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  • http://www.theonion.com/articles/number-of-users-who-actually-enjoy-facebook-down-t,29503/?ref=auto
  • Among the more positive impacts they see: the best students access a greater depth and breadth of information on topics that interest them; students can take advantage of the availability of educational material in engaging multimedia formats; and many become more self-reliant researchers.
     
    At the same time, these teachers juxtapose these benefits against some emerging concerns. Specifically, some teachers worry about students’ overdependence on search engines; the difficulty many students have judging the quality of online information; the general level of literacy of today’s students; increasing distractions pulling at students and poor time management skills; students’ potentially diminished critical thinking capacity; and the ease with which today’s students can borrow from the work of others.
     
    These teachers report that students rely mainly on search engines to conduct research, in lieu of other resources such as online databases, the news sites of respected news organizations, printed books, or reference librarians.
    Overall, the vast majority of these teachers say a top priority in today’s classrooms should be teaching students how to “judge the quality of online information.” As a result, a significant portion of the teachers surveyed here report spending class time discussing with students how search engines work, how to assess the reliability of the information they find online, and how to improve their search skills. They also spend time constructing assignments that point students toward the best online resources and encourage the use of sources other than search engines.
  • Large majorities also agree with the notion that the amount of information available online today is overwhelming to most students (83%) and that today’s digital technologies discourage students from using a wide range of sources when conducting research (71%).
  • http://profile.myspace.com/index.cfm?fuseaction=user.viewProfile&friendID=54465471
  • http://www.ipcmclean.org/
  • All the data presented in this talk is from our Teens, Social Media and Privacy report: http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Teens-Social-Media-And-Privacy.aspx
  • Source: The Pew Research Center Internet & American Life Project Teen & Parent surveys. Source: Teen data taken from surveys of teens age 12-17 conducted October-November 2006, September-November 2007, November 2007-February 2008, June-September 2009, April-July 2011, and July-September 2012 (n=802). Adult data taken from surveys of adults ages 18+ conducted August 2006, April-May 2009, August-September 2009, July-August 2011, and November-December 2012 (n=2,261). Methodological information for each survey is available from http://pewrsr.ch/ZLGBUL
  • Greater diversification of platforms used, end of MySpace. FB still dominant, though focus group data suggests its not always enjoyed.
    Source: The Pew Research Center's Internet & American Life Teen-Parent survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. n=802 for teens 12-17 and parents, including oversample of minority families. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish. The margin of error for teen social media users is +/- 5.1 percentage points.
    Note: This chart is based on an open-ended question that asks: “On which social networking site or sites do you have a profile or account?” and was asked of anyone who had answered yes to one or both of two previous questions “Do you ever use an online social networking site like MySpace or Facebook?” and “Do you ever use Twitter?” Sites listed for comparison were those that were reported in 2012 by at least one respondent.
    Asterisks (*) indicate that less than 1% of respondents gave the corresponding answer.
  • Important to remember than platforms themselves have shifted and changed over this time MySpace -> Facebook and then iterations on Facebook itself.
    Source: Pew Internet Parent/Teen Privacy Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. n=802 teens ages 12-17. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. Margin of error for results based on teen social media users is +/- 5.1 percentage points. Comparison data for 2006 comes from the Pew Internet Parents & Teens Survey, October 23-November 19, 2006. n=487 teens with a profile online. Margin of error is +/- 5.2 percentage points.
  • Age is most important variable here – older kids share more. And boys share their cell # more.
    Source: Pew Internet Teens and Privacy Management Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. n=802 parents of teens ages 12-17 and 802 teens ages 12-17. The margin of error for teen social media users is +/- 5.1 percentage points.
    Note: Rows marked with a superscript letter (a) indicate a statistically significant difference between that column and the column designated by that superscript letter. Statistical significance is determined inside the specific section covering each demographic trait.
