Euro IA Closing Plenary - What I'm Curious About…

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What are you curious about? What do you want to know more about by this time next year?

Here's my answer to that question (c. 2012) and why I believe Curiosity is core to everything we do as a profession.

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  • Nice work. The deck on slide 2 with social proof card..I was curious what is it called?
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  • Amazing and insightful
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  • Excellent stuff!
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Euro IA Closing Plenary - What I'm Curious About…

  1. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUTA PRESENTATION BY:Stephen P. AndersonEURO IA SUMMIT 2013 #euroia @stephenanderson
  2. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUTA PRESENTATION BY:Stephen P. AndersonEURO IA SUMMIT 2013 #euroia @stephenanderson
  3. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUTA PRESENTATION BY:Stephen P. AndersonEURO IA SUMMIT 2013 #euroia @stephenanderson
  4. Euro IA 2012What are you curious about?What do you want to know more aboutby this time next year?
  5. Once the basic skills have been mastered,designers can use their imaginations toexplore and create their own masterpieces.
  6. The more things designers knowabout, the more they can use them increative thinking and play
  7. The fewer materials and choicesavailable, the more imagination isneeded by the designer.
  8. explore new ideas and skills... make lots of use worlds of different things based on activities fantasy to inspire and objects already familiar a vital part of the creative process is to ‘make’ something learn how things are madetry out your own ideas learn from our failures experiment express creativity by drawing pictures, writing stories… play on their own... or with a group of real friends inspiration for creativity comes from many different sourceslook outside your own experience versions of everyday things allow children to create their own worlds
  9. NEVER STOPPLAYINGAND LEARNING
  10. NEVER STOPPLAYINGAND LEARNING
  11. NEVER STOPPLAYINGAND LEARNING
  12. N CE!NEVER STOP IA EN AL ER IT EF RPLAYINGAND LEARNING
  13. NEVER STOPPLAYINGAND LEARNING
  14. “You might summarize all of the skills weve noted in one word: "inquisitiveness." I spent 20 years studying great global leaders, and that was the big common denominator.” http://blogs.hbr.org/hbr/hbreditors/2009/09/how_do_innovators_think.html
  15. “You might summarize all of the skills weve noted in one word: "inquisitiveness." I spent 20 years studying great global leaders, and that was the big common denominator.” http://blogs.hbr.org/hbr/hbreditors/2009/09/how_do_innovators_think.html
  16. “You might summarize all of the skills weve noted in one word: "inquisitiveness." I spent 20 years studying great global leaders, and that was the big common denominator.” http://blogs.hbr.org/hbr/hbreditors/2009/09/how_do_innovators_think.html
  17. http://blogs.wsj.com/ideas-market/2011/04/05/the-montessori-mafia/
  18. A number of the innovative entrepreneurs also went to Montessori schools, where they learned to follow their curiosityhttp://blogs.wsj.com/ideas-market/2011/04/05/the-montessori-mafia/
  19. Montessori taught me the joy of discovery… It’s all about learning on your terms, rather than a teacher explaining stuff to you. SimCity comes right out of Montessori…videogame pioneer Will Wright
  20. We both went to Montessori school, and I think it was part of that training of not following rules and orders, and being self-motivated, questioning what’s going on in the world, doing things a little bit differently.Google’s founders Larry Pageand Sergei Brin
  21. …that discovery mentality is precisely the environment that Montessori seeks to create. Similarly, Amazon’s culture breathes experimentation and discovery. Mr. Bezos often compares Amazon’s strategy of developing ideas in new markets to “planting seeds” or “going down blind alleys.” Amazon’s executives learn and uncover opportunities as they go. Many efforts turn out to be dead ends, Mr.Amazon’s Jeff Bezos Bezos has said, “But every once in a while, you go down an alley and it opens up into this huge, broad avenue.”
