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Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
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Ola archetypes
Ola archetypes
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Ola archetypes
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Ola archetypes
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Ola archetypes
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Ola archetypes
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Ola archetypes

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  • General rules Never ask a direct question Simulate real or “imagined” experience Ritualize anecdote capture The anecdote circle Common experience Stimulate “ditting” Can be virtual or physical
  • A combination of archetypes, values and themes that represents a market expectation of a product or service.
  • Persona Elements Demographics Typical Day Information interests Information seeking behavior Ultimate goal Frustrations Work activities Computer skills, knowledge, abilities Technology attributes Communicating Market size, influence
  • Work activities : Dual-income household – both parents work . Computer skills, knowledge and abilities: Has a shared space home computer and is aware of the library website. Both parent and teenager are computer-literate. Technology attributes: Positive towards technology. Communicating: She uses the phone, Instant Messenger and Email. They prefer the phone or Email but chat with their teens over IM. Market size and influence : This group represents a large portion of the tax paying base within a community and is a great person for the library to have as an advocate because she is active and likes using the library. While frustrated with some issues at the library, it’s not for sure whether she sees her current interaction as a negative. Does she really want to not have to go to the library? Demographic/online attributes : The parent user is typically female, white, educated, married, over 35 and uses a branch library. IM and text messaging keep teens in touch with their parents. Most teens use shared computers at home and a growing number log on from libraries, school, and other locations. 67% of parents of online teens believe the Internet is a good thing for their child but are concerned about the safety of it. 90% of teens who go online say that other family members also use the computer. Many parents use various methods of filtering and monitoring teen computer use. (See High School Anchor for other related demographic data).
  • Information-seeking behavior: She typically doesn’t have time to use the computer at the library. At the library she is usually busy looking after the children either participating in a reading group session, or attending a storytelling session. She uses the computer at home to put materials on reserve for herself or if she knows exactly what she wants for the kids. She picks up the books, DVD’s or videos when she is leaving the library. She uses the library website to hear more about upcoming events. Ultimate goal : She wants her child to learn to read and to discover new ideas in a safe, informed setting. She wants her children to be exposed to books early on – even when they don’t know how to read yet. She wants to be able to find time to meet some of their own needs knowing their children are safe. Frustrations : Not finding librarians who can help the children to learn to read, is troubled by reduced library hours (nights and weekends), and wants to have an easy way to know about upcoming events on the website. Work activities : Part-time employment . Computer skills, knowledge and abilities : Has an up-to-date home computer and uses the library website . Technology attributes : Positive towards technology—early mainstream adopter. Communicating : She uses the phone, email, IM. Market size and influence : Significant Market presence-- Demographic/online attributes : 83% of parents with minor children use the Internet; 63% of college educated women who have infant children work; 5.4 million stay at home Moms in 2003. Information-seeking behavior: She typically doesn’t have time to use the computer at the library. At the library she is usually busy looking after the children either participating in a reading group session, or attending a storytelling session. She uses the computer at home to put materials on reserve for herself or if she knows exactly what she wants for the kids. She picks up the books, DVD’s or videos when she is leaving the library. She uses the library website to hear more about upcoming events. Ultimate goal : She wants her child to learn to read and to discover new ideas in a safe, informed setting. She wants her children to be exposed to books early on – even when they don’t know how to read yet. She wants to be able to find time to meet some of their own needs knowing their children are safe. Frustrations : Not finding librarians who can help the children to learn to read, is troubled by reduced library hours (nights and weekends), and wants to have an easy way to know about upcoming events on the website. Work activities : Part-time employment . Computer skills, knowledge and abilities : Has an up-to-date home computer and uses the library website . Technology attributes : Positive towards technology—early mainstream adopter. Communicating : She uses the phone, email, IM. Market size and influence : Significant Market presence-- Demographic/online attributes : 83% of parents with minor children use the Internet; 63% of college educated women who have infant children work; 5.4 million stay at home Moms in 2003. Sample Scenario : Marcy is interested in taking her 2 year old to storytime and in getting “learning to read” materials for her 4 year old. In preparation for an upcoming library trip, Marcie logs on to the library website and selects recipe and craft books for herself, and verifies the storytime for her toddlers. While at the library, she picks up her reserved books, takes her kids to storytime, may select some additional materials, and request assistance from a librarian on the topic of phonics.
