available at 8:00) OregonSunday, July 22 8:30  –    :30 Innovation Collaborative Capstone Training 4 (Continental breakfast available at 8:00) Oregon 9:00 – 4:00 Pre-Conference Training (Continental breakfast available at 8:30) Alaska/Idaho Making the Most of Project-Based Learning: Strategies to Maximize Effectiveness 5:00  –  7:30 Registration Open Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 6:30 –   :00 Student Leader Orientation 8 HalseyMonday, July 23 7:00  –    :00 Registration Open 8 Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 7:00  –    :00 Continental Breakfast 8 Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom 8:00 Conference Kick-off Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom 9:15 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 9:30 Plenary Session Persistence: The Power of A Real Life Story of Commitment Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom 10:45 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 11:00 – 4:30 Student Leader Outing Students meet in Broadway Room at 10:55 Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 1
  • 7. Peer Learning Conference • agenda AT A GLANCE 11:00 Concurrent Sessions Job-Alike Session I • Gateway Program Directors Three Sisters • Gateway Resource Specialists Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • Gateway Faculty Mt. Hood • Gateway Program Assistants/Data Liaisons Sellwood • Gateway K-12 and College Leaders Mt. Bachelor • Project DEgree Leads and Upper Leadership Ross Island • Project DEgree English/Language Arts Faculty Weidler • Project DEgree Math Faculty Morrison • Project DEgree Resource Specialists & Completion Advisors Mt. St. Helens 12:15 Lunch Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 1:15 Concurrent Sessions • Holistic Advising: Breaking Down Barriers and Building Bridges Three Sisters • Campus Policies Beyond the Gender Binary Sellwood Service Learning in the Curriculum • Integrating Ross Island • Thinking Like an Iceberg: Strategies and Tools for Critical Thinking Mt. Bachelor • Thinking Strategically About Increasing Outreach: A GtC Peer Best Practices Panel Discussion Mt. Hood Millennials: Finding New Ways to Understand, • Engaging Educate, and Inspire a Generation Mt. St. Helens • reating Dynamic Learning Experiences with C Online Credit Recovery Software Morrison 2:15 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 2:45 Concurrent Sessions Boost?: • Can I Get a A Tool Kit for Program Sustainability Sellwood • Financial Aid and Its Impact on Academic Advising Three Sisters • Gateway Live!: A Social Media Platform for Learning Across GtCNN Ross Island • Fresh Veggies, Canned Goods, and Toolbelts, Oh My! Examining Education Through a Service Learning Lens Mt. Bachelor2 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 8. Peer Learning Conference • agenda AT A GLANCE July 23 - 25, 2012 Practices for Student Engagement • Instructional Mt. Hood • Where Do Our Students Go? Results from the GtCNN Graduates and Leavers Studies Mt. St. Helens • Coaching the Team: Building Excellence and Persistence in 1st-term Students Morrison 3:45 Adjourn 5:30 - 7:30 Reception at the Oregon Museum of Science IndustryTuesday, July 24 7:00  –    :00 Continental Breakfast 8 Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 8:00 Plenary Session Culturally Responsive Teaching Understanding to Increase Student Motivation Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 9:30 Break Multnomah/Holladay Foyer 10:00 Concurrent Sessions to Enhance Culturally Responsive Teaching • Strategies Mt. St. Helens • Making Math Fun Again: Redesigning the Curriculum and Classroom for Mastery Learning Sellwood Stress and Burnout • Managing Three Sisters • Gateway Grads Going and Growing Mt. Bachelor Sync for Grads: • Moving in Strategies for School District - GtC Partnerships Mt. Hood Emotional Intelligence for Student Success • Nurturing Ross Island Gate: • Keys to the Fostering Student Success During Gateway Orientation Broadway • Thinking Strategically About Increasing Student Retention: A Participatory Planning Process Morrison 11:30 Lunch and Student Panel Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 3
  • 9. Peer Learning Conference • agenda AT A GLANCE 1:00 Concurrent Sessions • Roadtrip Nation: Engage, Inspire, and Empower Students to Pursue Their Career and Life Dreams Three Sisters • Solution Focused Classroom Management Sellwood • Principles of Holistic Student Support and the Chemistry of the Classroom Mt. Bachelor • Instructional Leadership to Enhance Motivation, Learning, and Persistence Mt. Hood • Moving Beyond Comfort Zones to Motivate the 21st Century Mathematics Student Morrison • Program Sustainability: Incorporating Strategies that Mitigate Programmatic Threats Mt. St. Helens • Project-Based Learning Meets the Community: Students Connect Courses, Service Learning, and Their Role in the Community Ross Island Student Leader Workshop • The Leader I Am, The Leader I Want to Be, The Leader I Found in Me Broadway 2:30 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 3:00 Concurrent Sessions Job-Alike Session II • Gateway Program Directors Three Sisters • Gateway Resource Specialists Mt. St. Helens • Gateway Faculty Mt. Hood • Gateway K-12 and College Leaders Mt. Bachelor • Project DEgree and ICO Program-Alike Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom Student Leader Workshop • Leaders Promoting and Embracing Diversity Broadway 4:15 Adjourn4 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 10. Peer Learning Conference • agenda AT A GLANCE July 23 - 25, 2012Wednesday, July 25 7:00  –    :00 Continental Breakfast 8 Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom 8:00 Plenary Session Persistence: The Power of Achievement and Growth Three Keys to Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 8:45 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 9:00  –   11:00 Creating a Collaborative and Cooperative Environment Among Data Liaisons Off site training 9:00 Concurrent Sessions • If These Walls Could Talk: Exploring the World of Our Young Women to Promote Student Confidence, Motivation, and Positive Relationships Mt. St. Helens • Feedback That Matters: Supporting Responsible College Writers One Student at a Time Ross Island • Self Discovery: The Path to Motivation Mt. Hood • Developing a Healthy Program Culture: Intentionally Shaping Your Students’ Experience Three Sisters • Making the Case: Building Support for Your Program Through Effective Messaging Mt. Bachelor • Librarians Are Your Friends — and a Powerful Resource for Your Students! Sellwood Student Leader Workshop • Hi Tech, Low Tech, Your Tech Power Morrison 10:00 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 5
  • 11. Peer Learning Conference • agenda AT A GLANCE 10:15 Concurrent Sessions or Power With? • Power Over Three Sisters • Digital Storytelling: A Powerful Tool for Telling Any Story Mt. Bachelor • Investigating the Literature: Persistence and Motivation Mt. Hood • What Do Zombie Walk, Blood Drives, and Student Senate Have in Common? Supporting Student Persistence through Resume Development Morrison to Engage and Assess • Click Here for Greater Learning Ross Island • Working Together: Create Success with Deeper Levels of Integration Sellwood What Matters Most to You Right Now? • Open Space: Mt. St. Helens 11:15 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 11:30 Team Time Next Steps Back Home this session to come back together with your team to share what you’ve learned and Use cement next steps back home. Gateway to College Teams • BCC-MA: Ross Island • CCC-CA: Weidler • CCC-NJ: Weidler Island • CCP: Ross Island • CCSF: Ross Sisters • CH-IT: Three • DMACC: Morrison • DTCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • ECC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • EPCC: Morrison6 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 12. Peer Learning Conference • agenda AT A GLANCE July 23 - 25, 2012 • FRCC: Morrison Sisters • FSCJ: Three • GPC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom Bachelor • HCC-MA: Mt. • HCC-MS: Three Sisters • HCC-WA: Three Sisters • LC: Weidler • LWIT: Mt. Bachelor Bachelor • MCC-MA: Mt. Bachelor • MCC-MI: Mt. Hood • MCC-NE: Mt. • MC: Mt. Bachelor Hood • MWCC: Mt. • OCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • PAC: Mt. Hood • PCC-CO: Weidler • PCC-OR: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • QCC: Mt. Hood Helens • RCC: Mt. St. Helens • SCC: Mt. St. • SFCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom St. Helens • STC-TX: Mt. Helens • SLCC: Mt. St. Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 7
  • 13. Peer Learning Conference • agenda AT A GLANCE Project DEgree Teams • BC: Sellwood • DTCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • ECC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • GPC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • OCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • PC: Sellwood • PCC-OR: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • SAC: Sellwood • SFCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 12:30 Lunch Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 1:15 Closing Session Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 2:00 Adjourn8 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 14. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda July 23 - 25, 2012Saturday, July 21 8:30 – 4:45 Innovation Collaborative Capstone Training (Continental breakfast available at 8:00) OregonSunday, July 22 8:30  –    :30 Innovation Collaborative Capstone Training 4 (Continental breakfast available at 8:00) Oregon 9:00 – 4:00 Pre-Conference Training (Continental breakfast available at 8:30) Alaska/Idaho Making the Most of Project-Based Learning: Strategies to Maximize Effectiveness Presenter: Suzie Boss S tudents are motivated by authentic, inquiry-driven projects relevant to their lives. In this hands-on workshop, participating teams will have an opportunity to design (or improve upon) interdisciplinary projects that recognize potential for students to make positive community contributions. Participants will also learn how to select appropriate digital tools, anticipate and troubleshoot challenges, and improve project quality through feedback from colleagues. 5:00  –  7:30 Registration Open Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 6:30 –   :00 Student Leader Orientation 8 HalseyMonday, July 23 7:00  –    :00 Registration Open 8 Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 7:00  –    :00 Continental Breakfast 8 Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom 8:00 Conference Kick-off Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom 9:15 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 9
