Mixing Alcopops and Politics:  Social Marketing and Social Change in Australia  Dr Stephen Dann School of Management Marke...
My History 1995 Honours Today 1997 Griffith Uni Social Mktg 1998 PhD 2004 AMA  def n 2004 QLD  Gov’t Monograph 2007 AMA  d...
Social Marketing Defined <ul><li>“the adaptation and adoption of commercial marketing activities, institutions and process...
Behavioural Change <ul><li>Behavioral change  is achieved through the creation, communication, delivery and exchange of a ...
A word from my sponsors ANU Outreach Grant
The ANU Connection <ul><li>College of Business and Economics Outreach Grants </li></ul><ul><li>Grants operation for the pu...
Outreach Grant Project <ul><li>20 Universities </li></ul><ul><li>30 academics </li></ul><ul><li>19 hours of interviews </l...
Bonus level <ul><li>August – October </li></ul><ul><li>Organising Committee, International Non Profit and Social Marketing...
Themes <ul><li>Who are Australia’s academic social marketers?  </li></ul><ul><li>Where does social marketing fit into the ...
Where are we? <ul><li>UQ </li></ul><ul><li>QUT </li></ul><ul><li>GRIFFITH </li></ul><ul><li>University of the Sunshine Coa...
Who are we? <ul><li>PhD students </li></ul><ul><li>Lecturers </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Lectures </li></ul><ul><li>Associate...
Where does social marketing fit?
Change Options Government Marketing Political Marketing Social Marketing
Change Options Government Marketing Political Marketing Social Marketing Evidence or  ideology? Change  or campaign? Compl...
Change Agents Society Politics Medicine Commerce Science Future
Why social marketing?
Social Marketing versus… <ul><li>Ultimately, the alcohol beverage industry and their SAPROs are commercial entities design...
Education doesn’t work… <ul><li>Rothschild (1999) Triangle </li></ul><ul><li>Law </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul...
NHRMC (2001) Guidelines <ul><li>Education outreach involves face-to-face visits by trained personnel to clinicians in thei...
Intra-or-Extra? <ul><li>Social marketing fits within </li></ul><ul><li>Health education </li></ul><ul><li>policy communica...
Where are the research opportunities in our community?
Fundamental social marketing theory Historical analysis ‘Landmark articles’ Developmental milestones, Social Marketing’s S...
Immediate Challenges Barriers, Road blocks  and unexpected outcomes
Politicised Social Marketing <ul><li>When the Government said they wanted less regulation interfering with people’s lives,...
What counts as “evidence” in evidence based intervention? <ul><li>Marketing inputs are not evidence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Should marketing metrics count as evidence? Does reach, frequency and recall have a role in benchmarking ‘socially negativ...
National Preventative Health Agenda Australia: The healthiest country by 2020
Preventative Health Report <ul><li>101 mentions of social marketing </li></ul><ul><li>2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage peo...
Where does the gov’t see our role? <ul><li>Ensuring effective implementation </li></ul><ul><li>induce   behavioral change ...
Three areas of interest <ul><li>Tobacco (Cessation) </li></ul><ul><li>Alcohol (Reduction) </li></ul><ul><li>Active living ...
What does the gov’t plan to measure? <ul><li>Enabling infrastructure measures / indicators relevant to: </li></ul><ul><ul>...
What the gov’t wants… <ul><li>Sufficient frequency, reach and intensity of mass media components over time, accompanied by...
Anyone else see a problem?
The Challenge <ul><li>Bringing the whole of the marketing tool kit to the government </li></ul><ul><li>Measurements that m...
Further reading
Journal List <ul><li>Hughes, A and Dann, S (2009)  Political Marketing and Stakeholder Engagement , Marketing Theory 9(2) ...
Conference  List <ul><li>Dann, S. (2008), Redefining Social Marketing: Adapting and adopting contemporary commercial marke...
<ul><li>This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Australia License. To view a copy of ...
