Voluntary choice and dangerous consumption Social marketing as an ideological and infrastructural device for engagement wi...
Parameters
Social Marketing <ul><li>“ adaptation and adoption of commercial marketing activities, institutions and processes as a mea...
Commercial Marketing <ul><li>&quot;Marketing is the management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satis...
Advertising != marketing <ul><li>Advertising </li></ul><ul><li>direct marketing </li></ul><ul><li>sales promotion </li></u...
Sponsorship it's a tax on companies who  can't do math on ROI
The Diffusion of Innovation Ultimate aim is: Change in Behaviour Diffusion of innovation model, Rogers (1995)
Fitting into the  social change agenda One technique, not the technique
Currently in use… <ul><li>National Prevention Agency </li></ul><ul><li>National Preventative Health </li></ul><ul><li>NHMR...
Sometimes, it’s without recognition Sport Panel - Independent Sport Panel Report (Crawford Report) http://www.sportpanel.o...
How do we* get people to change? <ul><li>Many models available which explain behaviour change from different perspectives ...
Three macro alternatives Education Persuasion Compulsion (legislation)
 
 
What do we want? When do we want it? (How are we going to get it?)
Carrot or stick:which approach to use? <ul><li>Education : most valuable when a new threat emerges and when people lack in...
Reducing dangerous consumptions <ul><li>Prescriptive regulatory approaches result in people swapping one dangerous consump...
Why  we  do it  our  way <ul><li>You can legislate, educate and pontificate, but in the end what works is when the kids se...
The Consequences of Social Marketing <ul><li>Fundamental Principle of Exchange </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing Models </li></u...
Exchange <ul><li>Conditions of the Exchange </li></ul><ul><li>Freedom to leave the exchange </li></ul><ul><li>The Right of...
Marketing Models <ul><li>Innovation Adoption </li></ul><ul><li>Stages of Change </li></ul>
Innovation Adoption Innovators. 5% 13% Early adopter Early majority 30% 35-40% 12% Late Majority Laggard
Stages of Change <ul><li>Pre-contemplation (awareness) </li></ul><ul><li>Contemplation (education and persuasion) </li></u...
They know what to do,  so why won’t they do it? <ul><li>They don’t actually know what to do </li></ul><ul><ul><li>we just ...
They know what to do,  so why won’t they do it? <ul><li>Certainty v risk  </li></ul><ul><li>A sacrifice now doesn’t guaran...
Marketing methods Two overlooked methods
The Product Dangerous Consumption Idea Practice Object Belief Attitude Value Act Behaviour
Price <ul><li>Certain (Now) versus Uncertain… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Small Future Benefit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small ...
Conclusion <ul><li>Social Marketing v. Dangerous Consumption </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make no assumptions about the consumer ...
The Footnote Risk perception
Making risk work…
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Voluntary Choice And Dangerous Consumption

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Presentation on social marketing and how it could fit into the exploration of reducing dangerous consumption

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  • So what should we be evaluating if not Kirkpatricks levels? I’m interested in behavioural change. That’s my real objective. I looked at Rogers text on the Diffusion of innovation to see what influences behavioural change. There are three factors which impact on the likely hood of adoption of new thinking. 1. Receiver Variables – Personality of the learner, previous experiences, perceived need for change. 2. Social System Variables – What environment does the learner work in, is it open to change, what is the workplace culture like? 3. Perceived Characteristics of the Innovation - perceived complexity, triability, observability. And this is the area I think educational interventions have the most impact on . Has training reduced the complexity, given the learner an opportunity to try out and observe EBP ? So, If I want to see the full impact of training and understand the full picture, I need to evaluate all three areas that impact on adoption.
  • Voluntary Choice And Dangerous Consumption