  • Source: Pew Internet Parent/Teen Privacy Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. n=802 teens ages 12-17. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. Margin of error for results based on teen Facebook users is +/- 5.3 percentage points.
  • Source: Pew Internet Parent/Teen Privacy Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. n=802 teens ages 12-17. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. Margin of error for results based on teen social media users is +/- 5.1 percentage points.
    Note: Columns marked with a superscript letter (a) indicate a statistically significant difference between that row and the row designated by that supe
  • Source: Pew Internet Parent/Teen Privacy Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. n=802 teens ages 12-17. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. Margin of error for results based on teen social media users is +/- 5.1 percentage points.
    Note: Columns marked with a superscript letter (a) indicate a statistically significant difference between that row and the row designated by that superscript letter. Statistical significance is determined inside the specific section covering each demographic trait.
  • Source: Pew Internet Parent/Teen Privacy Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. n=802 teens ages 12-17. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. Margin of error for results based on teen social media users is +/- 5.1 percentage points.
    Note: Columns marked with a superscript letter (a) indicate a statistically significant difference between that row and the row designated by that superscript letter. Statistical significance is determined inside the specific section covering each demographic trait.
  • Source: Pew Internet Parent/Teen Privacy Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. n=802 teens ages 12-17. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. Margin of error for results based on teen social media users is +/- 5.1 percentage points.
    Note: Columns marked with a superscript letter (a) or indicate a statistically significant difference between that row and the row designated by that superscript letter. Statistical significance is determined inside the specific section covering each demographic trait.
  • Source: Pew Internet Parent/Teen Privacy Survey, July 26-September 30, 2012. n=802 teens ages 12-17. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. Margin of error for results based on teen social media users is +/- 5.1 percentage points.
    Note: Columns marked with a superscript letter (a) indicate a statistically significant difference between that row and the row designated by that superscript letter. Statistical significance is determined inside the specific section covering each row and column grouping in that row.
  • Source: Pew Research Center Internet & American Life Project Teens and Privacy Survey, July 26 – September 30, 2012. n=802 parents of 12-17 year olds, including an oversample of minority families. N=781 for parents of teen internet users. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. Margin of error is +/- 4.5 percentage points for the total sample of parents and +/- 4.6 percentage points for parents of teen internet users.
    Note: A full report that examines parents’ attitudes and actions around their children’s online privacy is available here: http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Teens-and-Privacy.aspx
  • When asked whether they thought Facebook gives anyone else access to the information they share:
    Data presented in this slide is from a series of online focus groups in mid-late 2012.
  • Data presented in this slide is from a series of online focus groups in mid-late 2012.
  • Source: Pew Research Center Internet & American Life Project Teens and Privacy Survey, July 26 – September 30, 2012. n=802 parents of 12-17 year olds, including an oversample of minority families. N=781 for parents of teen internet users. Interviews were conducted in English and Spanish and on landline and cell phones. Margin of error is +/- 4.5 percentage points for the total sample of parents and +/- 4.6 percentage points for parents of teen internet users.
    To read the full report: http://www.pewinternet.org/Reports/2013/Teens-Social-Media-And-Privacy.aspx
  • Data presented on this slide is from in-person focus groups with teens conducted in the Spring of 2013 in Boston, LA and Greensboro, NC.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Teens are Different And that’s OK Stephen Abram iSchool @ Toronto Jan.14, 2014
    • 2. Has The Future Changed?
    • 3. How?
    • 4. Has the future changed? Has our future changed?
    • 5. A Short List • Genomic knowledge • Nanotechnology • Thin – batteries, screens, etc. • Embedables and wearables • Bio-everything, Siri • Storage, Moore’s law • Wireless electricity • AI, Siri, Watson, ‘Her’ • • • • • • • • • • Stem Cells fMRI and The Brain Cloning Trucking and GPS Wind and other energy Robotics Massive Book Digitization Translation Streaming Media Seed Bank
    • 6. A 1965 iPhone
    • 7. Can libraries keep up with change? Can you recall buying a 45? Can you recall dials on TVs? Can you recall dialling?