  • Work activities : Part-time student, part-time worker. Student in a night school or junior/community college Computer skills, knowledge and abilities : Does not own a computer but is a computer user. Knows how to search on the Internet and is familiar with the library’s website. Easily authors and prints using productivity tools. Technology attributes : Positive towards technology. Communicating: She uses the phone and may have access to Email. Market size and influence : Although less than 8% of patrons fall into this demographic, it is a target demographic for our customers and the general public in the library as a community benefactor. Demographic/online attributes : Very likely earns less than $30k per year; is likely Hispanic or African American. Does not own a computer and is likely to have a cell phone.
  • Transcript

    • 1. UnderstandingMembers at aDeeper Level:Archetypes,Personas,Program Plansand StrategyStephen AbramDysart & Jones AssociatesMay 2, 2013
    • 2. ©2004 The Kennedy Group2What are libraries most worriedabout?1. Sustaining Relevance2. Changing user behaviors3. Diversity Services4. E-Learning and Distance Education5. Justifying growth and projects – Measures & Stories not Stats6. Understanding mutating (not changing) usage patterns – insightnot data7. Building community alliances but bringing gravitas to the table8. Building for the future and not repairing the present9. Productivity and shifting staff resources, setting priorities10.Balancing print, electronic and new services and resources11.Challenged Funding, Budgets and Fundraising12.Technological and other ‘change’
    • 3. ©2004 The Kennedy Group3How do you persuade?• Data, charts and graphs – help but dry• Debate & Argument – a little confrontational• Conversation – a lot of effort, scales poorly• Narrative storytelling – captures the energy ofthe population and persists
    • 4. ©2004 The Kennedy Group4Strategic Thinking• Moving Beyond Association Demographics• Embedding the Members’ Needs Everywhere• Understanding the Member’s age/stage,context and goals at an institutional andpersonal psychographic level
    • 5. ©2004 The Kennedy Group5What do stories do?• Preserve culture• Create chains of people• Create an environment for memory• Convey information and knowledge• Deliver content and context• Deliver change as renewal and renaissance
    • 6. ©2004 The Kennedy Group6http://www.stevedenning.com/Slide-show.html
    • 7. ©2004 The Kennedy Group7http://www.stevedenning.com/Slide-show.html
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    • 12. ©2004 The Kennedy Group12www.stevedenning.com
    • 13. Why am Italking aboutstories?
    • 14. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupI always find that statistics are hard toswallow and impossible to digest. The onlyone I can ever remember is that if all thepeople who go to sleep in church were laidend to end, they would be a lot morecomfortable.Mrs. Robert A. Taft
    • 15. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupIf you cant Measure ityou cant control it If you cant Control ityou cant improve itIf you cant Improveyou cant competeIf you cant Competeyou cease to exist
    • 16. ©2004 The Kennedy Group16What Problemdo we want / haveto Solve ?
    • 17. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupAlan CooperAlan Cooper wasthe father ofpersonas and theiruse in technologyand organizationaldesign and strategy.17Alan Cooper 2010
    • 18. ©2004 The Kennedy Group18Personas
    • 19. ©2004 The Kennedy Group• There is no Ruth....• Personas are hypothetical representations ofa natural grouping of users that drivedecision-making for strategic projects.– The people are defined by goals.– They focus on what is valuable to them and subsequently onhow he or she behaves.• They are not Stereotypes or Archetypes©The Kennedy GroupPersonas
    • 20. ©2004 The Kennedy Group• Personas defined:– Personas are hypothetical representations of a natural grouping ofusers that drive decision-making for development projects.– They are not real people, but they represent real people.– They are defined by goals.– They focus on what is valuable to the user and subsequently on howhe or she behaves.Purpose/Impact/Process/Roles/Case Study/Next Steps
    • 21. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupStrategyClarity of buyer and userbased strategy.Achievement of desiredposition in the market.Increase in Brand/reputation.Industry recognition.Generate new revenue.Customers and UsersProduct satisfaction.Support satisfaction.User satisfaction.Usability.Usage.Repeat customers.New customers.EmployeesDegree of Product, User, and Marketunderstanding.Number and frequency of Productcontributions.OperationsTime to market.Effective process handoffs.Usefulness across the product cycle.FinancialsProgramming costs.Cost compared toother product launches.Purpose/Impact/Process/Roles/Case Study/Next Steps