  22. MONTESSORI?
  23. Mixed age classroomsSpecialized educationalmaterialsStudent choice of activity fromwithin a prescribed range ofoptionsUninterrupted blocks of worktimeA Constructivist or "discovery"model, where students learnconcepts from working withmaterials, rather than by directinstructionMONTESSORI?
  24. Mixed age classroomsSpecialized educationalmaterialsStudent choice of activity fromwithin a prescribed range ofoptionsUninterrupted blocks of worktimeA Constructivist or "discovery"model, where students learnconcepts from working withmaterials, rather than by directinstructionMONTESSORI?
  25. Mixed age classroomsSpecialized educationalmaterialsStudent choice of activity fromwithin a prescribed range ofoptionsUninterrupted blocks of worktimeA Constructivist or "discovery" E!model, where students learn AN NC LI REconcepts from working with TA FE I Ematerials, rather than by direct RinstructionMONTESSORI?
  26. I sort of know the subject[graphic design]. I knew nothingabout film, so that that seemedchallenging and worthwhile. STEFAN SAGMEISTER
  27. At the end of the day, thereason I do it is that I learn,that I keep learning... MARIA POPOVA, EDITOR OF BRAINPICKINGS.ORG
  28. PLAYINGAND LEARNING
  29. CURIOSITYPLAYINGAND LEARNING
  30. CHALLENGING & WORTHWHILECURIOSITYPLAYINGAND LEARNINGEXPERIMENTATION &DISCOVERYINQUISITIVENESSSELF-MOTIVATED, QUESTIONINGWHAT’S GOING ON IN THE WORLD
  31. CHALLENGING & WORTHWHILE CURIOSITY PLAYING AND LEARNINGYES! THIS IS WHAT IT’S ABOUT. EXPERIMENTATION & DISCOVERY INQUISITIVENESS SELF-MOTIVATED, QUESTIONING WHAT’S GOING ON IN THE WORLD
  32. Euro IA 2012What are you curious about?What do you want to know more aboutby this time next year?
  33. Euro IA 2012Good UX is fundamentallyabout being curious
  34. Euro IA 2012Good UX is fundamentallyabout being curious“HOW?”“WHY?”“WHY NOT?”“WHAT IF?”
  35. Euro IA 2012Good UX is fundamentallyabout being curious“HOW?”“WHY?”“WHY NOT?”“WHAT IF?”
  36. Styles tend to not only separate men — because theyhave their own doctrines and then the doctrine becamethe gospel truth that you cannot change. But if you donot have a style, if you just say: Well, here I am as ahuman being, how can I express myself totally andcompletely? Now, that way you wont create a style,because style is a crystallization. That way, its a processof continuing growth.
  37. STYLE. FORM.=METHODS?TITLES? TOOLS?
  38. It’s five years in the future…Your Big Idea failed. TMWrite the obituary foryour Big Idea.
  39. It’s 2017.“User Experience” is dead.What happened?Write the obituary forUser Experience
  40. WHAT DO YOU DO?HOW DO YOU DO IT?WHY IS IT VALUABLE?
  41. VISUAL DESIGNERINFORMATION ARCHITECTCONTENT STRATEGISTUSABILITY ENGINEERINTERACTION DESIGNERCOPYWRITERDIRECTOR OF MARKETINGCTOPRODUCT MANAGERPROJECT MANAGERFRONT-END ENGINEERSOFTWARE ENGINEERPROGRAMMERPRODUCT STRATEGISTBACK-END DEVELOPERSYSTEMS ARCHITECTDIGITAL ARTISTSDATA SCIENTISTUX DESIGNERDESIGN RESEARCHERBUSINESS ANALYSTSQA ENGINEERGAME DESIGNERSALESACCOUNTINGACCOUNT EXECUTIVEETC.WHO CARES!?