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Mixing Alcopops and Politics: Social Marketing and Social Change in Australia

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Mixing Alcopops and Politics: Social Marketing and Social Change in Australia. Presented to the ANU MMIB School Staff Seminar on October 15, 2009 as part of the Social Marketing Benchmark Project

The project made possible by funding from the ANU College of Business and Economics

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Mixing Alcopops and Politics: Social Marketing and Social Change in Australia

  1. 1. Mixing Alcopops and Politics: Social Marketing and Social Change in Australia Dr Stephen Dann School of Management Marketing and International Business, Australian National University
  2. 2. My History 1995 Honours Today 1997 Griffith Uni Social Mktg 1998 PhD 2004 AMA def n 2004 QLD Gov’t Monograph 2007 AMA def n 2008 World Social Marketing Conference 2005 QUT 2006 ANU SMQ “Neutrality” SMQ “Adapt/ Adopt” 1998 Diana & Roadsafety SM & “Direct Benefit” JBR “Definition” Three part
  3. 3. Social Marketing Defined <ul><li>“the adaptation and adoption of commercial marketing activities, institutions and processes as a means to induce behavioral change in a targeted audience on a temporary or permanent basis to achieve a social goal ” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Dann, S “Redefining Social Marketing: Adapting and adopting contemporary commercial marketing thinking into the social marketing discipline”, Journal of Business Research, doi:10.1016/j.jbusres.2009.02.013 </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Behavioural Change <ul><li>Behavioral change is achieved through the creation, communication, delivery and exchange of a competitive social marketing offer that induces voluntary change in the targeted audience , and which results in benefit to the social change campaign’s recipients, partners and the broader society at large </li></ul>Definition
  5. 5. A word from my sponsors ANU Outreach Grant
  6. 6. The ANU Connection <ul><li>College of Business and Economics Outreach Grants </li></ul><ul><li>Grants operation for the purpose of raising the profile of the ANU </li></ul><ul><li>Positioning the ANU as a lead player in social marketing </li></ul><ul><li>Establish a reputation in our community of practice, and community of scholarship </li></ul>
  7. 7. Outreach Grant Project <ul><li>20 Universities </li></ul><ul><li>30 academics </li></ul><ul><li>19 hours of interviews </li></ul><ul><li>6 weeks </li></ul><ul><li>4 states </li></ul><ul><li>2 time zones </li></ul><ul><li>A very broad definition of “East Coast” </li></ul>
  8. 8. Bonus level <ul><li>August – October </li></ul><ul><li>Organising Committee, International Non Profit and Social Marketing Conference 2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Social Network Development Sub Committee, Global Social Marketing Assocation </li></ul><ul><li>Foundation Member, Australian Association of Social Marketers </li></ul>
  9. 9. Themes <ul><li>Who are Australia’s academic social marketers? </li></ul><ul><li>Where does social marketing fit into the landscape and toolkit of social change? </li></ul><ul><li>Where are the research opportunities in our community? </li></ul>
  10. 10. Where are we? <ul><li>UQ </li></ul><ul><li>QUT </li></ul><ul><li>GRIFFITH </li></ul><ul><li>University of the Sunshine Coast </li></ul><ul><li>Macquarie University </li></ul><ul><li>The University of Newcastle </li></ul><ul><li>The University of New England </li></ul><ul><li>The University of Sydney </li></ul><ul><li>University of Technology Sydney </li></ul><ul><li>University of Wollongong </li></ul><ul><li>La Trobe University </li></ul><ul><li>Monash University </li></ul><ul><li>RMIT </li></ul><ul><li>Swinburne University of Technology </li></ul><ul><li>The University of Melbourne </li></ul><ul><li>Victoria University </li></ul><ul><li>Curtin University of Technology </li></ul><ul><li>Edith Cowan University </li></ul><ul><li>The University of Western Australia </li></ul><ul><li>The Australian National University </li></ul>
  11. 11. Who are we? <ul><li>PhD students </li></ul><ul><li>Lecturers </li></ul><ul><li>Senior Lectures </li></ul><ul><li>Associate Professors </li></ul><ul><li>Professors </li></ul><ul><li>Deans </li></ul><ul><li>Heads of School </li></ul><ul><li>What brings us to SocMktg? </li></ul><ul><li>Personal drive </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing convert </li></ul><ul><li>Family </li></ul><ul><li>Intellectual Challenge </li></ul><ul><li>Legacy </li></ul><ul><li>Faith in marketing </li></ul><ul><li>Ambition </li></ul>
  12. 12. Where does social marketing fit?
  13. 13. Change Options Government Marketing Political Marketing Social Marketing
  14. 14. Change Options Government Marketing Political Marketing Social Marketing Evidence or ideology? Change or campaign? Compliance or choice?
  15. 15. Change Agents Society Politics Medicine Commerce Science Future
  16. 16. Why social marketing?