    • 22. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupGoals: Help team build the base infrastructure for .NET products. Construct the base set of services thatship with the product and compose the core of a distributed framework for hosting distributed services. Addqueuing semantics and associated locking, classification and routing of messages, subscriptions, efficientfiltering, fan-out, etc., to the server. Integrate new distributed communication semantics to the existing SQLServer programming model. Demonstrate ability to communicate and work well with other teams.Usage Scenario: Henry has been around long enough to build a solid network of resources to callwhen he has specific questions about products or programs. He often learns about new technologies orprocesses through casual conversation with his friends and coworkers in the hallway. He uses Yahoo! forgeneral information gathering because he likes the simplicity of the site design and the breadth of informationavailable.The Portal is not his start page—he usually just types in the URL directly. He rarely reads the content on thefirst page because he doesnt want to know whats going on with general companywide PR information. Hessomewhat cynical about "companywide" internal releases and dislikes company politics. However, on apersonal level, he does want to know about the schedules that the applications are on so he can plan. Hesfrustrated that theres no place you can go to find product information all in one spot.Info-Seeking Behavior: When Henry needs specific information, he generally e-mails or phonesa friend. He is a member of about 15 different DLs that used to be manageable, but now he finds itincreasingly difficult to keep up.He typically uses the Portal to search for internal information across the companywide intranet or to find otherinternal sites. He comes to the portal about four-five times a week by typing in the URL and stays for less than15 minutes at a time. He rarely, if ever, goes to there to find general information about the company or theindustry as a whole. He uses internal databases to find internal information on products or code. If hesfrustrated by something, hell go there and find solutions rather than go outside to support or to a dot-com."You used to have to drill down pretty deep to find personalized information, but now its easier." He tends tobookmark pages in the portal because he hates having to go 5 levels down. Hell use that bookmark until itbreaks, then he has to research it again. He would like to have favorites on the portal.Henry41 Years Old,Software Design EngineerU.S.12 Years at the company.Single,MS Comput.Sci©The Kennedy GroupPersonas
    • 23. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupDraft Foundation Document Elements:• Overview: Describe the persona, their work and personal life.• A day in the life: Follow the persona through a “typical” day.• Work activities: Job description, job role, main job tasks.• Household and leisure activities: What the persona does outside of work.• Goals, fears, aspirations, pet peeves: Understand what motivates the persona in their personal life,career and work.• Ultimate goal: What the goal is that the persona wants to achieve.• Computer skills, knowledge and abilities: Learn about their experience.• Technology attributes: Understand the personas view of technology, past and future.• Usage scenario: Understand the personas use of the product suite today, what is necessary use, whatis daily use, what they desire.• Information-seeking behavior: Understand how the persona seeks out and uses information at home,at work and at the library. Include the information that is hard and easy to find – as well as that which isthe most important for them. Articulate what is necessary, what is daily, what is desired.• Communicating: Understand how the persona keeps in touch with people.• Market size and influence: Understand the impact the persona has on the SIRSI business.• Demographic attributes: Understand the demographic information about the persona and those intheir immediate family.• Quotes: What the persona has to say.• References: Sources used to create the document.Who/What/How(3)/When/Where
    • 24. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupSummary• Work purpose (customers, products, organizational efficiency)• Type of work (procedural, heuristic, executive)• Work processes – formal and informal• Role• Function• Demographics (geography, language, time in organization etc.)• Decisions and decision style• Knowledge needed to make decisions• Information needed to support the knowledge needed• Motivation factors/value• Comfort with technology (ies)Know Your Audience
    • 25. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupPeople and Membership NeedsBrendan BrianPattyDianneHenry Heath
    • 26. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupPeople and their PersonaHenry
    • 27. ©2004 The Kennedy Grouphttp://advertising.msn.com/home/MSNPersonas.asp©The Kennedy GroupPersonas
    • 28. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupInformationSeeking/UseBehaviorInformation andKnowledgeInformationChannel©The Kennedy GroupPersonas
    • 29. ©2004 The Kennedy Group• Personas are understood throughdiscovery by:– Gathering data to identify possible “anchors”– Observing behavior– Pattern emergence in narrative throughsurveys and conversations©The Kennedy GroupPersonas
    • 30. ©2004 The Kennedy Group• Do you know what the next informationproducts, programs and services need to befor your members ......in this quickly changing, complex, highlydiverse world?TheFuture©The Kennedy Group
    • 31. ©2004 The Kennedy Group• Public Library Cardholder Personas• Academic and School Personas• Librarian Personas• Faculty Personas• Business Personas• Specific persons in medicine, law,science, engineering, & students• U. S. and CanadaMy Experience©The Kennedy Group
