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So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
So You Want To Change
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So You Want To Change

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Marketing. It's more than bloody communications.

Marketing. It's more than bloody communications.

Published in: Business, Education
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  • 1.  
  • 2. Social Marketing Social Change with Marketing
  • 3. What do we mean? <ul><li>Social marketing is the systematic application of marketing concepts and techniques to achieve specific behavioural goals relevant to a social good </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(French and Blair-Stevens, 2005) </li></ul></ul>
  • 4. Marketing <ul><li>It’s not bloody communications </li></ul><ul><li>The management process responsible for identifying, anticipating and satisfying customer requirements profitably . </li></ul><ul><ul><li>CIM (2005) </li></ul></ul>
  • 5. Profitably <ul><li>Not strictly about the money </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(but doesn’t hurt not to create a yawning chasm of fiscal suck) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Mutual gain. </li></ul><ul><li>Better… </li></ul><ul><li>Faster… </li></ul><ul><li>More… </li></ul>
  • 6. Let’s talk real marketing
  • 7. Kotler, P and Roberto, E, (1989),
  • 8. The 5 Point Check <ul><li>Relative advantage </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(How does it kick ass?) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Compatibility </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Does it fit?) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Complexity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Good or bad complexity) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Capacity for Trial </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Heart surgery v. jogging) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Observable </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(Obvious or subtle?) </li></ul></ul>Rogers, 1995
  • 9. The expectations trap A Parasuraman, Zeithaml and Berry (1985) Expected Service Perceived Service GAP
  • 10. Why it’s a really big trap Perceived Service Expected Service Them Us Customer Gap GAP 1 GAP 2 GAP 3 External Communications to Customers GAP 4 Service Delivery Customer-Driven Service Designs and Standards Company Perceptions of Consumer Expectations
  • 11. Mind the Gap <ul><li>Customer Gap: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>difference between expectations and perceptions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provider Gap 1: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>not knowing what customers expect </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provider Gap 2: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>not having the right service designs and standards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provider Gap 3: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>not delivering to service standards </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Provider Gap 4: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>not matching performance to promises </li></ul></ul>
  • 12. &nbsp;

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