Gamification strategies

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Organisations continue to search for the silver bullet that will deliver improved employee and customer engagement, facilitate more effective collaboration and drive innovation. Is "gamification" the …

Organisations continue to search for the silver bullet that will deliver improved employee and customer engagement, facilitate more effective collaboration and drive innovation. Is "gamification" the answer, or is it just one more over-hyped and fashionable trend that promises much but delivers little? Gamification has indeed bubbled to the top of the Gartner hype cycle, but there is growing evidence that it is an effective business improvement change agent, with industry growth rates predicted to be 67% p.a. and a market worth £3.4 billion by 2018.
  
Gamification is about much more than simply rewarding points and badges, but rather understanding and influencing the human behaviours companies want to encourage among their employees and customers. Gamification is founded in the fundamentals of human psychology and behavioural science, and rests on three primary factors: motivation, ability level and triggers.
 
This session looks at some of the gamification strategies and techniques being used to influence behaviour change, and how these techniques can be used to facilitate more effective collaboration and employee/customer engagement.

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  • The topic attracted a lot of attention - there were about 10 people who had never been to a NetIKX event before. I'm writing a shortish white paper on the topic, which I'll share with you. Key takeaway is that gamification can work for self-contained projects and activities, i.e. those with a start and end date. I don't see it as something that can have long-term influence on behaviours, and it won't change culture!
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  • Nice presentation Stephen, thanks for sharing. Be interested in a chat about the 'takeaways' from the event and whether it resonated as a topic!
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  • Organisations continue to search for the silver bullet that will deliver improved employee and customer engagement, facilitate more effective collaboration and drive innovation. Is "gamification" the answer, or is it just one more over-hyped and fashionable trend that promises much but delivers little? Gamification has indeed bubbled to the top of the Gartner hype cycle, but there is growing evidence that it is an effective business improvement change agent, with industry growth rates predicted to be 67% p.a. and a market worth £3.4 billion by 2018.
      
    Gamification is about much more than simply rewarding points and badges, but rather understanding and influencing the human behaviours companies want to encourage among their employees and customers. Gamification is founded in the fundamentals of human psychology and behavioural science, and rests on three primary factors: motivation, ability level and triggers.
     