  17. 17. Social Marketing versus… <ul><li>Ultimately, the alcohol beverage industry and their SAPROs are commercial entities designed to maximise profit [11], a purpose which, in the case of marketing psychoactive substances, is incompatible with the public health. The industry would presumably argue that of course they are obliged to make a profit for shareholders and that their SAPRO-related activities show they wish to do this in a ‘socially responsible way’, for example, by helping create a climate in which moderate drinking becomes the norm.The position relies on the notion that moderate drinking enhances health, a claim which is increasingly difficult to sustain given new methodological research revealing systematic biases in the epidemiological studies which gave rise to this belief [12]. </li></ul><ul><li>[11] Anderson P. Consulting with the alcohol industry. Drug Alcohol Rev 2008;27:463–5. </li></ul><ul><li>[12] Fillmore KM, Stockwell T, Chikritzhs T, Bostrom A, Kerr W. Moderate alcohol use and reduced mortality risk: systematic error in prospective studies and new hypotheses. Ann Epidemiol 2007;17(5 Suppl):S16–23 </li></ul>Disclaimer: I am on the Social Marketing Advisory Committee.
  18. 18. Education doesn’t work… <ul><li>Rothschild (1999) Triangle </li></ul><ul><li>Law </li></ul><ul><li>Education </li></ul><ul><li>Social Marketing </li></ul>
  19. 19. NHRMC (2001) Guidelines <ul><li>Education outreach involves face-to-face visits by trained personnel to clinicians in their practice settings to provide information about an intervention...It appears to be particularly effective when combined with a social marketing approach that identifies barriers to change </li></ul><ul><li>How to put the evidence into practice: implementation and dissemination strategies, Handbook series on preparing clinical practice guidelines, Endorsed February 2000, National Health and Medical Research Council </li></ul>
  20. 20. Intra-or-Extra? <ul><li>Social marketing fits within </li></ul><ul><li>Health education </li></ul><ul><li>policy communication </li></ul><ul><li>tactical implementation </li></ul><ul><li>Incorporated/Integrated </li></ul><ul><li>Actions which are marketing are not necessarily labeled as “social marketing” </li></ul><ul><li>Social marketing informs </li></ul><ul><li>public health </li></ul><ul><li>lobbying </li></ul><ul><li>customer focused intervention </li></ul><ul><li>External and Identified </li></ul><ul><li>Actions labeled as “marketing” “advertising” “Social marketing” </li></ul>
  21. 21. Where are the research opportunities in our community?
  22. 22. Fundamental social marketing theory Historical analysis ‘Landmark articles’ Developmental milestones, Social Marketing’s SDL moment
  23. 23. Immediate Challenges Barriers, Road blocks and unexpected outcomes
  24. 24. Politicised Social Marketing <ul><li>When the Government said they wanted less regulation interfering with people’s lives, we never thought they meant social marketing campaigns for healthy eating would be withdrawn...We thought they just meant stuff about the banks. </li></ul><ul><li>New Zealand Social Marketing Academic </li></ul>
  25. 25. What counts as “evidence” in evidence based intervention? <ul><li>Marketing inputs are not evidence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Investments, plans, processes and intentions do not demonstrate behaviour change </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Marketing metrics are not evidence </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Recall, awareness, reach, frequency do not demonstrate behaviour change </li></ul></ul>
  26. 26. Should marketing metrics count as evidence? Does reach, frequency and recall have a role in benchmarking ‘socially negative’ advertising? But wait! There’s more…
  27. 27. National Preventative Health Agenda Australia: The healthiest country by 2020
  28. 28. Preventative Health Report <ul><li>101 mentions of social marketing </li></ul><ul><li>2010 </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage people to improve their levels of physical activity and healthy eating through comprehensive and effective social marketing </li></ul><ul><li>2013 </li></ul><ul><li>Implement new phases of comprehensive, sustained social marketing strategy to increase healthy eating and physical activity </li></ul>Future
  29. 29. Where does the gov’t see our role? <ul><li>Ensuring effective implementation </li></ul><ul><li>induce behavioral change in a targeted audience </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage people to improve their levels of physical activity and healthy eating through comprehensive and effective social marketing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Develop and work with Australian, state and territory governments to implement a comprehensive, sustained social marketing strategy to </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>increase healthy eating, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>physical activity and </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>reduce sedentary behaviour, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>building on Measure Up and state campaigns such as Go for 2&5, Find Thirty and Go for Your Life. </li></ul></ul>
  30. 30. Three areas of interest <ul><li>Tobacco (Cessation) </li></ul><ul><li>Alcohol (Reduction) </li></ul><ul><li>Active living </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Obesity down </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Exercise up (and down and up and down and up) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Healthy living </li></ul></ul>
  31. 31. What does the gov’t plan to measure? <ul><li>Enabling infrastructure measures / indicators relevant to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>workforce, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>investment in social marketing campaigns and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>investment in prevention research including </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>understanding of social determinants of health behaviour, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>modelling of health impact policy options and </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>evaluation of programs. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  32. 32. What the gov’t wants… <ul><li>Sufficient frequency, reach and intensity of mass media components over time, accompanied by adequate funding </li></ul><ul><li>Key action area 2: Increase the frequency, reach and intensity of social marketing campaigns </li></ul>
  33. 33. Anyone else see a problem?