  • 15. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda 9:30 Plenary Session Persistence: The Power of A Real Life Story of Commitment Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom Presenter: Kevin Carroll, Author, speaker, and agent for social change in his life, Kevin Carroll learned how to be resourceful, resilient, and W ithout parents constantly be on the lookout for nuggets of insight and wisdom from others. He spent endless hours at the neighborhood playground, the public library, and at school. Those three places proved to be catalysts in his journey from dysfunction and hardscrabble to becoming an author, a speaker, and an agent for social change. Kevin is living proof of the power of persistence. 10:45 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 11:00 – 4:30 Student Leader Outing Students meet in Broadway Room at 10:55 11:00 Concurrent Sessions Job-Alike Session I • Gateway Program Directors Three Sisters Facilitator: Prentice Davis, GtCNN • Gateway Resource Specialists Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom Facilitators: Lois Orner and Sarah Lechner, GtCNN • Gateway Faculty Mt. Hood Facilitators: Kris Barnum and Gaylen Brannon, GtCNN • Gateway Program Assistants/Data Liaisons Sellwood Facilitators: Aubrey Perry and Paul Clayton, GtCNN • Gateway K-12 and College Leaders Mt. Bachelor Facilitator: George Reese, GtCNN • Project DEgree Leads and Upper Leadership Ross Island Facilitator: Stephen Rice, GtCNN • Project DEgree English/Language Arts Faculty Weidler Facilitator: Tracy Schiffmann, GtCNN • Project DEgree Math Faculty Morrison Facilitators: Devora Shamah, GtCNN; and Jim Perry, OCC • Project DEgree Resource Specialists Completion Advisors Mt. St. Helens Facilitator: Marisol Naranjo, GtCNN 12:15 Lunch Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom10 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 16. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda July 23 - 25, 2012 1:15 Concurrent Sessions • Holistic Advising: Breaking Down Barriers and Building Bridges Three Sisters Presenters: Josh Westermann, Lisa Freeman, and Hadda Estrada, SFCC Holistic advising looks at each student individually, taking into account their experiences and history. This workshop will explore the power of holistic advising and the crucial role Resource Specialists play in helping students persist. Workshop participants will examine their advising approach and take away valuable strategies to frame meaningful holistic advising sessions. • Campus Policies Beyond the Gender Binary Sellwood Presenter: Vivian Ostrowski, HCC-MA Gateway’s New Student Survey has four “gender” options: female, male, transgender, and write-in. Genderqueer students often encounter hostile environments in their schools. This workshop will introduce participants to gender identity and expression, and focus on strategies to create trans-friendly programs. Service Learning in the Curriculum • Integrating Ross Island Presenters: David Clark, Tryphene McGee, and Na Keya Bazemore, GPC Interested in developing a meaningful service learning experience for your students? Workshop attendees will explore service learning models, brainstorm needs in their communities, and use the identified needs to develop motivating projects. Participants will leave this interactive workshop with ideas and ways to integrate service learning across curricula. • Thinking Like an Iceberg: Strategies and Tools for Critical Thinking Mt. Bachelor Presenter: Gaylen Brannon-Trottier, GtCNN The Iceberg is a metaphor for critical thinking, moving students to look beneath the obvious for deeper understanding. Learn the components of the iceberg and how to fluidly move students to higher levels of critical thinking. Applicable to a variety of topics and disciplines. • Thinking Strategically About Increasing Outreach: A GtC Peer Best Practices Panel Discussion Mt. Hood Presenters: Jessica Walker Beaumont, Strategic Planning Consultant, MDRC; Miguel Contreras, RCC; and Marlana Schnell, DMACC Efficiently finding the “right fit” student for Gateway to College takes a lot of time and effort. Learn about a participatory process that your peers have used to create a strategic plan for increased outreach, and their results from it. Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 11
  • 17. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda Millennials: Finding New Ways to Understand, • Engaging Educate, and Inspire a Generation Mt. St. Helens Presenter: Jahsie Ault, GtCNN Come to this interactive workshop to gain insight into the Millennial mindset. By better understanding the ethos of the generation, educators will learn new ways to engage and inspire students to persist and achieve inside the classroom and in the greater community. • reating Dynamic Learning Experiences with C Online Credit Recovery Software Morrison Presenter: Carol Smith, CCP Credit recovery software saves time and money for the program but what is the quality of the experience for the student? How can we insure that we are engaging the student and enhancing their college readiness skills while utilizing this tool? 2:15 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 2:45 Concurrent Sessions • Can I Get a Boost?: A Tool Kit for Program Sustainability Sellwood Presenters: Laurie Lopez Coleman, Lisa Black, Terri Slonaker, Susan Falcon, and Jeanette Bunch, SAC Does your college need stronger faculty engagement and buy-in from stakeholders with the Project DEgree model? Discover approaches for maximizing your Project DEgree training and development to address scaling. A tool-kit with the step-by-step process to address common challenges will be provided. • Financial Aid and Its Impact on Academic Advising Three Sisters Presenter: Prentice Davis, GtCNN While Gateway to College students do not receive financial aid while enrolled in the program, federal regulations may impact students’ ability to receive financial aid when they move beyond Gateway. We will review financial aid regulations around Satisfactory Academic Progress, discuss the impact on advising Gateway students, and provide recommendations that mitigate future financial aid eligibility challenges. • Gateway Live!: A Social Media Platform for Learning Across GtCNN Ross Island Presenter: Niles McGiver, GtCNN Looking to find something innovative to mix up the routine in your classroom or college? Have a web tool, activity, or lesson plan you want to share? This workshop will show you how to use Gateway Live! to learn about and share innovation across GtCNN.12 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 18. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda July 23 - 25, 2012 • Fresh Veggies, Canned Goods, and Toolbelts, Oh My! Examining Education Through a Service Learning Lens Mt. Bachelor Presenters: Jennifer Hazel and Stacy Cupps-Alexander, OCC Through a fun, hands-on activity that integrates service learning with a composition course, participants will experience clear examples of integrated assignments and leave with knowledge and tools for integrating service learning into project-based learning on their campuses. Practices for Student Engagement • Instructional Mt. Hood Presenters: Joseph Metts and Ferncita Etienne, BC Learning communities have the potential to be deeply empowering. Grounded in Astin’s Theory of Student Involvement, the presenters will facilitate discussions and interactive strategies to help participants explore instructional practices that are responsive to the diverse needs and maturity levels of students. • Where Do Our Students Go? Results from the GtCNN Graduates and Leavers Studies Mt. St. Helens Presenters: Devora Shamah, GtCNN; and Steven Rider and Katie Winters, Pacific Research and Evaluation Gateway to College students continue their education post GtC? How do they Do reflect on their experiences? Are there ways we could have served them better? Come hear the results of the recent studies conducted by Pacific Research and Evaluation with former GtC students, and explore ways to share these results with stakeholders. • Coaching the Team: Building Excellence and Persistence in 1st-term Students Morrison Presenter: Betty Handy, CCP Students entering college for the first time have the same goal - successful completion. Coaching inspires excellence, raises personal and academic standards, and builds a strong community. Participants will learn how this team approach allows students to feel a sense of belonging, accountability, and pride as they advance through their introductory semester in college. 3:45 Adjourn 5:30 - 7:30 Reception at the Oregon Museum of Science Industry 1945 SE Water Ave Portland, OR 97214 Courtyard Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 13
  • 19. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agendaTuesday, July 24 7:00  –    :00 Continental Breakfast 8 Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 8:00 Plenary Session Culturally Responsive Teaching Understanding to Increase Student Motivation Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom Presenters: Dr. Margery B. Ginsberg and Dr. Raymond J. Wlodkowski S tudents’ motivation is inseparable from their culture. Cultural diversity presents opportunities to benefit all students. This presentation will address how to create learning environments that allow the integrity of every learner to be sustained while each person attains success. It will demonstrate the use of a motivational framework that 1) respects cultural diversity; 2) engages the motivation of a broad range of students; 3) creates an inclusive learning climate; 4) derives teaching practices from across disciplines and cultures; and 5) promotes equitable learning. 9:30 Break Multnomah/Holladay Foyer 10:00 Concurrent Sessions • Strategies to Enhance Culturally Responsive Teaching Mt. St. Helens Presenters: Dr. Margery B. Ginsberg and Dr. Raymond J. Wlodkowski There are specific teaching strategies and norms for culturally responsive teaching. This presentation will provide pragmatic examples of those teaching approaches found to be most effective through research and field experience with working adults during the last thirty years. • Making Math Fun Again: Redesigning the Curriculum and Classroom for Mastery Learning Sellwood Presenter: Gina Gavin, GPC Would your students rather watch paint dry than do math? Make the Math 20 course exciting again through computer-assisted intensive instruction! Come and learn steps to redesigning Math 20 and receive an online tour and demonstration of the MyFoundationsLab online software. Stress and Burnout • Managing Three Sisters Presenters: Tracy Schiffmann and Lois Orner, GtCNN Participants will use some personally selected strategies for soothing and centering themselves to manage burnout and stress in their lives.14 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 20. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda July 23 - 25, 2012 • Gateway Grads Going and Growing – A Panel Discussion Mt. Bachelor Facilitator: Pam Blumenthal, PCC-OR What happens to Gateway students after graduation and transfer to a four-year institution? What keeps them focused and how did Gateway prepare them for educational success? Be inspired and informed by a panel of Gateway grads and gain a deeper understanding about what your grads face as they transition from community college to a university. Sync for Grads: • Moving in Strategies for School District - GtC Partnerships Mt. Hood Presenter: Kris Barnum, GtCNN School district and Gateway leaders will gather to revisit what gets us to our shared bottom line: high school graduates. Hear from successful partnership builders and then construct your own tool, an “in sync” web of local connections and new strategies. Emotional Intelligence for Student Success • Nurturing Ross Island Presenters: Lisa Black and Jeanette Bunch, SAC Making emotional connections to motivation is vital to student success. Participants will leave this workshop with a model for a student success course with emotional intelligence as an outcome and artistic expression of student voice as the integrated project. Gate: • Keys to the Fostering Student Success During Gateway Orientation Broadway Presenters: Deb Bibeau, MWCC; Kyle Kinney, MCC-NE; Jill Marks, RCC; and Erik Baumann, BCC-MA What does it take to build the Gateway culture while getting students REALLY ready for the first day of class? Four programs will provide ideas on what works well, as well as ideas for one-, two-, or three-day orientation models, both pre-term and during first week of the term. Participants will walk away with a better understanding of how to execute new student orientation, plus they’ll receive a mini-reference manual with content-based ideas, outcomes, and best practices to use in their programs. Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 15