  42. VISUAL DESIGNER INFORMATION ARCHITECTAre you… CONTENT STRATEGISTa curious, passionate USABILITY ENGINEER INTERACTION DESIGNERlearner (and maker!) who COPYWRITER DIRECTOR OF MARKETING CTOcan see possibilities? PRODUCT MANAGER PROJECT MANAGER FRONT-END ENGINEER SOFTWARE ENGINEEROr, PROGRAMMERsomething else? PRODUCT STRATEGIST BACK-END DEVELOPER SYSTEMS ARCHITECT DIGITAL ARTISTS DATA SCIENTIST UX DESIGNER DESIGN RESEARCHER BUSINESS ANALYSTS QA ENGINEER GAME DESIGNER SALES ACCOUNTING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE ETC. WHO CARES!?
  43. Tamed problems Wicked problems
  44. Tamed problems Wicked problemscan be solved with requiredesign patterns curious mindswhich are a which are acommodity service premium skilland andoffer little/no value create valuefor people, organizations, and the World! for people, organizations, and the World!
  45. Tamed problems Wicked problemscan be solved with requiredesign patterns curious mindswhich are a which are acommodity service premium skilland andoffer little/no value create valuefor people, organizations, and the World! for people, organizations, and the World!WHERE ARE YOUR SPENDING YOUR TIME?
  46. PRACTICAL TIP!
  47. That is the magic of our business–going from not knowing to knowing… Modalities change all the time.Richard Saul Wurmanat the IA Summit 2010
  48. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUT
  49. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUTInteractive Visualizations
  50. E! AN NC LI RE TA FEI E R
  51. Visualizing research papers referenced in a selection of books
  52. Visualizing research papers referenced in a selection of books
  53. Visualizing research papers referenced in a selection of books (sort by date released)
  54. Visualizing research papers referenced in a selection of books (sort by date released)
  55. Visualizing research papers referenced in a selection of books (sort by date released)
  56. Visualizing research papers referenced in a selection of books (sort by date released)
  57. http://vimeo.com/36579366
  58. Watch this!http://vimeo.com/36579366
  59. VISUALIZATIONS TO1.HELP PEOPLE UNDERSTANDWHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN,BUT HASN’T BEEN SHOWN.BUT ALSO,2.TO EXPLORE THE UNKNOWN!
  60. Today we know that cholera is spread through water, but in the early1800s people weren’t sure. John Snow’s cholera map helped to showthat contaminated wells were at the center of outbreaks. His researchhelped save countless lives and set the foundation for the field ofepidemiology.
  61. A single DNA sequencer cannow generate in a day whatit took 10 years to collect forthe Human Genome Project.
  62. http://datavisualization.ch/tools/pathline-connecting-designers-with-scientists/
  63. PresentC.R.U.D. TOOLS *CREATEREADUNDODELETE(ALSO BROWSE, SEARCH, & FILTER)
  64. Present FutureC.R.U.D. TOOLS *CREATE TOOLS FOR UNDERSTANDINGREAD COMPAREUNDO COMPREHENDDELETE EXPLORE(ALSO BROWSE, SEARCH, & FILTER) ANALYZE EVALUATE SYNTHESIZE
  65. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUT Perception & Cognition Learning and Thinking with the Whole Body (tie back to Montessori)
  66. Thinking, then doing.
  67. “By rearranging the board, the player acquired information that was otherwise difficult to perceive. Although she could have acquired this information by mentally simulating the move, it was simpler and faster to physically carry out the move and then reverse it. More importantly, the problem space is now partly in the head and partly in the world, with interaction linking and blending these two spaces together.Interacting with the environment—in this example, rearranging it to address animmediate epistemic need—can generate insight into a problem by treating theenvironment as a resource for reducing cognitive complexity. Instead of relyingexclusively on an internal representation, the player creates, and operates on, anexternal representation of the problem space. Thus, interaction creates bothphysical and informational changes in the environment. The player can thenleverage these informational changes to simplify cognitively complex tasks.”— KARL FAST, “Interaction and the epistemic potential of digital libraries”
  68. “By rearranging the board, the player acquired information that was otherwise difficult to perceive. Although she could have acquired this information by mentally simulating the move, it was simpler and faster to physically carry out the move and then reverse it. More importantly, the problem space is now partly in the head and partly in the world, with interaction linking and blending these two spaces together.Interacting with the environment—in this example, rearranging it to address animmediate epistemic need—can generate insight into a problem by treating theenvironment as a resource for reducing cognitive complexity. Instead of relyingexclusively on an internal representation, the player creates, and operates on, anexternal representation of the problem space. Thus, interaction creates bothphysical and informational changes in the environment. The player can thenleverage these informational changes to simplify cognitively complex tasks.”— KARL FAST, “Interaction and the epistemic potential of digital libraries” Read this! http://www.springerlink.com/content/4755373gw24g00l8/?MUD=MP