    1. 1. Voluntary choice and dangerous consumption Social marketing as an ideological and infrastructural device for engagement with “misbehaving” consumers Dr Stephen Dann, Australian National University
    2. 2. Parameters
    3. 3. Social Marketing <ul><li>“ adaptation and adoption of commercial marketing activities, institutions and processes as a means to induce behavioral change in a targeted audience on a temporary or permanent basis to achieve a social goal” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dann, S “Redefining Social Marketing: Adapting and adopting contemporary commercial marketing thinking into the social marketing discipline”, Journal of Business Research , doi:10.1016/j.jbusres.2009.02.013 </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Social goal </li></ul><ul><li>the objective of the campaign to change or maintain society in accordance with the long term objectives of the campaign’s organizers </li></ul><ul><li>Behavior Change </li></ul><ul><li>process of altering, maintaining or encouraging the cessation of a specific activity undertaken by the targeted audience . </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive SM offer </li></ul><ul><li>alternative product offering that satisfies the same needs an individual in the targeted audience is currently meeting through the consumption or use of less socially desirable products. </li></ul>
    4. 4. Commercial Marketing <ul><li>&quot;Marketing is the management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably“ </li></ul><ul><li>A few keys tricks </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Price, Product, Distribution, Promotion </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Market research, consumer behaviour </li></ul></ul>
    5. 5. Advertising != marketing <ul><li>Advertising </li></ul><ul><li>direct marketing </li></ul><ul><li>sales promotion </li></ul><ul><li>publicity </li></ul><ul><li>public relations </li></ul><ul><li>personal selling </li></ul><ul><li>Sponsorship </li></ul>The visible one Last minute persuasion The embarrassing one.
    6. 6. Sponsorship it's a tax on companies who can't do math on ROI
    7. 7. The Diffusion of Innovation Ultimate aim is: Change in Behaviour Diffusion of innovation model, Rogers (1995)
    8. 8. Fitting into the social change agenda One technique, not the technique
    9. 9. Currently in use… <ul><li>National Prevention Agency </li></ul><ul><li>National Preventative Health </li></ul><ul><li>NHMRC (2000) guidelines for implementing medical evidence in practice </li></ul><ul><li>Types of causes </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gambling reduction, heart disease, crime reduction, countering radicalization, road safety, sun cancer, breast cancer, cancer self checks, increasing sport activity </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. Sometimes, it’s without recognition Sport Panel - Independent Sport Panel Report (Crawford Report) http://www.sportpanel.org.au/internet/sportpanel/publishing.nsf/Content/crawford-report
    11. 11. How do we* get people to change? <ul><li>Many models available which explain behaviour change from different perspectives </li></ul><ul><li>Different people react differently to the same information and situation </li></ul><ul><li>Understanding different perspectives on behavioural change and different elements of the behaviour change process can help divisions customise their programs for different groups </li></ul>*Marketers and Social marketers
    12. 12. Three macro alternatives Education Persuasion Compulsion (legislation)
    13. 15. What do we want? When do we want it? (How are we going to get it?)
    14. 16. Carrot or stick:which approach to use? <ul><li>Education : most valuable when a new threat emerges and when people lack information and knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>Legislation/compulsion : used to change environments in which target behaviours occur or as a last resort when all else has failed </li></ul><ul><li>Persuasion : useful when people know what to do, but are not convinced that the benefits of changing are greater than the benefits of staying the same </li></ul>
    15. 17. Reducing dangerous consumptions <ul><li>Prescriptive regulatory approaches result in people swapping one dangerous consumption behaviour with an alternative negative (product substitution) </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Contrary to the aim swapping a current behavior for a new positive alternative </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If we don’t offer a viable choice, the consumer will come up with their own option </li></ul>
    16. 18. Why we do it our way <ul><li>You can legislate, educate and pontificate, but in the end what works is when the kids see that they are being manipulated by the tobacco industry, that they are the ones who need to rebel against the deceptions, they need to become the solution and drive the campaign. Then we see ownership, social norms change and teen smoking rates decline . </li></ul><ul><li>On Social Marketing and Social Change: Social Marketing and STEM Education http://socialmarketing.blogs.com/r_craiig_lefebvres_social/2008/12/social-marketing-and-stem-education.html </li></ul>
    17. 19. The Consequences of Social Marketing <ul><li>Fundamental Principle of Exchange </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing Models </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing methods </li></ul>
    18. 20. Exchange <ul><li>Conditions of the Exchange </li></ul><ul><li>Freedom to leave the exchange </li></ul><ul><li>The Right of Rejection </li></ul>
    19. 21. Marketing Models <ul><li>Innovation Adoption </li></ul><ul><li>Stages of Change </li></ul>
    20. 22. Innovation Adoption Innovators. 5% 13% Early adopter Early majority 30% 35-40% 12% Late Majority Laggard
    21. 23. Stages of Change <ul><li>Pre-contemplation (awareness) </li></ul><ul><li>Contemplation (education and persuasion) </li></ul><ul><li>Preparation (facilitating products and services) </li></ul><ul><li>Action (service, support and behaviour) </li></ul><ul><li>Confirmation (reinforcement, re-engagement, rejection) </li></ul>
    22. 24. They know what to do, so why won’t they do it? <ul><li>They don’t actually know what to do </li></ul><ul><ul><li>we just think/assume they do </li></ul></ul><ul><li>They know what to do but not how to do it </li></ul><ul><li>They don’t believe the “evidence” </li></ul><ul><li>They don’t care – it’s someone else’s problem </li></ul><ul><li>They can’t – the barriers to change are too high </li></ul><ul><li>They don’t want to change. </li></ul>
    23. 25. They know what to do, so why won’t they do it? <ul><li>Certainty v risk </li></ul><ul><li>A sacrifice now doesn’t guarantee a healthier longer life </li></ul><ul><li>A chocolate bar or a beer now has a guaranteed performance standard and outcome </li></ul><ul><li>Everyone has a story about the person who did everything right and died young while the person who drank, smoke and ate chips lived to 100 </li></ul><ul><li>Statistics don’t matter when it’s your lifestyle at risk </li></ul>
    24. 26. Marketing methods Two overlooked methods
    25. 27. The Product Dangerous Consumption Idea Practice Object Belief Attitude Value Act Behaviour
    26. 28. Price <ul><li>Certain (Now) versus Uncertain… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Small Future Benefit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Small Future Detriment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Massive Future Benefit </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Devastating Future Detriment </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Financial Price </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunity Cost </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Social Price </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pride </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Effort </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social Status </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Community acceptance </li></ul></ul>
    27. 29. Conclusion <ul><li>Social Marketing v. Dangerous Consumption </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make no assumptions about the consumer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Ask. Understand. Appreciate. Respect. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Identify the barriers. Reduce them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Accept that perceived barriers are real </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Barriers differ between groups and individuals </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Accept rejection as a valid and considered response not simply an outcome of ignorance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Make a better offer. </li></ul></ul>
    28. 30. The Footnote Risk perception
    29. 31. Making risk work…
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