  • 21. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda • Thinking Strategically About Increasing Student Retention: A Participatory Planning Process Morrison Presenters: Jessica Walker Beaumont, Strategic Planning Consultant, MDRC; Marti Demarest, FRCC; and Jill Marks, RCC There is no single solution for improving student retention. Collaborate with your peers to begin a process for developing a national strategic plan for increasing student retention, facilitated by a MDRC professional strategic planning consultant and two GtC program directors. 11:30 Lunch and Student Panel Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom 1:15 Prentice Davis, GtCNN Facilitator: ear from Gateway and Project DEgree students as they share their stories of struggle, triumph, H and persistence. 1:00 Concurrent Sessions • Roadtrip Nation: Engage, Inspire, and Empower Students to Pursue Their Career and Life Dreams Three Sisters Presenters: Natalie Mercier, MWCC; Brenda Forsse, RCC; Amy Thompson, FSCJ; and Jimi Spatharos, Roadtrip Nation “This curriculum really took hold of my life and made me think deeply about what I want; I found my passion!” Roadtrip Nation engages students in identifying and pursuing career, education, and life goals. Three GtC programs are loving this innovative, interactive, and easy to use curriculum — hear their stories! • Solution Focused Classroom Management Sellwood Presenter: Tracy Schiffmann, GtCNN Instructors will learn solution focused classroom management strategies for challenging behavior that will build on student strengths, support their acclimation to college culture, and maintain a pleasant, productive classroom for all. • Principles of Holistic Student Support and the Chemistry of the Classroom Mt. Bachelor Presenters: Lois Orner, Jahsie Ault, and Daniel Couch, GtCNN Explore the dynamic chemical reactions that occur in the classroom when the Principles of Holistic Student Support are incorporated. Investigate how, when used in concert with your other instructional strategies, the principles can positively impact classroom learning.16 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 22. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda July 23 - 25, 2012 • Instructional Leadership to Enhance Motivation, Learning, and Persistence Mt. Hood Presenters: Dr. Margery B. Ginsberg and Dr. Raymond J. Wlodkowski Demonstrating daily one’s commitment to exemplary instruction is a hallmark of committed educational leaders. Participants will learn pragmatic and specific strategies that promote motivation and equitable learning in everyday interactions between leaders and those they serve. • Moving Beyond Comfort Zones to Motivate the 21st Century Mathematics Student Morrison Presenters: Karen Jackson, Marguerita Best, and Dorene MacKinnon, DTCC Through active and collaborative activities focused on student mathematics outcomes and emporium model course design and delivery, participants will leave this workshop with a framework for beginning or continuing the development and implementation of emporium modeled developmental math courses. • Program Sustainability: Incorporating Strategies that Mitigate Programmatic Threats Mt. St. Helens Presenter: Prentice Davis, GtCNN Program Sustainability: How can it be achieved? Join us for an interactive discussion where we will identify the known threats to sustainability and devise apt solutions that mitigate challenges that adversely impact program sustainability. • Project-Based Learning Meets the Community: Students Connect Courses, Service Learning, and Their Role in the Community Ross Island Presenters: Rebecca Andersen and Deborah Edwall, PCC-OR What do project-based learning, community-based non-profit organizations, and community college students have in common? Experience how students connect their courses through a project that brings the community into the classroom, and then returns the learning to the community. Brainstorm ideas to apply this model to your program. Student Leader Workshop • The Leader I Am, The Leader I Want to Be, The Leader I Found in Me Broadway Presenters: Charles Ramirez, CCC-CA; and Emily Rico, GtCNN Students will be empowered to discover ways in which they can serve as leaders on their campus and in their communities. They will have the opportunity to participate in challenging group activities and to reflect on, and discuss, their unique leadership styles and experiences. Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 17
  • 23. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda 2:30 Break Multnomah/Holladay Foyer 3:00 Concurrent Sessions Job-Alike Session II • Gateway Program Directors Three Sisters Facilitator: Prentice Davis, GtCNN • Gateway Resource Specialists Mt. St. Helens Facilitators: Lois Orner and Sarah Lechner, GtCNN • Gateway Faculty Mt. Hood Facilitators: Kris Barnum and Gaylen Brannon, GtCNN • Gateway K-12 and College Leaders Mt. Bachelor Facilitator: George Reese, GtCNN • Project DEgree and ICO Program-Alike Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom Facilitators: Project DEgree team, GtCNN Student Leader Workshop • Leaders Promoting and Embracing Diversity Broadway Facilitators: Taheera Hoskins, HCC-MS; and Balbina Cardoso, MCC-MA Students will engage in stimulating discussion regarding leadership roles and how they can impact various diversity issues that presently face our society. Students will be encouraged to actively participate in promoting cultural awareness and changing stereotypical attitudes that will enhance understanding and interaction between people. 4:15 AdjournWednesday, July 25 7:00  –    :00 Continental Breakfast 8 Multnomah /Holladay Ballroom 8:00 Plenary Session Persistence: The Power of Achievement and Growth Three Keys to Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom Presenters: GtCNN Team 8:45 Break Multnomah/Holladay Foyer 18 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 24. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda July 23 - 25, 2012 9:00  –   11:00 Creating a Collaborative and Cooperative Environment Among Data Liaisons Off site training* Presenters: Aubrey Perry and Paul Clayton, GtCNN Entering information into your student database can be a lonely experience. But it doesn’t have to be that way. Attendees will take a field trip to the National Network office where they will work collaboratively with peers all across the country. Points of focus will include building a community of practice among data liaisons and utilizing reports to learn critical information about their programs. * ote: This workshop is intended for data liaisons only. Roundtrip shuttle service will be N provided. Board the complimentary shuttle outside the main entrance of the DoubleTree hotel at 8:55 a.m. 9:00 Concurrent Sessions • If These Walls Could Talk: Exploring the World of Our Young Women to Promote Student Confidence, Motivation, and Positive Relationships Mt. St. Helens Presenter: Michele Kennedy-Johnson, FSCJ At Florida State College at Jacksonville our weekly “Pathway Pearls” sessions provide an affinity group for our young women. Both students and staff report a significant positive impact. Come engage in a lively, interactive discussion about the benefits of this group and the potential for others. • Feedback That Matters: Supporting Responsible College Writers One Student at a Time Ross Island Presenter: Laurie Lopez Coleman, SAC Have you ever wished your students actually applied the feedback you give them on their essays? Find out ways you can save time and frustration over wasted feedback with just a few targeted intervention strategies. Sample assignments and rubrics provided. • Self Discovery: The Path to Motivation Mt. Hood Presenters: Marge Bartelt and Alexis De Anda, OCC This interactive workshop will demonstrate the process of motivating students to create a concept map of their semester learning and their answer to the driving question. Participants will create a concept map that reflects learning and the driving question, and create a rubric to assess the concept map. Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 19
  • 25. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda • Developing a Healthy Program Culture: Intentionally Shaping Your Students’ Experience Three Sisters Presenter: Sarah Lechner, GtCNN Challenge the status quo to consciously shape a program culture in which students thrive. Align program design and staff behaviors with the underlying values of your program to boost students’ outcomes and experience. Create an environment in which everybody (students and staff) wants to show up! • Making the Case: Building Support for Your Program Through Effective Messaging Mt. Bachelor Presenters: Rachel Antrobus, Nick Mathern, Bernadette DeVito, and Ben Byers, GtCNN How well you tell your story has important implications for your program’s long-term health. Through this workshop, you will gain insight into crafting compelling messages for different audiences and will leave with practical tools and strategies to help you transform internal, local, and state decision makers into your champions and help your program thrive for years to come. • Librarians Are Your Friends — and a Powerful Resource for Your Students! Sellwood Presenters: Rebecca Razavi, Amy Crowley, and Lisa Clarke, MC In this workshop you will learn about a powerful way to expand your community of practice by integrating a series of library skills workshops into your first-year curriculum in a way that will measurably improve student success by instilling new skills, confidence and a stronger connection to the college environment. Student Leader Workshop Tech, Your Tech Power • Hi Tech, Low Morrison Presenter: Lisa Black, SAC Technology is so important. From study skills websites to cell phone apps— we will explore a number of powerful tools you can use for your learning next semester! We will end with a demonstration of a useful site that will allow you to store the many tools we discuss so that they are organized and accessible. 10:00 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer20 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 26. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda July 23 - 25, 2012 10:15 Concurrent Sessions or Power With? • Power Over Three Sisters Presenters: Vivian Ostrowski, Julissa Colon, and Jada Waters, HCC-MA Power is complicated. Programs must ensure that students meet particular standards, but a “because I said so!!” approach is doomed. This workshop explores power dynamics with colleagues, students, and institutions, and how those dynamics influence program culture and build ownership. • Digital Storytelling: A Powerful Tool for Telling Any Story Mt. Bachelor Presenters: Sean McAndrew and Alicia Taylor, FRCC Please join us and learn what Digital Storytelling is and what the power of Digital Storytelling can do for you and your students. Participants will see student projects firsthand and come away with an understanding of storytelling approaches, software availability, and a student’s “take” on learning through the digital storytelling process. • Investigating the Literature: Persistence and Motivation Mt. Hood Presenters: Heather McCambly and Devora Shamah, GtCNN does research say about persistence and motivation? We will take a quick What tour of current research in community college settings and highlight promising practices and interventions that foster motivation to support student persistence. A bibliography and web resources will be provided. • What Do Zombie Walk, Blood Drives, and Student Senate Have in Common? Supporting Student Persistence through Resume Development Morrison Presenters: Yvonne Hu-Cotto and Diane Tait, MC Resume-writing is not just something you teach in a career development course; it is a holistic advising tool! Hear one student’s story on her resume development and analyze sample resumes of Gateway alums to see how students persevered and became successful. to Engage and Assess for Greater Learning • Click Here Ross Island Presenters: Mary Legner and Matthew Mortimer, RCC Effective learning requires student engagement and regular feedback about student progress. Join us to learn how “clickers” can be used to engage and assess all students in all subjects, and experience what it’s like to use clickers as a learner. Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 21