  69. Thinking, then doing.
  70. Thinking, then doing.Thinking through doing.
  71. PRAGMATIC(Actions performed to bring one physically closer to a goal) VS EPISTEMIC ACTIONS (Actions that use the world to improve cognition) Thinking, then doing.Thinking through doing.
  72. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUT Smart Objects / The Internet of Things
  73. http://pinterest.com/stephenpa/smart-objects/
  74. http://pinterest.com/stephenpa/smart-objects/
  75. Your Future Robotic HandWill Be Able To DetectEverything From AbnormalBreast Lumps To EnlargedLymph Nodes http://www.fastcoexist.com/1680406/your-future-robotic-hand-will-be-able-to-detect-everything-from-abnormal-breast-lumps-to-enl#6
  76. http://pinterest.com/stephenpa/smart-objects/
  77. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUT New Forms of Interaction
  78. Fascinating research on developing a new sense: http://feelspace.cogsci.uni-osnabrueck.de/
  79. http://www.core77.com/blog/technology/canon_announces_mixed_reality_system_for_industrial_design_teams_22722.asp
  80. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUT (3D Printing)
  81. WHAT I’MCURIOUSABOUT Education Reform, Online Learning, & EdTech
  82. Perception &WHAT I’M Cognition Learning and Thinking Interactive with the Whole Body Visualizations (tie back to Montessori)CURIOUSABOUTEducation Reform, New Forms of InteractionOnline Learning, & EdTech Smart Objects / (3D Printing) The Internet of Things
  83. Perception &WHAT I’M Interactive Visualizations Cognition Learning and Thinking with the Whole Body (tie back to Montessori)CURIOUSABOUT New Forms of InteractionEducation Reform,Online Learning, & EdTech Smart Objects / (3D Printing) The Internet of Things
  84. Perception &WHAT I’M Interactive Visualizations Cognition Learning and Thinking with the Whole Body (tie back to Montessori)CURIOUS SENSEABOUT MAKING!Education Reform, New Forms of InteractionOnline Learning, & EdTech Smart Objects / (3D Printing) The Internet of Things
  85. SENSEMAKING! Wurman recognized decades before the "information age" that people were becoming "inundated with data but starved for the tools and patterns that give them meaning." As a result, Wurman defined the Information Architect as "someone who enables data to be transformed into understandable information."
  86. Euro IA 2012What are you curious about?What do you want to know more aboutby this time next year?
  87. “WHAT SHOULD I BE CURIOUS ABOUT?” (It doesn’t matter, and as much as you can…)
  88. Just as our eyes need light in order to see, our minds need ideas in order to conceive.NAPOLEON HILL
  89. When you step into anintersection of fields,disciplines, or cultures,you can combine existingconcepts into a largenumber of extraordinarynew ideas.
  90. E!When you step into an AN NC LI REintersection of fields, ITA FEdisciplines, or cultures,REyou can combine existingconcepts into a largenumber of extraordinarynew ideas.
  91. E!When you step into an AN NC LI REintersection of fields, ITA FEdisciplines, or cultures,REyou can combine existingconcepts into a largenumber of extraordinarynew ideas.