    • 8. Books
    • 9. Books • • • • • • • • Print vs. digital (retronyms) Fiction vs. non fiction Articles vs. chapters Sound, visual, moving image, games, experiences Search vs. discovery Organization and storage Physical vs. device Ownership, access and use
    • 10. HOW MANY MOONS ARE THERE IN OUR SOLAR SYSTEM?
    • 11. 146 Moons plus 23 provisional moons
    • 12. Considering the Whole Experience
    • 13. 1 Fill That Gap 2.0 3
    • 14. PROGRAMS
    • 15. WHAT’S THE POINT?
    • 16. Opinion • Every collection facet should be justified reciprocally with a program • It should be persona not demographically based • Consider user and community goals: culture, employment, • Makerspaces (for all ages and including writing)
    • 17. Smelly Yellow Liquid Or Sex Appeal?
    • 18. Have Students Changed?
    • 19. News Flash The Internet and technology have now progressed well beyond their infancy.
    • 20. News Flash News Flash Shift Happens
    • 21. E-Learning
    • 22. E-Learning
    • 23. NextGen Differences       Increase in IQ - 15-25 Points Brain & Developmental Changes Eye Movement Changes Massive Behavioural Changes Major Decline in Crime Rates – 65%+ But still a 70% behavior overlap with Boomers (see Boomers & Beyond)
    • 24. Discovery & Ideas
    • 25. Has the future changed? Has our future changed?
    • 26. COWS, etc.
    • 27. Books
    • 28. Grocery Stores
    • 29. Cookbooks, Chefs . . .
    • 30. Cookbooks, Chefs . . .
    • 31. People Need Meals
    • 32. Trans-Literacy: Move beyond reading & PC skills         Reading literacy Numeracy Critical literacy Social literacy Computer literacy Web literacy Content literacy Written literacy         News literacy Technology literacy Information literacy Media literacy Adaptive literacy Research literacy Academic literacy Reputation, Etc.
    • 33. Can we frame the e-book issue so that it can be addressed rationally?
    • 34. MindMap: What is a book? Reading 1. Reading 2. Learning 3. Pedagogy 4. Scaffolds 5. Research 6. Exploration 7. Reference 8. Engagement 9. Enjoyment 10.Evaluation
    • 35. MindMap: What is a book? 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. Reading Learning Pedagogy Research Exploration Reference Engagement Enjoyment Evaluation
    • 36. What do we need to know? What are we going to do next?
    • 37. Be More Open to the Users’ Paths Filtering
    • 38. Serve Everyone!
    • 39. Teens and Libraries Lee Rainie Director Pew Research Center’s Internet & American Life Project Presented to: YALSA Teens and Libraries Summit January 23, 2013
    • 40. What is the Pew Internet Project? A comprehensive and groundbreaking new report released Monday by the Pew Research Center’s Internet and American Life Project has found that only four users of Facebook derive pleasure of .... “As it turns out, the vast majority of human any kindtend to become depressed when they beings from the popular social networking website. past five years of their life see the According to the report, the remainderin a of summarized right there in front of them the 950 million people registered with Facebook, sad little timeline,” said lead researcher John despite using the site on a regular basis, take no Elliott. joy in doing so, and in fact feel a profound sense of hopelessness and despair immediately upon logging in… Number Of Users Who Actually Enjoy Facebook Down To 4
    • 41. 7 takeaways from our research 1) 2) 3) 4) Teens live in a different information ecosystem Teens live in a different learning ecosystem Teens’ reading levels match/exceed adult levels Teens use libraries and librarians more than others, but don’t necessarily love libraries as much 5) Teens have different priorities in library services 6) Teens will behave differently in the world to come 7) The public and teachers recognize this and want libraries to adjust to it
    • 42. 7 takeaways from our research 1) 2) 3) 4) Teens live in a different information ecosystem Teens live in a different learning ecosystem Teens’ reading levels match/exceed adult levels Teens’ use libraries and librarians more than others, but don’t necessarily love libraries as much 5) Teens have their own priorities for library services 6) Teens will behave differently in the world to come 7) The public and teachers recognize this and want libraries to adjust to it
    • 43. The super-tech-saturated teens • 95% use internet / ~ three-quarters have broadband at home ~ 60%-70% access internet on mobile device • 78% have cell phones / 47% have smartphones – 80% have desktop/laptop – 23% have tablet computers • 81% use social networking sites – 24% use Twitter – Approx. from young adult data: a quarter of teens use Instagram; 1 in 7 use Pinterest; 1 in 10 use Tumblr