  • 27. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda • Working Together: Create Success with Deeper Levels of Integration Sellwood Presenters: Christie Roe, Joyce Gleason, and Diana Mitchell, PC During our three semesters, we have developed an integration strategy for increasing the success rates of our developmental students. Participants will have a chance to examine the program features and participate in exercises that brainstorm integrated curriculum ideas. • Open Space: What Matters Most to You Right Now? Mt. St. Helens we wrap up the conference, is there anything lingering that you still want to As discuss with peers? A participatory and flexible format, during Open Space anyone can propose a topic. The agenda develops based on interests and participants choose where they’d like to lead or join in. 11:15 Break Multnomah /Holladay Foyer 11:30 Team Time Next Steps Back Home this session to come back together with your team to share what you’ve learned and Use cement next steps back home. Gateway to College Teams • BCC-MA: Ross Island • CCC-CA: Weidler • CCC-NJ: Weidler Island • CCP: Ross Sisters • CCSF: Three • CH-IT: Ross Island • DMACC: Morrison • DTCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • ECC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • EPCC: Morrison • FRCC: Morrison Sisters • FSCJ: Three22 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 28. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda July 23 - 25, 2012 • GPC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom Bachelor • HCC-MA: Mt. • HCC-MS: Three Sisters • HCC-WA: Three Sisters • LC: Weidler • LWIT: Mt. Bachelor Bachelor • MCC-MA: Mt. Bachelor • MCC-MI: Mt. Hood • MCC-NE: Mt. • MC: Mt. Bachelor Hood • MWCC: Mt. • OCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • PAC: Mt. Hood • PCC-CO: Weidler • PCC-OR: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • QCC: Mt. Hood Helens • RCC: Mt. St. Helens • SCC: Mt. St. • SFCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom St. Helens • STC-TX: Mt. Helens • SLCC: Mt. St. Project DEgree Teams • BC: Sellwood • DTCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • ECC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • GPC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • OCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 23
  • 29. Peer Learning Conference • Complete agenda • PC: Sellwood • PCC-OR: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom • SAC: Sellwood • SFCC: Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 12:30 Lunch Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 1:15 Closing Session Multnomah/Holladay Ballroom 2:00 Adjourn 2012 Peer Learning Conference Reception Sponsors Thank you for your generous support!24 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 30. Peer Learning Conference • planned social Activities July 23 - 25, 2012Monday, July 23GtC National Network Reception at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry (OMSI)Time: 5:30 – 7:30 pmLocation: 945 SE Water Ave, Portland, OR 97214, in the Courtyard 1Details: Spend a few hours reconnecting with peers and meeting new ones! The outdoor reception will feature light refreshments, a no-host bar, and an outstanding view of the Portland waterfront. Due to space limitations, the reception is open to registered PLC attendees only.Shuttle Free shuttle service will be provided from the Doubletree to the reception and back, with boardingService: beginning at 5:00 pm and return service beginning at 7:30 pm. Feel free to board the shuttle at your convenience. Seating will be on a first-come, first-served basis.Tuesday, July 24Optional Group OutingTime: Meet in the Doubletree lobby at 5:30 pmDetails: GtCNN staff will lead the group on an excursion to downtown Portland, likely focusing on the Pearl District and NW 23rd areas which have lots of shops and restaurants. The group will use the MAX light rail to get to/from downtown, and will also have dinner (no-host) at some point during the outing. This outing will involve a good bit of walking, so be sure to wear comfortable shoes! Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 25
  • 31. Peer Learning Conference • doubletree Floor Plan26 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 32. Peer Learning Conference • guest presenters July 23 - 25, 2012Suzie Boss is a writer and educational consultant who focuses on the power of teaching and learning to improvelives and transform communities. Co-author of Reinventing Project-Based Learning: Your Field Guide to Real-WorldProjects in the Digital Age, she is a regular contributor to Edutopia and the Stanford Social Innovation Review.Suzie is on the National Faculty of the Buck Institute for Education and has worked with educators internationallyto bring project-based learning to both traditional classrooms and informal learning settings. Collaborating withnonprofit organizations, she has helped to develop programs that engage youth and adults as communityproblem-solvers. Her forthcoming book, Bringing Innovation to School, will be published in July 2012.Kevin Carroll is the founder of Kevin Carroll Katalyst/LLC and the author of three highly successful books,Rules of the Red Rubber Ball, What’s Your Red Rubber Ball?! and The Red Rubber Ball at Work, published byESPN, Disney Press and McGraw-Hill. As an author, speaker and agent for social change (a.k.a. the Katalyst), itis Carroll’s “job” to inspire businesses, organizations and individuals—from CEOs and employees of Fortune 500companies to schoolchildren—to embrace their spirit of play and creativity to maximize their human potential andsustain more meaningful business and personal growth. Carroll has dedicated his life to advancing sports and playas a vehicle for social change. He partners with non-governmental organizations and businesses around the worldthat share his vision and goals. Carroll holds an M.S. in Health Education from St. Joseph’s University, a B.A. inSpeech Communication with a minor in Physical Education from Angelo State University, and an A.A. in Interpretingand Translating from the Community College of the Air Force. Carroll is a frequent visiting professor across theUnited States.Margery Ginsberg is an associate professor of education at the University of Washington-Seattle where sheteaches in the Leadership for Learning Program (L4L) for system-level leaders on topics including instructionalrenewal, professional learning, and school transformation. In addition, she founded and co-directs the Centerfor Action, Inquiry, and Motivation, a joint initiative of the Seattle Public Schools and the University of Washington(aimcenterseattle.org). Dr. Ginsberg began her work in education as a math teacher on two Indian reservations andalso provided technical assistance around Title I within the US Department of Education. She has authoredor co-authored numerous books including, most recently, Transformative Professional Learning: A System toEnhance Teacher and Student Motivation (Thousand Oaks: Corwin Press). Dr. Ginsberg earned a Ph.D. inBilingual/Multicultural/Social Foundations of Education from the University of Colorado-Boulder.Raymond Wlodkowski began his work in education as an elementary school teacher in the Detroit PublicSchools. For the last thirty years he has taught at universities throughout the United States and Canada withprofessorships at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Antioch-Seattle, and Regis University-Denver. Heis a psychologist whose work encompasses adult motivation and learning, cultural diversity, and professionaldevelopment in higher education. He is the author of Enhancing Adult Motivation to Learn, twice the recipient ofthe Phillip E. Frandson Award for Literature (1986 and 2009), and the co-author of Diversity Motivation, winnerof the 2010 Cyril O. Houle Award for Outstanding Literature in Adult Education. Dr. Wlodkowski lives in Seattle andconducts seminars for colleges and organizations throughout North America. He earned a Ph.D. in educationalpsychology from Wayne State University in Detroit. Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 27
  • 33. Peer Learning Conference • student leadersJonathan Bales represents Des Moines Area Community College. He is 19 years old and enrolled inGateway to College in the fall 2011 semester with 22 high school credits. Jonathan expects to graduate at theend of the summer 2012 semester. He has accrued 6 credits for high school and 22 credits for college. Jonathanwants to continue at DMACC to obtain an associate’s degree and will pursue a career in chemistry. When askedwhat motivates him to persevere, he says, “I know that better days for me lay at the end of this.”Auntais Faulkner represents Durham Technical Community College. He is 20 years old and enrolled inthe Gateway to College program during the summer of 2011. Auntais entered with five high school credits. Today,he has 13. He is expected to graduate in the fall of 2013. Upon graduating from high school, Auntais will beginworking toward his Associate in Arts Degree with an emphasis on fine arts. He plans to attend the University ofNorth Carolina at Wilmington to major in theatre arts. In 2011, Auntais was the recipient of the Job Links Youth ofthe Year award.Malik Goins represents Georgia Perimeter College. He enrolled in Project DEgree at GPC during thespring 2011 semester, and was 19 at the time. His career goal is to be a video game designer or an IT contractorfor different companies. Malik says, “My motivation to keep pursuing my dreams when facing adversities is myfaith. I know that I can succeed and will succeed. Project DEgree has changed the way I view myself vastly. It hasgiven me a newfound confidence in myself as well as in my learning abilities. It has made me more confident todream big and chase my dreams rather than to settle for less.”Tim Grindle represents Owens Community College. He started the Project DEgree program at Owens inAugust 2011 at 18 years of age. Tim is about to enter his third semester of college and has completed 26 collegecredits so far. He says, “Each day I try to stay positive because I know all the hard work I put forth comes from myvery own dedication and willpower. I am thankful and appreciative to all who have helped me be the person I amtoday. My dream career is to help all those who struggle in life to get lifted up in some way, shape or form. Justknowing that I have inspired someone to be successful makes me feel stronger as a person.”Felicia Juarez represents Metropolitan Community College. She began Gateway to College inSeptember 2010 as a 19 year old needing 15 high school credits to graduate. Surviving family and housingdisruptions, Felicia has excelled at MCC earning 72 college credits on the way to earning her high school diplomain May 2012. Reflecting on her Gateway to College experience, Felicia says, “It has helped me to realize that Ican accomplish things that I never thought I could. I have come so far since I began Gateway, I feel like I can doanything that I set out to do.” Felicia will carry this confidence as she looks to begin the registered nursing programthis fall.28 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 34. Peer Learning Conference • student leaders July 23 - 25, 2012Catherine Lisman represents Portland Community College. She is eighteen years old and started inGateway to College in the fall of 2011 with 10 high school credits. Since enrolling, she’s accumulated 10 additionalhigh school credits and 35 college credits. Cat has been on the President’s List or Honor’s List every term andis expected to graduate March 2013. After graduation she plans to transfer to Western Washington Universityto study medicine. Cat says, “My future is what motivates me to persevere through challenges. I want to besuccessful, and in order to do that, I have to get my diploma. No matter how hard it may be.”Jemmy Maignon represents Georgia Perimeter College. He enrolled in Project DEgree last year at theage of 19. Since then, Jemmy has earned four college credits. Jemmy says, “I’m an aspiring film maker with acreative mind and lots of ideas. My goals are to take pictures, film, and edit. Project DEgree has motivated me tocontinue to do more and try hard. This way I can say I’ll have a good future as I continue in the direction that I’mgoing in.”Lindsey Minnig represents Owens Community College. She enrolled in Project DEgree in the fall of 2011when she was 19. In only two semesters she has earned 29 credits and plans to transfer to a four-year institutionto earn her bachelor’s degree in dietetics. Her career goal is to be an athletic trainer at a large university or for aprofessional sports team. Lindsey says, “I feel like Project DEgree has given me confidence to do well in school.During high school I never had the support I needed, but now I feel like I can be successful at anything in school.I will definitely keep this confidence even when I go to a university.”Akela Mitchell represents Community College of Philadelphia. She was 16 when she applied in thespring of 2011 and had no high school credits. Akela now has 15 high school credits and 31 college credits. Thisyear, she received 3 academic awards from Gateway: Academics, Most Involved, and Most Persistent. Akela willgraduate Gateway in the spring of 2013 and plans to pursue a career in clinical psychology. She says, “Gatewayhas changed the way I view myself and my future … building my confidence, supporting me no matter what. Thepeople in Gateway encourage me to step out of my comfort zone. They have been ‘parents’ when needed orsimply my friend.”Marquis Moore represents Massasoit Community College. He is 21 and began Gateway to College inthe fall of 2011. Marquis says, “Even though my mother had high expectations of a bright future for me, I made allthe wrong choices. Success and education meant nothing to me then. I did not think of the consequences of myirresponsible decisions. Now, I have earned 23 college credits and will graduate in June 2013. My goal is to earna Bachelor’s in Criminal Justice. Every day, I am inspired by this quote, ‘Live for tomorrow, not today.’ Being in theprogram has made me realize that I can have a brighter future. The caring staff and dedicated professors havehelped me to push myself, to learn more. This program has changed my life.” Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 29
  • 35. Peer Learning Conference • student leadersJoanna Murphy represents Spokane Falls Community College. She was 19 when she enrolled inProject DEgree, and has accrued 52 college credits so far. Because Joanna has a strong interest in counseling/advising, she plans to major in psychology and minor in education. “I want to help students like myself who havestruggled with school,” she says. Joanna has been recognized for high academic achievement by making theVice Presidents Honor Roll. “School is the challenge in my life right now. I will work hard now and be rewardedlater. I can do anything I put my mind to with a little hard work. Having regular visits with an advisor to help plan myfuture is an aspect of Project DEgree that has helped me be successful.”Candace Negrete represents Metropolitan Community College. She is 17 years old and beganGateway to College in the fall quarter of 2011 with 32 high school credits. Candace has worked hard whileenrolled in the program and has earned five high school credits and 24.5 college credits. She expects to graduatein March 2013, and her future plans are to become a registered nurse and eventually a hematologist. Candacesays, “What motivates me the most is my mother’s success and how I want to be like her.”Rachel Padro represents Front Range Community College. She entered Gateway to College in thefall of 2011 at age 16 with very few high school credits. Now in her third semester, Rachel has earned 6 collegecredits and 12 high school credits. She hopes to continue her studies after graduating in the spring of 2013 andeventually earn an M.A. in English and teach at the college level. Rachel is motivated by a desire to improve her lifeand those around her. Prior to enrolling in Gateway, Rachel was resolved to getting her GED but the opportunityto earn her diploma and college credits has Rachel thinking ahead and living by the motto, “Life doesn’t happeneventually.”Jennifer Rebollar represents South Texas College. She started Gateway to College in the spring 2012term at age 18 and has earned 3.5 high school credits so far. After she graduates, she plans to pursue a master’sdegree in business management with the goal of one day owning her own restaurant. When asked about her viewof her college education, Jennifer said, “I dreamed of going, but never thought in a million years I could. Now, I seemyself being able to continue and to be the best I can be.”Megan Reiser represents Mount Wachusett Community College. She is 18 and entered the Gatewayto College program in the fall of 2011. Megan completed her high school diploma requirements in May and plansto pursue a degree in criminal justice and EMT certification at MWCC. She says, “Throughout my education, I havetried my hardest to be a strong, hardworking individual. I have many goals in life, including graduating high schooland college, getting a career I enjoy, having a family, and being successful in whatever I want to do. Whether theobstacles in my path are academic, social, or personal, I strive to overcome them and complete my goals. In myopinion, completing school is a very important goal to becoming successful in life.”Cassandra Robinson represents St. Louis Community College. She is 19 and enrolled in Gateway toCollege in the fall of 2011 with 17 high school credits. Cassandra completed her high school diploma requirementsin May. She says, “If it wasn’t for Gateway, I probably wouldn’t have graduated on time. It made a difference tome because now I can finally say ‘I have a high school diploma and a better attitude with it.’ When I encounter achallenge, I tell myself not to give up hope because in the long run I’m going to have rewards to show from mysuccess.”30 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 36. Peer Learning Conference • student leaders July 23 - 25, 2012Christian Rodgers represents Spokane Falls Community College. He is 20 and has earned 35 collegecredits since entering Project DEgree last year. Christian is still deciding on his career path, but he plans to beeither an accountant or a veterinarian. He says, “What has been great is that I learned that I had the ability toaccomplish my goals; I just needed the focus to reach them. I’m the second generation going to college in myfamily, and that helps me face the challenges I encounter. Being able to talk to my instructors and my advisor whenI need their help has also really contributed to my success.”Krista Schmitt represents Portland Community College. She is 25 years old and is in her third term ofProject DEgree. Krista says, “I am in school because I want to be a nurse. I have a passion for helping people, andit is something I want to make a career out of. I was helped so much by nurses during my recovery from addiction,and I want to be the one to make a difference in the lives of others, just like the difference was made in my life. ”Diane Tait represents Montgomery College. She entered Gateway to College in the spring of 2010 as an18 year-old with 16 high school credits. She graduated in June 2012 with 47 college credits, as a member of theinternational honor society, and as president of Live Action Role Play club. Diane plans to pursue a B.S. degree inmolecular cell biology and a Ph.D. in immunology. Diane says, “Gateway changed my way of thinking and made itpossible for me to be where I am today. I was blessed with the instructors and the resource specialist who pushedme to make achievable goals and taught me to reach for the moon and land among the stars.”Bridget Talamantes represents South Texas College. She started Gateway to College in August 2011 atage 16 and has earned 5 high school credits so far. Bridget says, “I am a dedicated student and a challenge taker.I have enjoyed and appreciate being a Gateway to College student because it has made me responsible and arestored person.”Christopher Young represents Massasoit Community College. He says, “I am in this program becauseI made very immature decisions. As a young black kid in a predominantly white town, I felt stereotyped. Therefore,I fell right into the assumed image and got into trouble. Then, reality hit me and I realized that I did not want tobe another statistic. I decided to get back into school and do whatever it takes to be successful. Being in theGateway to College program changed my life. Now, I see myself as a leader — smart, mature, and self-motivated.I have set my goals for my future — get my Master’s in computer science to start my own business, maybe eventeach high school classes — and have a plan to accomplish those goals.” Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 31
  • 37. Peer Learning Conference • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Gateway to College National Network wishes to thank everyone who responded to the request for essays and Tweets on the topic of motivation. We are pleased to recognize this year’s featured essayists: Stacy Cupps-Alexander, Owens Community College Jim Harper, Gateway to College National Network Board of Directors Eugenia Hooker, Spartanburg Community College Christine Kelly-Kleese, Durham Technical Community College Nick Mathern, Gateway to College National Network Martin Mendoza, Project DEgree student, San Antonio College Dalton Olson, Gateway to College student, Metropolitan Community College Leah Rapoza, Gateway to College graduate, Portland Community College32 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 38. partner profiles July 23 - 25, 2012 Bristol Community College offers educational opportunities and solid career preparation to students throughout southeastern Massachusetts. With three campus locations, as well as two satellite locations, Bristol offers more than 120 career and transfer programs of study.Fall River, Massachusetts Gateway partner Began serving students in January 2012 Started in: 2010 Broward College offers associate Fall 2011 total students: 68 and bachelor degrees and Average age at entry: 19.3 certificate programs at 3 campuses Two largest ethnic groups: and numerous satellite centers in Black/African American 64.0% the Greater Fort Lauderdale/ Ft. Lauderdale, Florida Hispanic/Latino 21.3% Broward County community. The First generation college-goer: 67.9% Project DEgree partner college serves over 60,000 credit Student quote: “I chose to be part of and non-credit students annually. Project DEgree because I believe it can help me strive for success and help me to become a better student.” Started in: 2011 Camden County College is one of Fall 2011 total students: 60 the largest community colleges in Average age at entry: 17.0 New Jersey. It serves over 23,000 Average GPA at entry: 7.1 (10.0 scale) credit-seeking students annually Two largest ethnic groups: at its three campus locations and Black/African American 81.6% offers over 140 programs and Hispanic/Latino 18.4% certificates. First generation college-goer: 82.8% Camden, New Jersey Student quote: “Gateway to College is the best program for those who dropped Gateway partner out of high school but are serious about their education and want to live an educated life.” Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 33