    • 32. ©2004 The Kennedy Group• Starting with understanding members interms of their:– needs, preferences, and desires– goals and aspirations– expectations and assumptions– values and their beliefs– tolerance for risk and changeThe Future©The Kennedy Group
    • 33. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupOur Approach• Narrative capture and identification ofcharacters, issues and problems,behaviors and actions.• Narrative pattern review of content,service and product needs• Identification of priority requirements forspecific market identities i.e. personas
    • 34. Narrative
    • 35. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupWhy Narrative Capture?• Knowledge can only be volunteered itcannot be conscripted• I only know what I know when I need toknow it• I always know more than I can say and I willalways say more than I can write down
    • 36. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupAnecdote Circles Starter Statements• Describe your day at the library.• Describe a day that you wanted to achievesomething but couldn’t.• Give us an example of when you learnedsomething from others at the library.• Give us an example of when you tried tolearn something from others at the librarybut didn’t.• Give us an example from the past when youmay have used OLA and were surprisedabout what you found.• Give us an example from the past when youdecided you wouldn’t be able to engage withOLA for the needs you had.The six (6) town halls to be held inJune 2013
    • 37. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupSummary GroupingsArchetypes Themes Values•Good Citizenship•Patrons•Library Staff•Money•Library Services andFacilities•Interaction•Technology•Efficiency•Money•Community•Learning•Quality•Efficiency•Money/RiskIdeal StateIssues
    • 38. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupArchetypes: CharactersArchetype Summary024681012Archetype NamesNumberofArchetypesGood CitizenshipPatronsLibrary StaffMoneyLibrary Servicesand Facilities
    • 39. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupGood Citizenship ArchetypesCollaborateCommunity bringspeople togetherCozyDiverse activitiesEncourage creativityGood use of our moneyHuman contactIntellectualopportunitiesKids feel safeNurturingOpportunities – socialSecurityWilling to chat whentime permitsWell-Rounded Citizen(13 attributes)
    • 40. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupGood Citizenship ArchetypesCommunity builderConnectedConnecting withcommunityGives people missionNetworkingPulls communitytogetherStrong Community Leader(6 attributes)
    • 41. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupPatron ArchetypesAnnoyingBooks out of printDisruptionIndifferenceLack of wirelessNo tape playerOnline servicesunavailableOut of datePhysical painRipped/missingpieces, out of datemagazineWasted resourcesWasted spaceFrustrated Patron(12 attributes)
    • 42. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupPatron ArchetypesAfter hours usageBroader search resultsComputer useIntroduction to newthingsLots of preferencesNo online access outsideof libraryNot a free serviceOpen to publicOutside sourcesSearch methodUniversal accessWays to get informationInquisitive Power User(12 attributes)
    • 43. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupPatron ArchetypesCan’t get book you want(timely)Don’t listen toreviews/bad reviews (NPRReviews)EmbarrassingFear of puppetsForgot card/licenseHead achesInjuriesSome people consider awaste of money/space(crafts)Too longDisengaged Seeker(9 attributes)
    • 44. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupLibrary Staff ArchetypesAdvance reserve on newmaterialsAbundance of itemsOne-stop shoppingVideo/DVD lost in dropboxAccess to materials neveraffordUp to date, currentmaterialsDiversity of materialsUltimate Tour Guide(7 attributes)
    • 45. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupLibrary Services ArchetypesOut-of-Date IT(6 attributes)Access to PC’sMessage is too long(automated computersystem)Not enough computersSlow re-bootStrong databaseTechnical-media options
    • 46. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupLibrary Services ArchetypesCan’t remove referencematerialExtensive collectionLibrary for books, notmovie rentalsLibrary for education films,not Hollywood movies“Something for Everyone” Resources(4 attributes)
    • 47. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupThemes: Issues and ProblemsThemes05101520Theme NamesNumberofThemesInteractionTechnologyEfficiencyMoneyOther
    • 48. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupValues: Behaviors and ActionsValues012345678910Value GroupingNumberofValuesCommunityLearningQualityEfficiencyMoney/RiskOther
    • 49. Pattern Review
    • 50. Personas
    • 51. ©2004 The Kennedy Group7 SirsiDynix Personas• Discovery Dan– Dan represents the adult non-researcher population.• Haley High School– Haley represents the high school student population.• Jennifer– Jennifer represents the parents of teenagers.• Mommy Marcie– Marcie represents the parents of young children.• Rick Researcher– Rick represents adult researchers who own a personal computer.• Senior Sally– Sally represents senior citizens.• Tasha Learner– Tasha represents adult researchers who do not own a personalcomputer.