    • 44. Other factoids • Teens who play video games: 97% • Young adults (YA) who own e-reader or tablet: 50% • YA who prefer to get call rather than text: 45% • YA who prefer to get text rather than call: 40% • YA who have bumped into another person or object when they were concentrating on cell phone: 41% • YA who have been bumped into by another person concentrating on her/his phone: 61%
    • 45. The traits of networked information • • • • • • • Pervasively generated Pervasively consumed Personal Participatory / social Linked Continually edited Multi-platformed • Real-time / just-in-time • Timeless / searchable • Given meaning through social networks and “algorithmic authority”
    • 46. 7 takeaways from our research 1) 2) 3) 4) Teens live in a different information ecosystem Teens live in a different learning ecosystem Teens’ reading levels match/exceed adult levels Teens use libraries and librarians more than others, but don’t necessarily love libraries as much 5) Teens have their own priorities for library services 6) Teens will behave differently in the world to come 7) The public and teachers recognize this and want libraries to adjust to it
    • 47. Online survey of 2,462 teachers with College Board and National Writing Project • 77% of teachers surveyed say the internet and digital search tools have had a “mostly positive” impact on their students’ research work • 87% agree these technologies are creating an “easily distracted generation with short attention spans”
    • 48. Online survey of 2,462 teachers with College Board and National Writing Project • 76% of the teachers in this study strongly agree “the internet enables students to access a wider range of resources than would otherwise be available” • 76% strongly agree that internet search engines have conditioned students to expect to be able to find information quickly and easily
    • 49. Online survey of 2,462 teachers with College Board and National Writing Project • 65% agree to some extent that “the internet makes today’s students more selfsufficient researchers” 83% agree that the amount of information available online today is overwhelming to most students
    • 50. Online survey of 2,462 teachers with College Board and National Writing Project • 90% agree that the internet encourages learning by connecting students to resources about topics of interest to them • 71% agree that today’s digital technologies discourage students from using a wide range of sources when conducting research
    • 51. Grading students’ research skills
    • 52. “Today’s students are really no different from previous generations, they just have different tools through which to express themselves.” Agree Disagree 47% 52%
    • 53. 7 takeaways from our research 1) 2) 3) 4) Teens live in a different information ecosystem Teens live in a different learning ecosystem Teens’ reading levels match/exceed adult levels Teens use libraries and librarians more than others, but don’t necessarily love libraries as much 5) Teens have their own priorities for library services 6) Teens will behave differently in the world to come 7) The public and teachers recognize this and want libraries to adjust to it
    • 54. How many books Americans read Among book readers, the mean and median number of books each group read in the past 12 months, among all Americans ages 16 and older Mean number of books read (average) Median (midpoint) All those 16 and older 17 8 Ages 16-17 (n=144) 18 10 Ages 18-24 (n=298) 17 7 Ages 25-29 (n=186) 17 6 Ages 30-39 (n=434) 14 6 Ages 40-49 (n=449) 15 6 Ages 50-64 (n=804) 18 8 Ages 65+ (n=622) 23 12
    • 55. Reading on a “typical day” (among book readers)
    • 56. Young readers are instrumental readers
    • 57. Young e-book readers read on all kinds of devices
    • 58. 7 takeaways from our research 1) 2) 3) 4) Teens live in a different information ecosystem Teens live in a different learning ecosystem Teens’ reading levels match/exceed adult levels Teens use libraries and librarians more than others, but don’t necessarily love libraries as much 5) Teens have their own priorities for library services 6) Teens will behave differently in the world to come 7) The public and teachers recognize this and want libraries to adjust to it
    • 59. Used library in past year
    • 60. Got help from a librarian (among library users)
    • 61. How important is the library?