  34. 34. The Challenge <ul><li>Bringing the whole of the marketing tool kit to the government </li></ul><ul><li>Measurements that match the specifications </li></ul><ul><li>Sustained change through applied marketing </li></ul>
  35. 35. Further reading
  36. 36. Journal List <ul><li>Hughes, A and Dann, S (2009) Political Marketing and Stakeholder Engagement , Marketing Theory 9(2) 243-256 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S “ Redefining Social Marketing: Adapting and adopting contemporary commercial marketing thinking into the social marketing discipline ”, Journal of Business Research (2009, in print) doi:10.1016/j.jbusres.2009.02.013 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S. (2008) Adaptation and Adoption of the American Marketing Association (2007) Definition for Social Marketing , Social Marketing Quarterly, 14(2) 1-9, DOI: 10.1080/15245000802034739 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S (2007) “ Reaffirming the Neutrality of the Social Marketing Tool Kit: Social Marketing as a Hammer, and Social Marketers as Hired Guns ” Social Marketing Quarterly 13(1) 54-62, DOI: 10.1080/15245000601158390 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S (2007) &quot;Lifestyle sponsorships and player lifestyle breaches: Opportunity, not loss&quot; Monash Business Review, Volume 3, No. 2, July 2007 [Full Paper online at http://www.buseco.monash.edu.au/gsb/mbr/full-papers.php ], DOI: 10.2104/mbr07023 </li></ul><ul><li>Graham P, and Dann S 1997 &quot;Banning Tobacco Advertising: The Australian Example&quot; Journal of Contemporary Issues in Business and Government 3(2): 11–17 </li></ul>
  37. 37. Conference List <ul><li>Dann, S. (2008), Redefining Social Marketing: Adapting and adopting contemporary commercial marketing thinking into the social marketing discipline, World Social Marketing Conference, Brighton and Hove City, England, 29-30 September 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S. (2008) A Leximancer analysis of social marketing definitions versus social marketing literature, Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, Sydney, 1-3 December 2008 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S, (2008) Lifestyle Sponsorships: Social Change through sports sponsorship, Sixth Sports Marketing Association Conference, University of Southern Queensland, 16-19 July, Gold Coast </li></ul><ul><li>Fry, M L and Dann S (2007) &quot;(Near) Enough is (Good) Enough: When to rethink the zero tolerance level in road safety campaigning?&quot; International Nonprofit and Social Marketing Conference 27 – 28 September Brisbane </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S. and Fry, M. L. (2006) “When is good enough, near enough? Examinations of “success” in social marketing intervention in road safety” , Australian and New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, QUT, Dec 4-6. </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S. (2006) “Social Marketing in the Age of Direct Benefit and Upstream Marketing” Third Australasian Non-profit and Social Marketing Conference, 10-11 August, 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S. (2006) “Reaffirming the Neutrality of the Social Marketing Tool Kit: Social marketing as a hammer, and social marketers as hired guns” Third Australasian Non-profit and Social Marketing Conference, 10-11 August, 2006 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S (2005) &quot; Social change marketing in the age of direct benefit marketing – where to from here?&quot; Social Change in the 21st Century, QUT Carseldine 28 October 2005. </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S & Dann, S (2005) &quot;Lifestyle Sponsorship and Player Lifestyle Breach: Opportunity, Not Loss?&quot; Second Australasian Nonprofit and Social Marketing Conference, Melbourne, 25 September 2005. </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S & Dann, S (2002) “High–Speed Car Advertising and Road Safety” Australia New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, December 2 - December 4 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S & Dann, S (1998) &quot;Celebrity Endorsement in Social Campaigns: Attitudes Towards the Use of Diana, Princess of Wales in Road Safety Campaigns&quot;, Australia New Zealand Marketing Academy Conference, November 29 - December 2, 1998 </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S & Dann, S (1998) &quot;Marketing in the New Media in the Not for Profit Sector&quot;, British Academy of Management Conference, Nottingham, 13-16 September </li></ul><ul><li>Dann, S, Previte, J. & Dann, S (1996) &quot;Social marketing in cyberspace: One step forward or two steps back?&quot;, Marketing Educators Group Conference, Academy of Marketing, 1996, Glascow University of Strathclyde (with Susan Dann and Josephine Previte) </li></ul>
  38. 38. <ul><li>This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 2.5 Australia License. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5/au/ </li></ul>
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