     This session will look at some of the gamification strategies and techniques being used to influence behaviour change, and how these techniques can be used to facilitate more effective collaboration and employee/customer engagement.
  • According to Wikipedia: Gamification is the use of game thinking and game mechanics in non-game contexts to engage users in solving problems. But waht do we mean by “game mechanics”? Jesse Schell, CEO of videogame studio, Schell Games and the former chair of the International Game Developers Association defines it thus: a game is a problem-solving activity approached with a playful attitude.
    But before we get bogged down with definitions, let’s think about purpose and objectives of “gamification”. The key purpose is to engage and encourage participation; it’s about understanding (and utilising) the triggers that affect behaviours, or in other words, the application of psychology to influence outcomes.
    Whether we realise it or not, we encounter the principles of gamification in just about every aspect of our lives, for example, loyalty cards for petrol or groceries, bonus payments, energy saving schemes, squash/bridge/tennis rankings. It’s not just about gaining points or trophies, it can also be the avoidance of penalties - e.g. the surcharge applied by some supermarkets on the use of plastic carrier that might encourage us to be more aware of damage to the environment.
  • It's still seen as 5-10 years out from its plateau, but also dangerously close to the Trough of Disillusionment. Perhaps this is why there is more and more marketing effort to move away from the term "gamification" in the enterprise space, and instead focus on terms like employee engagement and motivation.  More companies are trying to focus less on the splash of gamification and more on the idea of what successful gamification achieve.  Executives and managers might argue that gamification sounds like they are trivialising enterprise software, but who is going to argue against more engaged and motivated employees?
  • Whatever else we believe, gamification is big business!
  • The company of the future – and indeed the company of the present – needs new instruments to adapt to a changing reality. The new generation of digital natives is progressively being incorporated to the world of work. We are talking about a generation that has lived most of its life within the technological revolution that has occurred in the last two decades. It has connected people, who spend more time on the Internet than in front of the television and who have lived with the emergence of video games. It is not to judge whether that is good or bad, it’s simply real and nothing will change it.
  • Gamification is the use of game play mechanics for non-game applications.
  • It is important to remember that different people have different motivation stimuli – it’s not a case of one size fits all.
  • Other examples:
    At Google, engineers have been able to spend an in-house currency called ‘Goobles’ on server time — often a scarce resource at Google.
    SAP created a game to encourage workers to carpool in order to reduce the company’s carbon footprint.
    The Facebook game “Ayogo” which helps people with Diabetes to adopt healthier behaviours around diet and exercise.
  • Canada: McDonald’s customers have to create a little story by introducing characters that embody McDonald’s product. The winner will be rewarded by a private movie screening for his friends (i.e. cudos, recognition)
    McDonald’s 140 Character Film Contest: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8dwO1kTp7Cc
  • SickKids Pain Squad iPhone App by Cundari Group : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsl9NjyVpHY
    Researchers at Birmingham City University are teaming up with the cities Children’s Hospital to bring gamification to treatment of young people. The process is being designed to help teenagers at a time when many begin managing their own treatment and medical care. It’s aiming to help the transition from having a caregiver deliver the treatment to the teenager themselves giving it. The use of games is hoping to focus the minds of the young people involved so that they remember to deliver their care amidst the many distractions presented by teenage life. - See more at: http://www.adigaskell.org/blog/2014/02/22/gamification-of-childrens-health/#sthash.ifuJ7dRX.dpuf
  • Fleetly Fitness App and Website: http://www.fleetly.com/
  • I have (so far) been unable to uncover any detailed research, or case studies, that might reveal how effective these techniques are in improving user participation and engagement for Communities of Practice. However, it is doubtful that any of these techniques will have a direct effect on that ephemeral (but essential) attribute we call “trust”, which most community users will rank highly as a reason for CoP engagement. Trust is not something that can be easily measured; it’s a bit like freedom and air. You know when you don’t have it, but don’t give it much thought when you do.
    Oxytocin is a drug created in our brains, most famous as the hormone that forges the bond between mothers and newborn babies, but more recently identified as a stimulant of empathy, generosity and trust.
