Lifestyle Sponsorship and Player Lifestyle Breach: Opportunity, Not Loss? Dr Stephen Dann (QUT) Dr Susan Dann (National Se...
Frameworks <ul><li>Sponsorship </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the provision of assistance either financial or in-kind to an activit...
Gwinner (1997) framework <ul><li>Sponsorship relevance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>direct relevance  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul>...
Lifestyle Sponsorship <ul><li>Lifestyle sponsorships  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“the provision of financial assistance, or in-...
Features of Lifestyle sponsorships <ul><li>Lifestyle sponsorships  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>are targeted where a problem exis...
Problems with Lifestyle Sponsorships <ul><li>Lifestyle sponsorships  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sponsorship arrangement may car...
The TAC Case Study: Lifestyle in Breach <ul><li>Core of the lifestyle sponsorship proposal is the assumption that society,...
TAC Case
TAC Sponsorship <ul><li>assumption that drink driving was a social problem, and that this problem could be addressed throu...
Social Issue at stake <ul><li>Where a campaign is targeted at addressing a social problem (drink driving), the continuatio...
Schema Congruity <ul><li>Sponsorship and celebrity endorsement are both heavily dependent on schema congruence for success...
Three Assumptions <ul><li>the purpose of the lifestyle sponsorship was to address a social change need whereby a social pr...
Four steps to resolution <ul><li>Step 1: Assessing the impact of the breach </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2: Reaffirm the purpose...
Step 1 <ul><li>Damage control for the lifestyle sponsor is based on the breadth of coverage, and the confusion between the...
Step 2 <ul><li>Capitalise on the sponsor image and attitudes towards the sponsors by taking control of the message incurre...
Step 3 <ul><li>Create schema mismatch </li></ul><ul><ul><li>breach negatively influences the image similarity </li></ul></...
Step 4 <ul><li>Sponsee in breach endorses the new lifestyle message </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the sponsee in breach who contin...
Conclusions <ul><li>By utilising both the functional and image similarity aspects of Gwinner's (1997) model for determinin...
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Lifestyle Sponsorship 2005

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The first presentation of the lifestyle sponsorship breach as market opportunity concept. The audience was not impressed that we wanted to treat football players as humans.

Reference: Dann, S & Dann, S (2005) "Lifestyle Sponsorship and Player Lifestyle Breach: Opportunity, Not Loss?" Second Australasian Nonprofit and Social Marketing Conference, Melbourne, 25 September 2005.

Available at http://stephendann.net/articles/thematic/sportsmarketing.htm

Published in: Economy & Finance, Education
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Lifestyle Sponsorship 2005

