Dr Stephen Dann Senior Lecturer Marketing Management and International Business The Australian National University
Commercial Marketing and  Social Marketing <ul><li>Commercial Marketing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>an organizational function a...
What makes it Marketing? <ul><li>Creation, communication and delivery. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Marketing is more than commun...
What makes it social marketing? <ul><li>Marketing. </li></ul><ul><li>If there is no marketing, there is no social marketin...
Adding commercial marketing thinking to Social Marketing
Three Themes <ul><li>Integration of relationship marketing and internet marketing </li></ul><ul><li>Interpreting consumer ...
Relationship Marketing
Starting with the relationships <ul><li>What is relationship marketing? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>establish, maintain, and enh...
Keys to Relationship Marketing <ul><li>Trust  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>willingness to rely on a partner in an exchange </li><...
How’s that help social marketing? <ul><li>Trust, reciprocity and commitment underpin long term engagement between business...
Social Marketing Relationship Marketing <ul><li>Relationship reciprocity involves the non-monetary aspects of the marketin...
Using Commercial Marketing for  Social Marketing Internet Marketing
Internet Marketing <ul><li>Four rules </li></ul><ul><li>Accept there is competition </li></ul><ul><li>Set the campaign fre...
Using Commercial Marketing for  Social Marketing Interpreting consumer research to create new opportunities (and challenges)
Step 1 <ul><li>Talk to the intended audience. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seriously, just talk.  </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ask the ...
Step 2. Get ready to make a deal <ul><li>Offer a solution to the problem (if they’ve said there’s a problem)  </li></ul><u...
Step 2.5 <ul><li>Do not offer “health”.  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nobody actually cares about their health.  </li></ul></ul><...
Step 3 <ul><li>Go back to the people from Step 1 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk to them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make them t...
Step 4: Don’t cheat <ul><li>Don’t cheat. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Switching to legislative enforcement when our social change...
Learning from Commercial Practice <ul><li>If you’re going to use social marketing, then you make an offer, and if the mark...
Using Commercial Marketing for  Social Marketing Targeting consumers’ progress towards adopting a desired behaviour
How new is the behavior?
Adopter Categories <ul><li>Innovators  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>venturesome </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Believes in the cause ...
Laggards <ul><li>Traditional  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>set in the ways </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resistant  </li></ul><ul><ul><l...
Why do we persist in Laggard first? <ul><li>Laggards are seen as  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the highest risk,  </li></ul></ul>...
Summary
90 second summary <ul><li>Talk to the end user </li></ul><ul><li>The internet is great at what it does, but not everybody ...
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Adding commercial marketing thinking to Social Marketing

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Original draft of the presentation to the IQPC Government Marketing conference.