  • Badgeville, a major US Gamification Technology Vendor, suggest a set of gamification elements as being key components of their "Behaviour Platform" for supporting Game Mechanics covering:1. Points - Assign points for specific high value behaviours and achievements. 2. Achievements - Provide positive reinforcement for high-value user behaviours. 3. Levels - Signify levels of engagement across a company's ecosystem. 4. Missions - Create set of behaviours for users to perform to unlock specific rewards 5. Contests - Create a set of missions, and reward those who finish most quickly or effectively 6. Leaderboards -- Show people know where they stand as relative to their peers. 7. Notifications - Encourage engagement when users perform a desired behaviour8. Anti-Gaming Mechanics - Set limits on how often a behaviour can be rewarded
    One of the risks of these "magic bullet lists" is mechanism-centred design where game designers see a new or interesting game mechanism and simply decide to build it in instead of designing around the user.
  • Express: self-expression is a key driver for modern social gaming and social media - and a major motivator for engagement and purchases/monetisation. People who enjoy self-expression are motivated by gaining a richer palette and greater abilities to showcase their creativity and express who they are.
    Compete: competition drives social gameplay AND self-improvement (competing with yourself to improve your own metrics). People who enjoy competition assume everyone likes competition, but that's just one among many motivators - and often not the best.
    Explore: Exploring content,  people, tools, and worlds can be a rich and rewarding activity. People who enjoy exploring are motivated by information, access and knowledge; stand-alone points won't mean anything to them.
    Collaborate: collaboration and collective action are a purposeful, non-zero-sum way of socialising. From Facebook "likes" to Kickstarter projects, collaboration  is driving many of today's most innovative and influential social systems. People who enjoy collaboration like to "win together" with others, and be part of something larger than themselves.
    Gamification dates back to the 1996 publication of Bartle's Player Types Model. Game designer and professor Richard Bartle created an x, y axis detailing four types of people that interact in virtual worlds. These include:
    Killers: those who act against other game players - (Replaced by Express)
    Achievers: those who build up their in-game status - (Replaced by Compete)
    Explorers: those who gather artifacts and look around - Replaced by Explore)
    Socializers: those who build friendships - (Replaced by Collaborate)
    Amy Jo Kim, Ph.D. is a leading consultant on gamification as a business model to increase customer engagement. In 2010, Kim reworked Bartle's Player Types Model. She replaced the "Killer" type with "Express" -- a much more business- and school-friendly descriptor! Completing the axis, "Compete" took the place of "Achiever," "Explore" replaced "Explorer," and "Collaborate" replaced "Cooperate."
  • Google engineers have been able to spend an in-house currency called “Goobles” on server time, a scarce resource at Google. They can also use this ‘currency’ to bet on certain outcomes as part of a company-wide predictions market.
    Some restaurants, using Objective Logistics software, reward staff by allowing them to manage their own schedules.
    A key objective for any reward mechanism is to find ways to make work seem less like work.
  • Don’t develop game mechanisms that dole out points and badges like sugar pellets every time the user hits the right lever.
    A scene from Mark Twain’s Adventures of Tom Sawyer, Tom’s aunt orders him to whitewash a fence as punishment for playing hooky from school. He doesn’t relish this so he ricks several children to do the job for him by convincing them that the task is so enjoyable that he doesn’t want their help. The boys beg him to let them take over - they even pay him with twelve marbles, a piece of blue glass to look through, a kite, a key that wouldn’t unlock anything, and a dead rat he could swing from a string. Twain wrote: “Tom had discovered a great law of human action, namely, hat in order to make someone covet a thing, it is only necessary to make the thing difficult to attain”.
    If Tom had money, he might have tried to buy his way out of his plight - otherwise known as “extrinsic rewards”, that is, tangible benefits. Although they would have benefited from the cash, their hearts would not have really been in the task, which would have been categorised as “work”. Instead, Tom served up “intrinsic rewards”, by convincing the children that whitewashing a fence was fun.
  • Some people – wrongly - see gamification simply as the process of adding points, badges or rewards to the learning process and instantly creating engagement, interactivity and motivation for learning.
    When done correctly, gamification provides an experience that is inherently engaging and, most importantly, promotes learning. The elements of games that make for effective gamification are those of storytelling, which provides a context, challenge, immediate feedback, sense of curiosity, problem-solving, a sense of accomplishment, autonomy and mastery.
  • Quote: I choose a lazy person to do a hard job. Because a lazy person will find an easy way to do it. ― Bill Gates