  • 39. partner profiles Cayuga Community College offers over 30 degree and certificate programs at two campuses and online. Popular programs at the school include liberal arts, education, broadcasting, studio art and design, business, nursing, and criminal justice. The college serves over 4,000 students a year. Auburn, New York Innovation Collaborative partner Chattahoochee Technical College is the largest technical college in Georgia, serving approximately 13,000 students a year. The college serves six Marietta, Georgia counties, has eight campuses and offers over 125 degree, diploma, and certificate programs to its students. Innovation Collaborative partner Christel House Dropout Recovery School, part of Christel House International, is a tuition-free charter school located in Indianapolis. They will partner with Ivy Tech Community College to serve students through the Gateway to College program. Christel House International currently serves Indianapolis, Indiana more than 3,000 students worldwide by providing them with education, nutrition, health care, and a nurturing environment, and by empowering Gateway partner their families and communities through outreach services. Will begin serving students in Fall 201234 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 40. partner profiles July 23 - 25, 2012 Started in: 2009 City College of San Francisco Fall 2011 total students: 144 is one of the largest community Average age at entry: 17.3 college systems in the western Average GPA at entry: 1.43 United States. The college offers Two largest ethnic groups: over 100 degree and certificate Black/African American 30.7% programs and serves more than Hispanic/Latino 28.7% 100,000 students (credit and First generation college-goer: 92.7% non-credit) each year. CCSF has Student quote: “Gateway to College is a 9 campuses anchored by the San Francisco, California great way to get a second chance. It will get you back up on your feet.” main campus in south central Gateway partner San Francisco, and also holds classes at 100 community-based centers throughout the city. Gateway to College Community College of Philadelphia Started in: 2006 is the largest institution of higher Fall 2011 total students: 101 education in Philadelphia and the Average age at entry: 17.7 largest point of entry to higher Average GPA at entry: 1.37 education for people of color Two largest ethnic groups: in Pennsylvania. Approximately Black/African American 59.4% 35,000 students are enrolled in White/Caucasian 24.1% credit and non-credit courses Philadelphia, Pennsylvania First generation college-goer: 81.0% annually at the college’s main Gateway and Student quote: “I absolutely love campus and 3 regional campuses. Gateway to College. They keep you Over 70 degree and certificateInnovation Collaborative partner wanting to be more involved. They make programs are offered in art, learning fun, yet hard, while giving us so much knowledge at the same time.” science, business, technology, and liberal arts. The Institute for Extended Learning offers over 5,700 credit and noncredit courses at its twelve centers throughout the Spokane region. Spokane, Washington Over 14,500 students (credit and noncredit) take classes each year to achieve a GED, high school diploma, or just for fun.Innovation Collaborative partner Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 35
  • 41. partner profiles Contra Costa College is one of three colleges that make up the San Pablo, California Contra Costa Community College District. They offer over 60 programs of study and have been serving students in the San Pablo Gateway partner and surrounding areas for over 60 years. Will begin serving students in Fall 2012 Corning Community College offers a spectrum of courses and programs ranging from liberal arts and sciences to career programs. It has five academic divisions and offers over 40 programs and more than 800 credit and non-credit courses. 3,000-5,000 students are enrolled in credit and non-credit courses annually. Corning, New York Innovation Collaborative partner Started in: 2010 Des Moines Area Community Fall 2011 total students: 42 College serves nearly Average age at entry: 17.6 31,000 students annually across Average GPA at entry: 1.36 6 campuses and several satellite Two largest ethnic groups: centers in the Des Moines White/Caucasian 38.6% metropolitan area and surrounding Des Moines, Iowa Black/African American 31.8% counties. The college offers more First generation college-goer: 88.8% Gateway partner than 130 degree programs and Student quote: “Gateway has been a certifications. very eye-opening experience, helping me sort my priorities and discover what I want to do with my life. The best part is that they stay involved and make sure you’re doing well not only in school, but outside as well.”36 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 42. partner profiles July 23 - 25, 2012 Gateway to College Durham Technical Community Started in: 2010 College offers 100-plus credit Fall 2011 total students: 107 certificate, diploma, and degree Average age at entry: 17.7 programs, and serves over 25,000Durham, North Carolina Average GPA at entry: 1.18 credit and non-credit students Two largest ethnic groups: annually. Locations include the Gateway and Black/African American 63.9% main campus in Durham, a secondProject DEgree partner White/Caucasian 13.3% campus in Orange County, and First generation college-goer: 85.7% several satellite centers. Student quote: “Gateway to College gives you a second chance to go where you want to go in life and it can even help you do better.” Project DEgree Started in: 2010 Fall 2011 total students: 35 Average age at entry: 21.0 Two largest ethnic groups: Black/African American 84.0% Hispanic/Latino 7.4% Multiracial 7.4% First generation college-goer: 75.0% Student quote: “I chose to be a part of Project DEgree because it felt like an opportunity to make something of myself.” Started in: 2011 El Paso Community College offers Fall 2011 total students: 57 more than 130 academic programs Average age at entry: 17.0 and over 350 personal enrichment/ Average GPA at entry: 65.1 (100.0 scale) community education courses. The Two largest ethnic groups: college has 5 campuses and serves Hispanic/Latino 77.7% more than 32,000 credit and Black/African American 6.3% non-credit students. White/Caucasian 6.3% El Paso, Texas First generation college-goer: 90.4% Student quote: “Gateway to College is Gateway partner a great opportunity for those who really want to succeed in life.” Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 37
  • 43. partner profiles Gateway to College Essex County College offers more Started in: 2009 than 70 programs of study through Fall 2011 total students: 125 its main campus in Newark, a Average age at entry: 17.7 suburban branch campus, and Average GPA at entry: 1.16 satellite operations throughout Two largest ethnic groups: the county. The college currently Black/African American 69.5% serves over 11,000 credit-seeking Newark, New Jersey Hispanic/Latino 27.0% students, plus thousands more First generation college-goer: 93.6% who are enrolled in adult literacy Gateway and Student quote: “I truly love it at GtC. I and ESL classes, customized job Project DEgree partner learn the right way and it’s the greatest training, and numerous programs feeling.” for professional development and personal enrichment. Project DEgree Started in: 2011 Fall 2011 total students: 51 Average age at entry: 20.3 Two largest ethnic groups: Black/African American 74.2% Hispanic/Latino 19.4% First generation college-goer: 73.7% Student quote: “Once I met the advisor, I was sold. This program will be a GREAT help for me in succeeding in my life. I can’t wait for more to come.” Started in: 2011 Florida State College at Fall 2011 total students: 90 Jacksonville has the largest Average age at entry: 17.0 workforce development program, Average GPA at entry: 1.80 online learning program, military Two largest ethnic groups: education program, and information Black/African American 50.7% technology curriculum in Florida. White/Caucasian 34.6% The college serves over 80,000 First generation college-goer: 77.6% credit and non-credit students and Student quote: “Overall, I feel that offers associate degree programs, Jacksonville, Florida Gateway to College is such a great experience. The faculty here is amazing, certificate programs, and eight and I love going to school here.” bachelor degree programs. Gateway partner38 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 44. partner profiles July 23 - 25, 2012 Started in: 2008 Front Range Community College, Fall 2011 total students: 92 located just outside Denver, serves Average age at entry: 17.2 more than 23,000 students at three Average GPA at entry: 1.48 campuses and one satellite center. Two largest ethnic groups: The college offers associate degree White/Caucasian 47.4% and certificate programs in over Hispanic/Latino 43.1% 100 areas. First generation college-goer: 79.0% Westminster, Colorado Student quote: “Gateway to College has been an amazing experience where I’ve grown and become prepared for college Gateway partner life. Gateway opens you up and gives you awesome pathways.” Gateway Community and Technical College is a member of the Kentucky Community and Technical College System. The college serves about 4,800 credit seeking students annually and offers associate degree Park Hills, Kentucky programs, certificates, and other diplomas at its three campuses.Innovation Collaborative partner Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 39
  • 45. partner profiles Gateway to College Georgia Perimeter College has Started in: 2005 more than 25,000 students and is Fall 2011 total students: 119 the third-largest institution in the Average age at entry: 17.1 University System of Georgia. It has Average GPA at entry: 1.56 four campuses and additional sites Two largest ethnic groups: located around Atlanta and offers Black/African American 89.4% 38 associate degrees, 4 career Clarkston, Georgia White/Caucasian 4.4% and technical degrees, and 9 dual First generation college-goer: 72.9% degrees with DeKalb Tech. Gateway and Student quote: “Overall, Gateway to Project DEgree partner College helped me gain confidence when it came to school. It helped to prepare me for the real college life.” Project DEgree Started in: 2011 Fall 2011 total students: 31 Average age at entry: 19.9 Two largest ethnic groups: Black/African American 75.8% Hispanic/Latino 15.2% First generation college-goer: 81.8% Student quote: “I chose to be a part of Project DEgree because it is the perfect opportunity to better my education in a program where others have the same challenges that I face.” Started in: 2011 Highline Community College Fall 2011 total students: 45 provides associate degrees that Average age at entry: 17.0 prepare students for transfer to a Average GPA at entry: 1.40 four-year university, Associate Two largest ethnic groups: of Applied Science degrees, Des Moines, Washington Hispanic/Latino 28.9% and certificates in approximately Black/African American 26.7% 40 professional-technical education Gateway partner First generation college-goer: 87.5% programs. Highline serves over Student quote: “Gateway has changed 18,000 students (credit and my life in so many ways. I actually like to get up and go to school every morning.” non-credit) annually and also offers pre-college, basic education, short-term training programs, and continuing education.40 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 46. partner profiles July 23 - 25, 2012 Hinds Community College is the largest community college in the state of Mississippi. It has five different campus and center locations, offers over Raymond, Mississippi 70 programs, and serves more than 12,000 credit-seeking students each semester. Gateway andInnovation Collaborative partner The Gateway program will begin serving students in Fall 2012. Started in: 2008 Holyoke Community College is Fall 2011 total students: 53 located on a 135-acre campus and Average age at entry: 17.3 serves over 9,000 students annually Average GPA at entry: 1.07 from more than 70 cities and towns Two largest ethnic groups: in western Massachusetts. Holyoke Holyoke, Massachusetts Hispanic/Latino 50.7% offers more than 100 associate White/Caucasian 24.9% degree and certificate options and Gateway partner First generation college-goer: 77.4% has the highest transfer rate of Student quote: “Gateway to College has any community college in prepared me very well for the outside Massachusetts. world and not just school. It has helped me grow into a mature young woman.” Started in: 2009 Lake Washington Institute Fall 2011 total students: 159 of Technology is located in Average age at entry: 17.5 Washington State’s high tech Average GPA at entry: 1.28 corridor, with a main campus in Kirkland, Washington Two largest ethnic groups: Kirkland and branch campuses White/Caucasian 75.0% in Redmond and Duvall. Lake Gateway partner Hispanic/Latino 12.8% Washington serves more than First generation college-goer: 72.7% 4,000 students every year and Student quote: “Gateway to College has offers training in 38 programs, given me a second chance in becoming successful. I am now more motivated with more than 100 professional/ and enthusiastic towards my path of technical degree and certificate education.” options. Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 41