    • 62. 7 takeaways from our research 1) 2) 3) 4) Teens live in a different information ecosystem Teens live in a different learning ecosystem Teens’ reading levels match/exceed adult levels Teens use libraries and librarians more than others, but don’t necessarily love libraries as much 5) Teens have their own priorities for library services 6) Teens will behave differently in the world to come 7) The public and teachers recognize this and want libraries to adjust to it
    • 63. Teens say they would likely use …
    • 64. 7 takeaways from our research 1) 2) 3) 4) Teens live in a different information ecosystem Teens live in a different learning ecosystem Teens’ reading levels match/exceed adult levels Teens use libraries and librarians more than others, but don’t necessarily love libraries as much 5) Teens have their own priorities for library services 6) Teens will behave differently in the world to come 7) The public and teachers recognize this and want libraries to adjust to it
    • 65. How will hyperconnected Millennials live? http://pewinternet.org/Reports/2012/Hyperconnected-lives.aspx
    • 66. Vote for …
    • 67. Millennials’ future • In 2020 the brains of multitasking teens and young adults are "wired" differently from those over age 35 and overall it yields helpful results. They do not suffer notable cognitive shortcomings as they multitask and cycle quickly through personal- and work-related tasks. Rather, they are learning more and they are more adept at finding answers to deep questions, in part because they can search effectively and access collective intelligence via the Internet. In sum, the changes in learning behavior and cognition among the young generally produce positive outcomes.
    • 68. … or …
    • 69. Millennials’ future • In 2020, the brains of multitasking teens and young adults are "wired" differently from those over age 35 and overall it yields baleful results. They do not retain information; they spend most of their energy sharing short social messages, being entertained, and being distracted away from deep engagement with people and knowledge. They lack deep-thinking capabilities; they lack face-to-face social skills; they depend in unhealthy ways on the Internet and mobile devices to function. In sum, the changes in behavior and cognition among the young are generally negative outcomes.
    • 70. Millennials’ future Change for the better 52% Change for the worse 42%
    • 71. Theme - Supertaskers
    • 72. Theme – New winners/losers
    • 73. Theme – Distracted
    • 74. Participatory, creative class -extras Close to three-quarters of online teens have created content for the internet January 9, 2009 114
    • 75. Other content creation 39% of online teens have shared their own creations online January 9, 2009 115
    • 76. Other content creation ~37% of online teens have rated a person, product, or service online January 9, 2009 116
    • 77. Other content creation 26% of online teens report keeping their own personal webpage January 9, 2009 117
    • 78. Other content creation ~25% of online teens have created or worked on webpages or blogs for others, including those for groups or school assignments January 9, 2009 118
    • 79. Other content creation 20% of online teens say they remix content they find online into their own artistic creations January 9, 2009 119
    • 80. 7 takeaways from our research 1) 2) 3) 4) Teens live in a different information ecosystem Teens live in a different learning ecosystem Teens’ reading levels match/exceed adult levels Teens use libraries and librarians more than others, but don’t necessarily love libraries as much 5) Teens have their own priorities for library services 6) Teens will behave differently in the world to come 7) The public and teachers recognize this and want libraries to adjust to it
    • 81. Teachers press for literacy • 57% spend class time helping students improve their search skills • 35% devote class time to helping students understand how search engines work and how search results are generated • Asked what curriculum changes might be necessary in middle and high schools today, 47% “strongly agree” and 44% “somewhat agree” that courses or content focusing on digital literacy must be incorporated into every school’s curriculum.