Published in: Business, News & Politics

Adding commercial marketing thinking to Social Marketing

  1. 1. Dr Stephen Dann Senior Lecturer Marketing Management and International Business The Australian National University
  2. 2. Commercial Marketing and Social Marketing <ul><li>Commercial Marketing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>an organizational function and a set of processes for creating, communicating and delivering value to customers and for managing customer relationships in ways that benefit the organization and its stakeholders” (AMA 2004) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Social marketing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>a process that applies marketing principles and techniques to create, communicate, and deliver value in order to influence target audience behaviors that benefit society (public health, safety, the environment and communities) as well as the target audience.&quot; </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Philip Kotler, Nancy Lee and Michael Rothschild (2006) in Social Marketing: Influencing Behaviors for Good (SAGE Publications) 2007. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. What makes it Marketing? <ul><li>Creation, communication and delivery. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Marketing is more than communication </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Value for Benefit </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Serving the self interest of the individual in the name of the self interest of the organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Exchange </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The process is designed to be implemented so that everybody involved gains during the exchange </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. What makes it social marketing? <ul><li>Marketing. </li></ul><ul><li>If there is no marketing, there is no social marketing </li></ul><ul><li>…Marketing is not something we can just make up as we go along because someone put ‘‘social’’ in front of it. We all need to read a marketing textbook… </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Smith, 2006, Social Marketing Quarterly </li></ul></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Adding commercial marketing thinking to Social Marketing
  6. 6. Three Themes <ul><li>Integration of relationship marketing and internet marketing </li></ul><ul><li>Interpreting consumer research to create new opportunities (and challenges) </li></ul><ul><li>Targeting consumers’ progress towards adopting a desired behaviour </li></ul>
  7. 7. Relationship Marketing
  8. 8. Starting with the relationships <ul><li>What is relationship marketing? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>establish, maintain, and enhance relationships with customers and other partners, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>at a profit, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>so that the objectives of the parties involved are met. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>This is achieved by a mutual exchange and fulfillment of promises. </li></ul></ul>
  9. 9. Keys to Relationship Marketing <ul><li>Trust </li></ul><ul><ul><li>willingness to rely on a partner in an exchange </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>level of confidence in the other partner, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>belief in the trustworthiness </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>reliance on the other partner to perform </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Commitment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>perceived need to continue the relationship, either due to the inherent value of staying or the cost of departure </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Reciprocity </li></ul><ul><ul><li>notions of equality in the transaction, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>value-for-value exchange </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>mutual obligation between partners in the relationship. </li></ul></ul>
  10. 10. How’s that help social marketing? <ul><li>Trust, reciprocity and commitment underpin long term engagement between business and consumer </li></ul><ul><li>Government Marketing and Relationship Marketing </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Relationship with the customer is for the long term </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Need to deliver to the audience </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Meet goals </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Build trust </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Keep promises </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Long term value of a trusted exchange between two parties </li></ul>
  11. 11. Social Marketing Relationship Marketing <ul><li>Relationship reciprocity involves the non-monetary aspects of the marketing relationship and includes: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>increased stability between relationship partners </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>reduced risk in supplier selection </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Who to trust for social change information </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>increased efficiencies over the course of the relationship </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Less resources spent on proofing trustworthiness </li></ul></ul></ul>
  12. 12. Using Commercial Marketing for Social Marketing Internet Marketing
  13. 13. Internet Marketing <ul><li>Four rules </li></ul><ul><li>Accept there is competition </li></ul><ul><li>Set the campaign free </li></ul><ul><li>Make it easy to share </li></ul><ul><li>Work with the natural environment </li></ul>
  14. 14. Using Commercial Marketing for Social Marketing Interpreting consumer research to create new opportunities (and challenges)
  15. 15. Step 1 <ul><li>Talk to the intended audience. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Seriously, just talk. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Ask the target audience about what they do </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Get them to describe it to you </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What do they like about the current behavior? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If they’re wanting to change, talk about the barriers they feel get in their way </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What’s good about it? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Why do they do it? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Let them ask what can they do to assist and support? </li></ul>
  16. 16. Step 2. Get ready to make a deal <ul><li>Offer a solution to the problem (if they’ve said there’s a problem) </li></ul><ul><li>Offer a better deal (if they’re enjoying what they’re doing) </li></ul><ul><li>Offer something to think about (if they’re unaware) </li></ul><ul><li>When you make the offer </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Be specific </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be direct </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be obvious </li></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Step 2.5 <ul><li>Do not offer “health”. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Nobody actually cares about their health. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They care about what health lets them do. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>“improved health” is not “keeping up with the kids” </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>Nobody buys a box of health. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Appeal to vanity </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Appeal to the self interest </li></ul></ul>
  18. 18. Step 3 <ul><li>Go back to the people from Step 1 </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Talk to them </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make them the offer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>See how they react to the offer </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Be ready to change the offer, scrap the offer or upgrade and supersize their social change </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build a relationship based on being honest, trustworthy and holding up your end of the deal </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t cheat </li></ul></ul>
  19. 19. Step 4: Don’t cheat <ul><li>Don’t cheat. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Switching to legislative enforcement when our social change campaigns fail to take a grip is cheating. It's saying that if you won't play nicely, we'll force you to play. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cheating defeats trust. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You will do because we enforce, not because we trust </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cheating says there’s no reciprocity. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>You will do, or else. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cheating kills the commitment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Do it because we said so, not because you’re actually committed to holding up your end of the deal </li></ul></ul>
  20. 20. Learning from Commercial Practice <ul><li>If you’re going to use social marketing, then you make an offer, and if the market rejects the offer, you go back and try again. </li></ul><ul><li>Keep making different offers until you quit or you beat the current market. </li></ul><ul><li>Ask Apple about how many different offers it took to be the guys who made the iPod. </li></ul>
  21. 21. Using Commercial Marketing for Social Marketing Targeting consumers’ progress towards adopting a desired behaviour
  22. 22. How new is the behavior?
  23. 23. Adopter Categories <ul><li>Innovators </li></ul><ul><ul><li>venturesome </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Believes in the cause / identifies the solution </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Early Adopters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>respect </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Strong advocate for the cause </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Early Majority </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Deliberate </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informed choice and calculated behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Late Majority </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Skeptical </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Will try it once, but need to be shown the results </li></ul></ul>
  24. 24. Laggards <ul><li>Traditional </li></ul><ul><ul><li>set in the ways </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resistant </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Don’t want the offer </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Chronic Know-Nothings </li></ul><ul><ul><li>There’s an offer? </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Grudging Acceptor </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Doesn’t have a choice </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Conscious Choice Rejecters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Well informed, well educated, aware of the benefits and costs of the activity, and have declined your offer anyway. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Cautious Super Adopters </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Waits for the market to calm down, then picks up the most recent, newest and most stable version </li></ul></ul>
  25. 25. Why do we persist in Laggard first? <ul><li>Laggards are seen as </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the highest risk, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>most at need, </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>greatest problem to be solved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>most likely to die if we cut them off </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>most resistant </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>really good news stories </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>probably the reason for the campaign being approved by the minister in the first place </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>marginalised group / special interest group </li></ul></ul>
  26. 26. Summary
  27. 27. 90 second summary <ul><li>Talk to the end user </li></ul><ul><li>The internet is great at what it does, but not everybody uses the internet. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Go where the target market is </li></ul></ul><ul><li>If it’s new to you, check it’s new to them before declaring it innovative. </li></ul><ul><li>The iPod Social Change approach means overnight success after decades of missing the mark. </li></ul>

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