  • 47. partner profiles Started in: 2009 Laney College is the largest of the Fall 2011 total students: 97 four colleges in the Peralta Average age at entry: 17.8 Community College District. It Average GPA at entry: 1.51 serves more than 14,000 students Two largest ethnic groups: each semester through its 60-acre Black/African American 48.2% campus and offers 44 associate Hispanic/Latino 28.0% degree and 35 certificate programs. First generation college-goer: 89.6% Student quote: “I love the individual attention that the Gateway to College Oakland, California personnel gives to us. Gateway is a good way to earn your high school diploma and Gateway partner grow in both academic and social ways.” Started in: 2007 Massasoit Community College, Fall 2011 total students: 101 located just south of Boston, offers Average age at entry: 17.3 more than 60 career and transfer Average GPA at entry: 1.37 programs including associate Two largest ethnic groups: degrees, certificates, and short- White/Caucasian 39.1% term training programs. It is one Brockton, Massachusetts Black/African American 29.4% of the largest of the 15 community First generation college-goer: 86.9% colleges within the Massachusetts Gateway partner Student quote: “You gave me a chance at Public Higher Education system, a new life. I couldn’t have lasted through with approximately 7,500 credit- high school…I get to forget my past and have a fresh start… Thank you from the seeking students enrolled each bottom of my heart.” semester at the college’s two campuses. Mesa Community College provides transfer, career, and service programs Omaha, Nebraska to the East Valley area of Phoenix. The college offers over 200 degrees and certificates and serves more than 27,000 students annually. Mesa, Arizona Innovative Collaborative partner42 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 48. partner profiles July 23 - 25, 2012 Started in: 2010 Metropolitan Community College Fall 2011 total students: 43 has 3 campuses and 4 centers, Average age at entry: 17.9 serving approximately 47,000 credit Average GPA at entry: 1.38 and non-credit students each year. Two largest ethnic groups: The college offers more than Omaha, Nebraska White/Caucasian 52.5% 100 one- and two-year career and Gateway partner Black/African American 32.2% academic transfer programs. First generation college-goer: 81.5% Student quote: “I feel like Gateway to College saved my life. I have struggled here and failed classes but they haven’t given up on me and I’m not going to give up on my education.” Monroe Community College offers more than 80 degree and certificate programs and serves approximately 19,000 credit-seeking students a year Rochester, New York at its Brighton and Damon City campuses.Innovation Collaborative partner Started in: 2004 Montgomery College serves nearly Fall 2011 total students: 60 60,000 students a year (credit and Average age at entry: 16.9 non-credit) at its Germantown, Average GPA at entry: 1.49 Rockville, and Takoma Park Rockville, Maryland Two largest ethnic groups: campuses and offers 130 majors White/Caucasian 44.7% and programs. Black/African American 27.0% Gateway partner First generation college-goer: 59.8% Student quote: “Gateway to College has completely changed my life and my outlook on life. I now believe I can be something and strive to be the best I can be, academically, and as a person.” Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 43
  • 49. partner profiles Mott Community College serves Genesee County and the surrounding community by creating high quality educational opportunities that strengthen the area’s economy. The college offers more than 100 different academic and occupational programs that focus on university transfer, technical and Flint, Michigan lifelong learning, as well as workforce and economic development. Gateway partner Will begin serving students in Fall 2012 Mountain View College currently serves over 8,000 students. The college offers a variety of courses that can lead to an Associate in Arts, Associate Dallas, Texas in Sciences, Associate in Applied Sciences, and Associate of Arts in Teaching Degrees. The college also offers emphasis degrees, field of study Innovation Collaborative partner degrees, and certificates and skills achievement awards. Started in: 2006 Mount Wachusett Community Fall 2011 total students: 67 College serves nearly 11,000 Average age at entry: 17.1 students (credit and non-credit) Average GPA at entry: annually from 29 cities and towns Gardner, Massachusetts 1.89 (4.0 scale) 63.96 (100.0 scale) in North Central Massachusetts. Two largest ethnic groups: In addition to offering over Gateway partner White/Caucasian 79.8% 40 degree and certificate programs, Hispanic/Latino 12.7% the college houses Adult Basic First generation college-goer: 72.0% Education and GED programs, Student quote: “Overall, the Gateway training and professional program has been the best years of my life. I proved to the world that dreams development, and non-credit are achievable; all it takes is to believe in community service programs. yourself.”44 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 50. partner profiles July 23 - 25, 2012 Project DEgree Owens Community College offers Started in: 2010 associate degree, continuing Fall 2011 total students: 49 education, and professional Average age at entry: 19.5 development options in more than Two largest ethnic groups: 130 program areas. The college Black/African American 38.5% serves over 45,000 credit and Toledo, Ohio White/Caucasian 36.9% non-credit students annually First generation college-goer: 83.3% between its two campuses in Gateway and Student quote: “I needed a program like Toledo and Findlay. Project DEgree partner this to get my college education started and put me in the right direction.”The Gateway program will begin serving students in Fall 2012. Started in: 2005 Palo Alto College, a single-campus Fall 2011 total students: 58 college located in south-central Average age at entry: 17.0 San Antonio, is one of five colleges Average GPA at entry: in the Alamo Colleges. Palo Alto 1.73 (4.0 scale) 74.22 (100.0 scale) serves over 8,000 students per San Antonio, Texas Two largest ethnic groups: semester and has the highest Hispanic/Latino 87.0% transfer rate to four-year schools for Gateway partner White/Caucasian 8.8% Hispanics in the state of Texas. First generation college-goer: 91.2% Student quote: “I think the choice I made to join the program was the best choice I’ve made so far. Coming here has helped me out so much to just get me back on track.” Started in: 2011 Phoenix College prepares more Fall 2011 total students: 65 than 30,000 students a year for Average age at entry: 22.1 university transfer, career training Two largest ethnic groups: and advancement, and lifelong Hispanic/Latino 65.3% learning in one of the 200 degree Black/African American 12.2% and certificate programs it offers. First generation college-goer: 94.6% The college is officially designated a Student quote: “I chose to be in Project Hispanic Serving Institution. DEgree because I have been out of Phoenix, Arizona school for 8 years and needed a program to get me back in the groove of things.” Project DEgree partner Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 45
  • 51. partner profiles Pima Community College has an annual enrollment of over 68,000 students (credit and non-credit). It has 6 campuses, four Tucson, Arizona education centers, and a combined 115 teaching locations around Tucson, and offers 195 transfer and occupational programs. Innovation Collaborative partner Gateway to College Portland Community College is the Started in: 2000 largest institution of higher learning Fall 2011 total students: 269 in Oregon, with an enrollment Average age at entry: 17.1 of 87,000 credit and non-credit Average GPA at entry: 1.71 students annually. The college has Two largest ethnic groups: three full campuses and multiple Portland, Oregon White/Caucasian 65.6% training centers and community- Hispanic/Latino 10.6% based programs across the Portland Gateway and First generation college-goer: 66.9% metropolitan area. Project DEgree partner Student quote: “My experience with GtC has been something I won’t forget. It felt like a second chance and brought back what I thought I had lost.” Project DEgree Started in: 2010 Fall 2011 total students: 83 Average age at entry: 20.9 Two largest ethnic groups: White/Caucasian 39.1% Black/African American 23.4% First generation college-goer: 74.5% Student quote: “I loved it the first time I heard about it. Everything about Project DEgree is what I need and it’s what I’ve been missing.”46 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 52. partner profiles July 23 - 25, 2012 Started in: 2009 Pueblo Community College offers Fall 2011 total students: 88 more than 50 certificate and Average age at entry: 17.6 associate degree programs, and is Average GPA at entry: 1.33 a state leader in health care Two largest ethnic groups: education. The college’s main Hispanic/Latino 66.0% White/Caucasian 29.2% campus in Pueblo serves Pueblo, Colorado First generation college-goer: 82.0% approximately 3,600 students per Student quote: “Gateway to College was year. The two branch campuses, Gateway partner definitely what I needed. There was no located in Cañon City and Durango, high school drama nonsense to distract serve more than 1,700 students per me and I felt comfortable asking for help. year and provide transfer, career, I’ve learned a lot.” and technical programs. Quinsigamond Community College, located in central Massachusetts, serves over 13,000 students annually through its Credit and Non-Credit/Worcester, Massachusetts Workforce Training divisions. Over 70 associate degree and certificate career Gateway partner options are available in the fields of Business, Technology, Liberal Arts, Health Care, and Human Services.Will begin serving students in Fall 2012 Started in: 2004 Riverside City College, which is Fall 2011 total students: 137 part of a three campus District, Average age at entry: 17.1 is located 60 miles east of Average GPA at entry: 1.56 Los Angeles in Riverside County. Two largest ethnic groups: Serving more than 19,000 students Hispanic/Latino 45.1% each semester, the college White/Caucasian 31.5% provides students with a wide First generation college-goer: 84.2% range of choices including career Student quote: “Gateway to College is certificates, associate’s degree Riverside, California a great system with well trained faculty. programs, and transfer to four-year They care and are able to support and guide me through my academic and institutions. Gateway partner non-academic struggles.” Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 47