    • 82. New literacies are being elevated - navigation literacy - connections and context literacy - skepticism - value of contemplative time - how to create content - personal information literacy - ethical behavior in new world June 25, 2010 122
    • 83. Libraries.pewinternet.org Lee Rainie Email: lrainie@pewinternet.org Twitter: @Lrainie Kathryn Zickuhr Email: kzickuhr@pewinternet.org Twitter: @kzickuhr Kristen Purcell Email: @kpurcell@pewinternet.org Twitter: @kristenpurcell
    • 84. Teens, Social Media and Privacy: Reputation management, third party access & exposure to advertising June 25, 2013 Maryland Children’s Online Privacy Workgroup Amanda Lenhart Senior Researcher, Director of Teens & Technology Pew Research Center
    • 85. About Pew Internet / Pew Research • Part of the Pew Research Center, a non-partisan “fact tank” in Washington, DC • Studies how people use digital technologies • Does not promote specific technologies or make policy recommendations • Data for this talk is from nationally representative telephone surveys of U.S. adults and teens (on landlines and cell phones) Twitter version: We’re the public opinion, “just the facts”, non-advocacy, nonpolicy part of the Pew universe
    • 86. Teens care about privacy and take technical & non-technical steps to manage it. • Teen Twitter use up significantly; Facebook remains dominant platform • Teens are sharing more details about themselves on profiles, but few do so publicly • Teens take steps to manage their reputations online by curating content they and others post to social media sites. •Teens do not show high levels of concern over third party use of their personal information •Teens express mixed feelings about advertising practices •
    • 87. Teens care about privacy and take technical & non-technical steps to manage it. • Teen Twitter use up significantly; Facebook remains dominant platform • Teens are sharing more details about themselves on profiles, but few do so publicly • Teens take steps to manage their reputations online by curating content they and others post to social media sites. •Teens do not show high levels of concern over third party use of their personal information •Teens express mixed feelings about advertising practices
    • 88. Teens care about privacy and take technical & non-technical steps to manage it. • Teen Twitter use up significantly; Facebook remains dominant platform. • Teens are sharing more details about themselves on profiles, but few do so publicly. • Teens take steps to manage their reputations online by curating content they and others post to social media sites. •Teens do not show high levels of concern over third party use of their personal information. •Teens express mixed feelings about advertising practices.
    • 89. Teens care about privacy and take technical & non-technical steps to manage it. • Teen Twitter use up significantly; Facebook remains dominant platform. • Teens are sharing more details about themselves on profiles, but few do so publicly. • Teens take steps to manage their reputations online by curating content they and others post to social media sites. •Teens do not show high levels of concern over third party use of their personal information. •Teens express mixed feelings about advertising practices.
    • 90. Teens don’t always have a good understanding about how their personal data is used: Middle Schooler: “Anyone who isn’t friends with me cannot see anything about my profile except my name and gender.  I don’t believe that [Facebook] would do anything with my info.” High Schooler: “I don’t know if Facebook gives access to others.  I hope not.” High School Boy: “I don’t think [Facebook] should give anyone access to profile information.” High School Girl: “It depends on what kind of profile information they’d share. If it was only my age and gender, I wouldn’t mind.  If they went into detail and shared personal things, I would mind!” High school boy: “I don’t think it would be fair because it is my information and should not be shared with others, unless I decide to.”
    • 91. Other teens were more knowledgeable about information sharing with third parties, and were often philosophical about the reasons why that information might be shared. High school boy: “I think that Facebook gives apps and ads info to try and give you ads that pertain to you.” Middle school boy: “I know that Facebook gives access to my info to other companies.  I don’t like that they do it, but they have the right to so you cannot help it.”