  92. SOME EXAMPLES…
  93. Biomimic Infographicby Pete DenmanThe rings on a tree, the strata onearths crust, the pedals of a flower, thedepth of clutter on your desk, even thelines on your face all tell a story. Thesedetails when viewed in the organismswhole give the viewer a history as wellas an indication of well being. Asmembers of society and mothernature, we all inherently understandhow the fresh new green buds on aplant indicate growth and the olderweathered look of a tree trunk givesindication of a harsh winter. These arethings built into understanding of theworld. We as designers can takeadvantage of this natural “visualaffordance” and develop a userexperience that is can convey largeamounts of information that is easilyunderstandable.http://www.slideshare.net/mprove/ixd12denman
  94. …applied to UX design
  95. Alton Brown
  96. COOKING(and a loathing of bad TV cooking shows)
  97. “ Believe me, a grain is a terrible thing to waste.” So on one hand, honey is an amazingly“sophisticated and efficient food source. On the other hand, its bee backwash.”
  98. George Melies
  99. George Melies
  100. Euro IA 2012What are you curious about?What do you want to know more aboutby this time next year?
  101. 1919 - 1920 1919 - Temporary apprenticeship as a commercial artist (doing ads for newspapers & magazines) Jan 1920 - Briefly attempts creating agency with friend Ub Iwerks (Iwerks-Disney Commercial Artists) Employed by Kansas City Film Ad Company to create theatrical animations
  102. 1920-1923…While employed at Kansas City Film Ad Company Borrows stop motion camera from boss, to experiment w/ hand drawn (cel) animation - creates series of “Laugh-O-Grams”Launches studio: Laugh-O-Gram Films While the films are successful, the studio becomes loaded with debt and goes bankrupt. Edwin G. Lutz book Animated Cartoons: How They Are Made, Their Origin andAugust 1923 - Moves to Hollywood Development“The day I got on that Sante Fe, California, LTD. I wasjust free and happy. But I’d failed. I think it’s importantto have a good hard failure when you’re young.”
  103. 1923-1927Disney is very successful with the “Alice Comedies,”which bring live action into a cartoon.
  104. 1927 - 1928Oswald the Lucky Rabbit is an instant hit. FEB 1928 - Goes to NY to negotiate higher fee per short with distributor, only to have Oswald an nearly entire animation team taken from him
  105. Earliest sketch of Mickey Mouse from 1928
  106. 1928 E NT T HINK THIRTY FIV LOAN AS POSSIBLE. DO RST“ GET AS LARGE A FUTUR E DEPENDS ON FI DRED ENOUGH TR Y FOR MORE OUR SE” WALT DISNEY .HUN XPEN RE A M NOT SPARING EPICTURE THEREFO
  107. 1929 - 1939More than 75 “Silly Symphonies” are created as a way toexplore different advances sound, color, and animation
  108. PAINT JARSThe Walt Disney Studios wasthe first to experiment withtechnicolor, which was firstdone in 1932 for "Flowers andTrees".
  109. "The Old Mill" was the first cartoon on which Walt used the multiplanecamera. This concept art was done by Gustaf Tenggren, ca. 1937. This camera is one of the three original cameras used to achieve depth in animated films.
  110. 1934-1938in 1934 Disney began planning a full-lengthfeature Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
  111. UNDER WATER CAMERAThe first film to use an underwatercamera was Walts third live actionfilm-20,000 Leagues Under the Sea.
  112. GRIFFITH PARK BENCHWalt watched his daughters on a carousel in Griffith Park from thisbench, which is where he thought up the idea of a family-friendlypark... (Disneyland)!
  113. Around here, we dont look backwardsfor very long. We keep moving forward,opening up new doors and doing new things,because were curious... and curiosity keepsleading us down new paths.
  114. Euro IA 2012What are you curious about?What do you want to know more aboutby this time next year?
  115. Thank you!slideshare.net/stephenpa getmentalnotes.comStephen P Anderson .@stephenandersonwww.poetpainter.com

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