  1. 1. Lifestyle Sponsorship and Player Lifestyle Breach: Opportunity, Not Loss? Dr Stephen Dann (QUT) Dr Susan Dann (National Seniors)
  2. 2. Frameworks <ul><li>Sponsorship </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the provision of assistance either financial or in-kind to an activity by a commercial organisation for the purpose of achieving commercial objectives (Meenaghan, 1983). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>The act of sponsorship is seen as two parts: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>(1) an exchange between a sponsor and a sponsee whereby the latter receives a fee and the former receives rights to associate itself with the activity sponsored, and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(2) the marketing of the association by the sponsor </li></ul></ul>
  3. 3. Gwinner (1997) framework <ul><li>Sponsorship relevance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>direct relevance </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>functional based similarity </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>occurs where the sponsors products are used in the event </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Indirect relevance – </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“image-based similarity” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>match between the core values of the consumer and the values represented by the sponsors and sponsorship event </li></ul></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Lifestyle Sponsorship <ul><li>Lifestyle sponsorships </li></ul><ul><ul><li>“the provision of financial assistance, or in-kind assistance to an activity by an organisation for the purpose of promoting lifestyle or behavioural change objectives” </li></ul></ul><ul><li>core identifier of a lifestyle sponsorship is the product being promoted by the sponsorship </li></ul><ul><ul><li>is not a commercial product or service </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>is a behaviour, lifestyle change or attitude change </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Features of Lifestyle sponsorships <ul><li>Lifestyle sponsorships </li></ul><ul><ul><li>are targeted where a problem exists to be solved, rather than where a demand exists to be fulfilled or expanded. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What constitutes &quot;functional similarity&quot; for lifestyle sponsorship under Gwinner's (1997) model of sponsorship relevance? </li></ul></ul>
  6. 6. Problems with Lifestyle Sponsorships <ul><li>Lifestyle sponsorships </li></ul><ul><ul><li>sponsorship arrangement may carry the expectation that the lifestyle message be adopted and enforced in private activities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>restricted by the nature of the sponsor product </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>can only offer education sessions for players, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>cannot provide compliance for the team. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Related problems arise for other physical goods based lifestyle sponsorships </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>sponsees are required to behave in a restricted manner, they are not guaranteed an outcome from this behaviour. </li></ul>
  7. 7. The TAC Case Study: Lifestyle in Breach <ul><li>Core of the lifestyle sponsorship proposal is the assumption that society, as it stands, has a current problem which requires addressing. </li></ul><ul><li>Consequently, sponsorship would continue until the social goals of the campaign have been met </li></ul>
  8. 8. TAC Case
  9. 9. TAC Sponsorship <ul><li>assumption that drink driving was a social problem, and that this problem could be addressed through raising awareness and profile with the associated sponsorship. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Richmond player committed the lifestyle breach it was demonstrable proof that the campaign was still necessary. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>16 years of sponsorship, </li></ul><ul><ul><li>two incidents of road safety lifestyle breaches (2001, 2005) involving drink driving. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. Social Issue at stake <ul><li>Where a campaign is targeted at addressing a social problem (drink driving), the continuation of the campaign is based on demonstrating the continued existence of the problem. </li></ul><ul><li>The high profile breach of the lifestyle message by the Richmond player was demonstrable proof of the need to continue promoting the TAC lifestyle message. </li></ul>
  11. 11. Schema Congruity <ul><li>Sponsorship and celebrity endorsement are both heavily dependent on schema congruence for success in message transfer </li></ul><ul><li>where there is a moderate incongruity, or a partial match, this increases the amount of thought the individual puts into assessing the sponsorship message </li></ul><ul><li>the mismatch increases the recall of the sponsor message due to the stronger, more elaborate schema that is created by the additional interpretation </li></ul>
  12. 12. Three Assumptions <ul><li>the purpose of the lifestyle sponsorship was to address a social change need whereby a social problem was to be solved, limited or have attitudes toward it changed. </li></ul><ul><li>that the sponsorship arrangement is predicated on sponsees following mandated sponsor approved lifestyle choices. </li></ul><ul><li>a breach of the lifestyle sponsor mandated behaviour can be rectified by some component of the sponsor's social change product </li></ul>
  13. 13. Four steps to resolution <ul><li>Step 1: Assessing the impact of the breach </li></ul><ul><li>Step 2: Reaffirm the purpose of the Lifestyle Sponsorship Message </li></ul><ul><li>Step 3: Use schema mismatch as a basis for continuing the sponsorship in breach </li></ul><ul><li>Step 4: Endorse the lifestyle message with the sponsee who was in breach. </li></ul>
  14. 14. Step 1 <ul><li>Damage control for the lifestyle sponsor is based on the breadth of coverage, and the confusion between the sponsor message and the message sent by the action. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>media coverage emphasised the incongruity between the TAC sponsorship message and the actions of a sponsee employee </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Breach resulted in </li></ul><ul><ul><li>awareness of the sponsorship was increased, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>possible levels of recall were improved, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>uncertainty exists as to the impact on attitude towards the sponsor and the sponsor's image. </li></ul></ul>
  15. 15. Step 2 <ul><li>Capitalise on the sponsor image and attitudes towards the sponsors by taking control of the message incurred by the breach. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Reaffirming the commitment to the sponsorship and the campaign </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Justify with proactive statements illustrating the need for the continuation of the campaign as a direct result of the breach </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Note: The breach did not demonstrate an opportunity for TAC to withdraw from the propagation of the message </li></ul>
  16. 16. Step 3 <ul><li>Create schema mismatch </li></ul><ul><ul><li>breach negatively influences the image similarity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>creates opportunity to capitalise on functional based similarity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>demonstrating the newly adopted use of the sponsor endorsed lifestyle by the sponsee in breach </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Initial reaction to a lifestyle breach is to withdraw the sponsorship due to tainting of image based similarity </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Step 4 <ul><li>Sponsee in breach endorses the new lifestyle message </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the sponsee in breach who continues to endorse </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>a non-breach lifestyle </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>breach-recovery lifestyle, </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>improves their schema match with the campaign message </li></ul></ul><ul><li>By endorsing a modified version of the campaign, the sponsee in breach demonstrates </li></ul><ul><ul><li>credibility (having engaged in the negative behaviour), </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>expertise (has experienced the breach), </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>trustworthiness (voluntary admission of breach and involvement) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>empathy (has felt the emotional consequences of the breach) </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Conclusions <ul><li>By utilising both the functional and image similarity aspects of Gwinner's (1997) model for determining the relevance of the lifestyle sponsorship, the sponsor becomes less vulnerable to damage from breach. </li></ul><ul><li>However, if the sponsor only uses the image similarity relevance component, a lifestyle breach will cause irreparable damage to their message and campaign </li></ul><ul><li>Breach, and breach recovery, creates an opportunity, not a threat, for the proactive lifestyle sponsor willing to stick to their core business – addressing a social need. </li></ul>
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