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Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing
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Insight And Overview Of Social Marketing

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Coauthored slideshow presentation introducing the basic concepts of social marketing.

Coauthored slideshow presentation introducing the basic concepts of social marketing.

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  1. Insight and Overview of Social Marketing Dr Susan Dann Dr Stephen Dann
  2. Overview <ul><li>Social marketing review </li></ul><ul><li>Evolving definitions </li></ul><ul><li>Social marketing and social change </li></ul><ul><li>Current issues, controversies and trends in social marketing </li></ul><ul><li>Practical perspectives for social marketing in government </li></ul>
  3. Social marketing <ul><li>After around a decade of stability, multiple “new” definitions have emerged </li></ul><ul><li>Andreasen 1995 definition is the standard – and the point from which others make their point of departure </li></ul><ul><li>Established the focus on behaviour change as social marketing’s “bottom line” </li></ul>
  4. Andreasen definition <ul><li>“ Social marketing is the application of commercial marketing technologies to the analysis, planning, execution and evaluation of programs designed to influence the voluntary behaviour of target audiences in order to improve their personal welfare and that of their society.” </li></ul>
  5. Two key “new” views <ul><li>Institute Social Marketing Stirling University (Hastings et al) – reverted to Lazer & Kelly 1973 definition </li></ul><ul><li>&quot;Social marketing is concerned with the application of marketing knowledge, concepts, and techniques to enhance social as well as economic ends. It is also concerned with the analysis of the social consequences of marketing policies, decisions and activities .&quot; </li></ul><ul><li>Donovan (WA) – moves away from voluntary to involuntary change (ie takes away the “right to be banal”) </li></ul>
  6. The right to be banal <ul><li>“ Freedom is not worth having if it does not connote freedom to err. It passes my comprehension how human beings, be they ever so experienced and able, can delight in depriving other human beings of that precious right.” </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gandhi </li></ul></ul>
  7. Points of differentiation for social marketing <ul><li>Social marketing is a sub discipline of “marketing” therefore it needs to draw its principles and practices from the parent discipline </li></ul><ul><li>Involves the adoption of the philosophy of the marketing concept with the adaptation of the tools of marketing </li></ul><ul><li>Key principles include the focus on consumer / client needs and voluntary participation </li></ul>
  8. Social v commercial marketing <ul><li>Commercial marketing “if I have one apple and you have one apple and we exchange them, then I have on apple and you have one apple.” </li></ul><ul><li>Social marketing “if I have an idea and you have an idea and we exchange our ideas, we both have two ideas” </li></ul><ul><li>Social marketing results in cumulative knowledge, attitudes, opinions and behaviours </li></ul>
  9. Socially oriented marketing activities Profit Marketing Pro social Marketing Social Marketing Corporate Philanthropy Cause Related Marketing Non-profit Marketing
  10. Current dilemma <ul><li>New official AMA definition of marketing </li></ul><ul><li>If social marketing is a derivative of the core discipline of marketing – and marketing itself undergoes a significant change – where does this leave social marketing? </li></ul>
  11. Marketing 1985 v Marketing 2004 <ul><li>1985 </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing is the process of planning and executing the conception, pricing, promotion and distribution of ideas, goods and services to create exchanges that satisfy individual and organisational goals </li></ul><ul><li>2004 </li></ul><ul><li>Marketing is an organisational function and set of processes for creating, communicating and delivering value to customers and for managing customer relationships in ways that benefit the organisation and its stakeholders </li></ul>
  12. Issues for social marketing <ul><li>What constitutes “value” for the social marketing consumer? </li></ul><ul><li>Do social marketers want a “relationship” with their client? </li></ul><ul><li>Can government afford to fund this style of social marketing? </li></ul><ul><li>Who are the stakeholders / who are the consumers? </li></ul>
  13. Upstream v downstream social marketing <ul><li>Recent increase in emphasis on the notion of where social marketing activities should be focussed </li></ul><ul><li>Traditionally social marketing as a voluntary change mechanism has targeted individuals and conceptualised social change as being the sum of individual changes </li></ul><ul><li>Recently the debate has been on refocussing the targets of social marketing and aiming for legislative and structural change to force behaviour change </li></ul>
  14. Different methods for different situations <ul><li>Social marketing is not always the ideal or appropriate approach to behavioural change </li></ul><ul><li>Education / information dissemination and legislative reform are valid alternatives, but should not be confused with social marketing per se </li></ul>
  15. Continuum of change mechanisms Unmanageable Active but manageable Minimal or non existent Competition for the message Hard to convey or do not match the markets self interest Can be enhanced by managing the offer to match self interest Are easily conveyed and match the self interest of the market Benefits Is actively resistant Is neither prone nor resistant Is prone to appropriate behaviour Target market Legislation Social Marketing Education
  16. Competition and demand <ul><li>Without understanding the nature of competition and demand in social marketing, designing an effective campaign is difficult </li></ul><ul><li>Potential adopters and current habits are the biggest source of competition to social marketing campaigns </li></ul><ul><li>Competition in social marketing is an alternative, non endorsed behaviour ie </li></ul>
  17. Alternative social behaviours Excess alcohol consumption Meditation / exercise Stress Smoking / amphetamines Increased exercise / improved diet Obesity Drugged driving Sober driving Drink driving Negative alternative Positive (endorsed) alternative Target behaviour/ issue
  18. Recognising the ingenuity of the public <ul><li>The ability of individuals to rationalise behaviour and be inventive about alternatives to targeted behaviour reinforces the need for social marketers to offer specified alternatives (ie do this rather than just don’t do that) and methods by which these can be accomplished. </li></ul>
  19. Demand and risk <ul><li>Demand for social marketing products tends to either non existent or negative </li></ul><ul><li>Outcomes are not guaranteed and difficult to measure or prove </li></ul><ul><li>Adopting social marketing products often results in high levels of social risk </li></ul>
  20. Practical perspectives for government <ul><li>Academically the 4Ps and their variations are currently unfashionable due to their managerial emphasis and lack of strategic influence however at a tactical level they are still very effective as a checklist </li></ul><ul><li>Recommendation: do not abandon the marketing mix but use with discretion </li></ul>
  21. Practical perspectives <ul><li>Be aware of the increasing emphasis on up stream social marketing and conscious of its potential as a new element in lobbying </li></ul><ul><li>Increased emphasis on social consequences of marketing – political as well as social implications </li></ul>
  22. Practical perspectives <ul><li>Be aware of the limitations of social marketing and the types of change it is best used for – it is not universally relevant </li></ul>
  23. Conclusion <ul><li>Social marketing is currently enjoying an upsurge in popularity world wide however </li></ul><ul><li>It is not the solution to all problems </li></ul><ul><li>Government responsibilities mean that the use of social marketing needs to be balanced with the potential social and political consequences </li></ul>

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