    • 92. Teens care about privacy and take technical & non-technical steps to manage it. • Teen Twitter use up significantly; Facebook remains dominant platform. • Teens are sharing more details about themselves on profiles, but few do so publicly. • Teens take steps to manage their reputations online by curating content they and others post to social media sites. •Teens do not show high levels of concern over third party use of their personal information. •Teens express mixed feelings about advertising practices.
    • 93. Exposure to inappropriate ads • 30% of teens say they’ve received online advertising that is “clearly inappropriate” for their age. • Equally likely to encounter inappropriate ads based on age, sex, SES status or location. • “Inappropriate” was defined by the respondent – could be younger, could be older.
    • 94. Male (age 17): “Those ads are annoying. There’s no point for those ads.” Male (age 16): “It's mostly just bands and musicians that I ‘like’ [on Facebook], but also different companies that I ‘like’, whether they're clothing or mostly skateboarding companies. I can see what they're up to, whether they're posting videos or new products... [because] a lot of times you don't hear about it as fast, because I don't feel the need to Google every company that I want to keep up with every day. So with the news feed, it's all right there, and you know exactly.” Male (age 13): “I usually just hit allow on everything [when I get a new app]. Because I feel like it would get more features. And a lot of people allow it, so it's not like they're going to single out my stuff. I don't really feel worried about it.”
    • 95. alenhart@pewresearch.org @amanda_lenhart @pewinternet @pewresearch
    • 96. What do I care about? Stephen Abram, MLS
    • 97. ROLE OF LIBRARIAN(S), TEACHERS, ADMINISTRATION
    • 98. VALUE AND PROOFS ADVOCACY
    • 99. CURRICULUM ALIGNMENT
    • 100. ASSESSMENT
    • 101. READABILITY: LEXILES
    • 102. DEVELOPMENTAL ISSUES
    • 103. SCAFFOLDING: AGE / STAGE
    • 104. EXPERIENCE PORTALS
    • 105. LEARNING STYLES
    • 106. FROM GROCERY STORE TO MEAL
    • 107. FRAMING: THE ROLE OF ENCYCLOPEDIA
    • 108. DISCOVERY
    • 109. THE DIGITAL SHIFT CREATES WEAKNESSES TOO
    • 110. PRIMARY SOURCES
    • 111. SECONDARY SOURCES
    • 112. TERTIARY, NEXT GENERATION SOURCES
    • 113. BEYOND TEXT
    • 114. INFORMATION ETHICS: CITATION
    • 115. SAFETY: IDENTITY, PRIVACY, BULLYING, CONFIDENTIALITY, PURCHASING, …
    • 116. PARTNERSHIPS FOR ACTION
    • 117. SUSTAINABLE PARTNERSHIPS
    • 118. PUBLIC LIBRARY / SCHOOL LIBRARY PARTNERSHIPS
    • 119. GAMIFICATION
    • 120. TECHNOLOGY SKILLS: BYOD, FORMAT, SEARCH, …
    • 121. SCALABILITY
    • 122. IMPACT: OUTPUTS, MEASUREMENTS, PERFORMANCE, …
    • 123. PREPAREDNESS
    • 124. THE WORLD THEY’LL SUCCEED IN AND NOT THE ONE THAT’S OVER
    • 125. DISCUSSION
    • 126. To whom do I listen and follow?         Justin Hoenke YALSA Michael Stephens Sara Houghton Buffy Hamilton Bobbie Newman Gretchen Caserotti David Lee King  Rebecca Jones & Jane Dysart  Seth Godin  Blake Carver  JP Porcaro  Patrick Sweeney  Aaron Schmidt  Don Tapscott  Aaron
    • 127. er of libraries The pow
    • 128. Stephen Abram, MLS, FSLA VP strategic partnerships and markets Cengage Learning (Gale) Cel: 416-669-4855 stephen.abram@cengage.com Stephen’s Lighthouse Blog http://stephenslighthouse.com Facebook: Stephen Abram LinkedIn / Plaxo: Stephen Abram Twitter: sabram SlideShare: StephenAbram1

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