Transcript

  • 1. Engagement Strategies & Techniques Stephen Dale @stephendale Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Image source: Gregory Menvielle @pyramedium www.collabor8now.com
  • 2. Gamification: Integrating game dynamics into your site, service, community or campaign in order to drive participation.
  • 3. Is It all Hype? Gamification source http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2575515
  • 4. Some Statistics • 80% Percent of Current Gamified Applications Will Fail to Meet Business Objectives Primarily Due to Poor Design (Source: Gartner) • Projected gamification growth to reach $5 billion ( £3 billion) by 2018 (Source: Mind Commerce) • In 2014, over 1,400 global organisations will deploy gamification applications for employee performance, healthcare, marketing and training. (Source: Gartner) • 80% of 2000 global organisations “will have gamified applications and/or processes” by 2017. (Source: Mind Commerce) • 50% of innovation practices will be gamified by 2015 (Source: Gartner) • 40% of all gamers are women (Source: Reality is Broken, Jane McGonigal) • 1 in 4 gamers is aged over 50 (Source: Reality is Broken, Jane McGonigal)
  • 5. Gamification - benefits What benefits can a company get in the workplace through gamification? - Increase the motivation and productivity of their employees - Align the expectations of workers with the company’s objectives - Inform the workers of all the new initiatives of the company - Convert the workers into advocates of the company
  • 6. Gamification is not..... Gamification is..... The process of applying game elements to non- game applications.
  • 7. Gamification is about much more than simply rewarding points and badges, but rather understanding and influencing the human behaviours companies want to encourage among their users. Gamification is founded in the fundamentals of human psychology and behavioral science, and rests on three primary factors: motivation, ability level and triggers.
  • 8. Some Examples Launched by the NHS in Dec 2013, “The Walk” is an app that uses gamification to encourage exercise. The game is designed to be constantly on and tracks how far players are walking in their everyday life. The further they walk, the more secrets of the story are unlocked. It will take players around three months to complete all 65 episodes depending on how much walking they do. Halton Borough Council has introduced RFID tags on bins to provide accurate tracking of the recycling efforts of each household. Points are awarded based on the weight of recycled products. These points can can be redeemed at local businesses for goods and services. Clubcards/Loyalty cards that influence shopping habits by giving rewards.
  • 9. Let’s look at some more examples..... For each example, think about: (a) What is the desired outcome. (b) What are the triggers that motivate the behaviours.
  • 10. McDonald’s and Gamification http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8dwO1kTp7Cc
  • 11. Health Gamification SickKids Pain Squad iPhone App by Cundari Group : http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsl9NjyVpHY
  • 12. Fitness Gamification Fleetly Fitness App and Website: http://www.fleetly.com/
  • 13. Gamification Techniques For Online Communities •Badges: Use to promote participation and reward employees and/or customers for reaching specific goals. For example, award a welcome badge for joining the community. Display earned badges on the member’s personal profile page. Points: Use to encourage engagement, collaboration and participation in online conversations. This could decrease support costs as more members look to the community for help. Campaigns. Use to encourage member participation. Track and monitor members' activities and let them know their current status, sending them information about how many points they need to achieve the next level (e.g. guru status). Leaderboards: Points could be used for building leaderboards, which can boost a member's reputation, or be used as a currency, e.g. exchanged for products, services or some other benefit.
  • 14. Gamification - The 4 Key Elements Image Source: http://h30615.www3.hp.com/thread/1142 nt nt
  • 15. Engagement Motivators Gamifying with Dr. Amy Jo Kim's Social Engagement Verbs Credit: Amy Jo Kim, Ph.D. http://amyjokim.com/2012/09/19/social-engagement-whos-playing-how-do-they-like-to-engage/
  • 16. ...but don’t rush in... Gamification should be well understood and planned out prior to implementation. Some questions to consider asking during the planning process include: •Be sure your organisation’s goals for using gamification are clear.This is an especially important step to take before getting too deep into the effort. It is far better to determine all of the goals of a gamification programme during the beginning stages. •Think carefully about your company culture.What types of rewards will motivate employees, and how can you build out a recognition programme that ties into the prevailing culture?
  • 17. Discuss What types of rewards will motivate people in your organisation? How would you develop an employee recognition programme that ties into the prevailing culture?
  • 18. Rewards...money isn’t everything Points could be redeemed for a day off or a team “happy hour”. Changing the rewards system periodically will ensure employees remain engaged and not get bored with the same-old options. Focus on activities first, and outcomes second. Don’t “game”the workers. Companies need to design game systems that enhance work, and not to exploit their workers.
  • 19. Who are the players?
  • 20. Further Reading & References • Gamifying with Dr.Amy Jo Kim's Social EngagementVerbs: Amy Jo Kim, Ph.D. • The BartleTest of Gamer Psychology: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bartle_Test • McDonald’s 140 Character Film Contest: http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=8dwO1kTp7Cc • SickKids Pain Squad iPhone App by Cundari Group : http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=qsl9NjyVpHY • Fleetly Fitness App andWebsite: http://www.fleetly.com/ • Gamification of children’s health: http://www.adigaskell.org/blog/2014/02/22/gamification-of- childrens-health/ Play at Work: how games inspire break-through thinking. Adam L Penenberg Unlocking the power of game dynamics in business and in life. Aaron Dignon
  • 21. Unless otherwise noted, this work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Email: steve.dale@collabor8now.com Twitter: @stephendale, @collabor8now Profile: http://about.me/stephendale “I was gratified to be able to answer promptly, and I did. I said I didn’t know.” ― Mark Twain www.collabor8now.com