  • 53. partner profiles Started in: 2011 San Antonio College is one of the Fall 2011 total students: 36 largest single-campus community Average age at entry: 19.6 colleges in the country and the Two largest ethnic groups: largest in the state of Texas, Hispanic/Latino 85.4% enrolling 21,000 credit-seeking White/Caucasian 8.3% students each semester. San Antonio, Texas First generation college-goer: 82.1% Student quote: “I chose to be in Project Project DEgree partner DEgree because it’s a program where I will have an open, safe, and comfortable relationship with my professors.” Scottsdale Community College enrolls 10,000 credit and 3,000 non-credit students each semester. It offers over 45 degrees and over 60 certificates. In addition to traditional programs of study, Scottsdale Community College offers continuing education for practicing professionals, developmental education, and English as a Second Language. Scottsdale, Arizona Innovation Collaborative partner Started in: 2011 South Texas College has five Fall 2011 total students: 56 campuses and offers more than Average age at entry: 18.0 100 degree and certification Average GPA at entry: 57.3 (100.0 scale) programs, distance learning, Two largest ethnic groups: and continuing and professional Hispanic/Latino 96.2% education opportunities. It is the McAllen, Texas White/Caucasian 1.9% only community college in Texas First generation college-goer: 93.2% Gateway partner that offers two Bachelor of Applied Student quote: “My experience with Technology degrees. Gateway to College has been amazing. I’ve grown and matured so much in so many ways that I now feel capable of being in an adult environment.”48 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 54. partner profiles July 23 - 25, 2012 Started in: 2009 Spartanburg Community College Fall 2011 total students: 44 has three campuses serving the Average age at entry: 17.4 counties of Spartanburg, Average GPA at entry: 1.85 Cherokee, and Union in Upstate Two largest ethnic groups: South Carolina. Annually, the White/Caucasian 53.7% college serves 5,000 credit-seeking Black/African American 35.5% students in over 80 programs First generation college-goer: 81.3% of study and more thanSpartanburg, South Carolina Student quote: “Gateway to College is 15,000 students in continuing absolutely the best opportunity! I could education and lifelong learning Gateway partner not see myself accomplishing much of anything before I started the Gateway programs. program. Now I have so many options that I do not know which path to take.” Project DEgree Spokane Falls Community College Started in: 2010 is one of two accredited institutions Fall 2011 total students: 68 that comprise the Community Average age at entry: 18.8 Colleges of Spokane. The college Two largest ethnic groups: offers over 40 Liberal Arts/Transfer Spokane, Washington White/Caucasian 70.2% pre-majors and 40 Professional/ Hispanic/Latino 10.6% Technical job training programs, Gateway and Black/African American 10.6% and serves over 8,000 students Project Degree partner First generation college-goer: 71.8% annually. Student quote: “I want to be the best IThe Gateway program will begin can be for myself and to prove to others I serving students in Fall 2012. can do it and be successful.” Started in: 2008 St. Louis Community College is the Fall 2011 total students: 55 largest community college district Average age at entry: 17.4 in Missouri and one of the largest Average GPA at entry: 1.20 in the United States. The college St. Louis, Missouri Two largest ethnic groups: offers over 100 career programs Black/African American 86.4% to approximately 28,000 credit- Gateway partner White/Caucasian 8.7% seeking students at its four First generation college-goer: 81.3% campuses and additional satellite Student quote: “GtC gave me the centers. chance to grow up a little, be treated like an adult with my own responsibilities, and show I can succeed.” Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 49
  • 55. 8th ANNUAL • PEER LEARNING CONFERENCEGtCNN PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING AND LEARNINGThese principles provide the framework for teaching and learning in Gateway to College National Network (GtCNN)programs. They do not specify content. Rather, they are precepts based on research and best practices thatshould be used by faculty, resource specialists, and directors to guide the design, facilitation, and assessmentof all learning in GtCNN programs. While, taken together, these principles describe an ideal, they articulate whateach GtCNN program should strive to achieve. Like our students, GtCNN programs are at different stages ofdevelopment. As instructional leaders, GtCNN directors should lead their teams in assessing how well they aremeeting each of the principles and, in the spirit of continuous improvement, identifying areas and strategies forimprovement. Gateway to College National Network supports those improvement efforts through face to facetraining, webinars, brown bag trainings, referrals to resources, tailored data analysis, and peer learning.Integrated, Outcomes-based Curriculum and InstructionInstructors work together to develop an integrated, coherent curriculum centered on interdisciplinary themes,enabling students to apply what they learn in one course to their learning in other courses. All instruction isdesigned around the essential question: What do students need to know and be able to do to be successfulcollege students? Outcomes clearly define what students will be able to do “out there,” once they complete aclass rather than what they will do in class. Students are able to articulate the intended outcome(s) for alllearning experiences and describe how those outcomes are relevant to their goals. All instructional activities areintentionally designed to help students understand the concepts or develop the skills required to achieve theintended outcomes rather than to “cover” a body of information.RigorInstructors are aware of incoming student ability levels and tailor learning challenges to the student’sdevelopmental level. Students build problem-solving and critical thinking skills including analysis, synthesis,and evaluation, as they engage in meaningful projects or explore driving questions. Instructors cultivate an “ethicof excellence” in which students develop habits and internal standards for producing high quality work which, inturn, serves as a source of pride. By holding students to high expectations while offering high levels ofencouragement and support, instructors enable students to meet those expectations, gain confidence aslearners, and view themselves as belonging in college, thereby setting the stage for success.Relationships - Collaborative, Inclusive Learning CommunitiesA caring, solution-focused approach to working with students is the foundation for all learning. Instructors developpersonal connections with students and foster an environment that values and respects individual differences.Instructors design learning activities that teach and reinforce the skills and habits required for effective collaborativelearning. They teach students how to build a supportive community that lives within and outside of the classroom(e.g., in study groups).50 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 56. 8th ANNUAL • PEER LEARNING CONFERENCE July 23 - 25, 2012GtCNN PRINCIPLES OF TEACHING AND LEARNING (continued)Relevance - Project-based, Active LearningStudents develop knowledge, understanding, and skills through active engagement with meaningful,interdisciplinary, collaborative projects or driving questions, rather than through disconnected, isolatedassignments.Constructing MeaningInstructors teach students how to understand new concepts by adding to, modifying, or reorganizing existingknowledge and concepts. They help students solve new problems by drawing on previous experiences and theymake the learning process explicit so that students are able to recognize the connections between new learningand existing concepts and skills. Instructional activities are flexible enough to provide students with opportunitiesto learn in ways that are meaningful to them.Personal GrowthInstructors help students overcome self-defeating beliefs by recognizing that academic success is attributable tocontrollable factors such as hard work, persistence, and resilience rather than innate ability or luck. By promotinghabits such as setting SMART goals, organization, and self-advocacy, instructors help students identifythemselves as independent, successful college students. In order to empower students to take responsibility fortheir own learning, instructors help students discover and understand their learning style, the conditions underwhich they best learn, and their role in the learning process. Instructors teach students specific strategies forlearning, reasoning, and problem solving. They structure opportunities for students to reflect on and evaluate theirlearning and identify strategies for improvement.AssessmentInstructors design projects and other performance tasks that provide evidence that the student is capable ofachieving the intended outcome(s). Through the use of rubrics, students can distinguish “what is good” for aparticular project and can differentiate between high quality and poor work. Instructors structure opportunities forstudents to make their work public within and outside of the classroom and teach students how to give andreceive constructive feedback. In the pursuit of excellence, instructors and student peers provide formativefeedback on multiple drafts of projects, rather than a “one and done” approach. Feedback is solution-focused,helping students recognize how strengths and past successes provide keys to overcoming new challenges.Data-based decision-making guides the improvement of student and program outcomes. Instructors regularly andcollaboratively reflect on direct evidence of learning (individual student performance on projects, tests, and otherperformance tasks) and indirect evidence of learning (student reflections and feedback). The Cycle of Inquiry isregularly used to analyze aggregate measures of student progress, including course success rates and studentsuccess on the comprehensive campus. Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 51
  • 57. 8th ANNUAL • PEER LEARNING CONFERENCE The Power of Persistence: Three Keys to Achievement and GrowthThink Big and Make Steady ProgressSet a big goal, make steady progress, and celebrate successes (big and small) along the way. You take a riskevery time you try something new so it is common to feel some anxiety. Lean into the discomfort. Struggle is anormal and necessary part of your journey to mastering what matters to you – it’s not a sign of failure, it’s the markof growth.____ What is your BIG goal?____ What risks does this big goal require you to take?____ Describe some early signs of success on the way to achieving your goal.____ Describe how you will celebrate those early successes.____ If you encounter roadblocks along the way, what will you do to get back up and keep going?____ What will mastery of your big goal look like? How will your life be different?Concentrate on the ControllableLike everyone else, you have positive and negative forces in your life which both push you toward and pull youfrom your goals. Strengthening or weakening a force within your control will offset the effects of another onepresently outside of your control.____ List the positive forces that you can add or strengthen in your life that will help you push forward toward your goal.____ List the negative forces that you can remove or offset in your life that will keep you from being pulled from your goal.Surround Yourself with Positive PeopleMentors, role models, supporters, and stories of success help you envision what’s possible and inspire you topersist, even when the going gets tough. Pay it forward by serving as a role model to someone else by sharingyour own stories of achievement and contributing to the cycle of success.____ Who can you watch and learn from who is already successful in what you want to accomplish?____ Who are the supporters in your life (inside and outside of your college) that will inspire and encourage you?____ Name one success story (your own or someone you know) that you’d be willing to share with others. Write your story.52 / Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II
  • 58. 8th ANNUAL • PEER LEARNING CONFERENCE Three Keys: Tapping into Motivation Action Planner for Achievement Think Big and Make Steady ProgressWhat is your goal? Early signs of success Evidence of struggle Plans to celebrate and/or pick up and keep going Concentrate on the ControllablePositive forces in your life Negative forces What you can and will do Surround Yourself with Positive People Those who inspire you Your supporters What you will do Gateway to College Peer Learning Conference / The Power of Persistence II / 53
  • 59. Gateway to College National Network 529 SE Grand Avenue, Suite 300 Portland, OR 97214 ( 971) 634-1212 www.gatewaytocollege.org

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