    • 52. A typical day at the library: Stops by the library either on their way to or from work or over theirlunch break. May spend time on the weekend if they have a home project. Have requested thebooks or DVD’s online so is either dropping them off or picking the materials up. Enjoyslectures, classes or other non-traditional activities. Appreciates connecting with the library staffduring visitsInformation-seeking behavior: Usually checks online to see what has newly arrived at the library.If they have time during their stop over at the library itself, they will browse what is new in thenonfiction and music; maybe the fiction shelf as well. Uses the library to avoid the cost ofbuying materials. May purchase books after reviewing them in the library. Signs out DVD’sand movies for entertainment. Appreciates the book club(s), even if not an active participant.Also seeks community information (pamphlets, etc.) Reads on-line reviews of booksUltimate goal: To pick up the books, music or videos they are interested in. Or to simply discoverbooks or other material that piques their interest to expand their mindsFrustrations: Changing library hours. Unpredictable Internet search results. Pop-ups, spam.Librarians who aren’t very good at referring them to specific sources or best sources on a giventopic – could be people as often as written information. Wishes libraries would coordinateculling of collections and try to keep at least one copy of a book in one of the libraries. Needsmore consumer-friendly categorization of material. Parking (downtown users) Hours need tomatch commute schedule. Wait-lists for books so long that they are compelled to purchase thebook from Amazon.
    • 53. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupA typical day at the library: They are not daily users of public libraries. When they do come theyfocus on magazines, newspapers or quickly check their email or browse the Internet. If theydon’t have a good school library they will come to the public library after conducting a websearch. They may use the library computer to print out a paper, especially if the sharedcomputer at home is inaccessible.Information-seeking behavior: Most information activity begins with a web search. They willtype in their search within “ ” and start there to determine what they need. They might go totheir school library or if they have a history of using public libraries, go to the public library toget help from a reference librarian. They will likely IM their friends to see what they are doingto find answers to the assignment. Public library Internet use is up among teens from 36% in2000 to 54% in 2005. When they go online 74% do it from home, 17% from school and 9%other (community centers, churches, friend’s house and libraries). Note: Teens are just aslikely as adults to get news and information about current events online. More than half reportpolitical news- seeking. (Pew – Teens and Technology)Ultimate goal: They want to complete a school projectFrustrations: The books are too advanced for a high school student. There are no public librarymaterials available on a web search. The library is at the bottom of the list for research forsome high schoolers.
    • 54. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupA typical day at the library: The parent assists the teenager in using the library website. This isusually done at home, after the teenager has reviewed what is available on the Internet. Theparent is coming in after the research has begun. Once they identify the books they need theywill put them on reserve or check to see if they are available. Once there, they may decide tobrowse the young adult library collection (if they have time). Otherwise they are focused ongetting the materials for the project. Once they have the material they need, they leave. Theparent will likely have to bring other children to the library at the same time. They will be pulledin multiple directions, looking after their younger children and their teens. She wants to use thelibrary as more of a recreational facility for herself, but given her busy lifestyle, she is unable to.When she is there, the library becomes a social setting. She talks with the staff socially, andenjoys the interaction.Information-seeking behavior: The info seeking behavior of this parent is utilitarian althoughthey’d prefer it to be more recreational. They start by working with the teenager to browseavailable information from the library online at home. When they go to the library they go thereto find specific items (books, music) or to browse newspapers or journals. They may help achild to post a community notice on a bulletin board at the entrance to the Library for example,Scouts or Babysitting. At the library the adult may be responsible for signing the teenager on tothe computer equipment.Ultimate goal: The parents want their children to know how to use the library and to use the bestsources of materials to complete a project. They also may see the library as a great location topost availability to baby-sit, or to announce a community event.Frustrations: Students needing regular permission from the adult to use the computer equipment.Safety with respect to sites used. Noisy students. The parent wants to know what’s happeningin the library, but is not often notified of events they may be interested in. They wantcommunication pushed out to them in a form they find useful.
    • 55. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupA typical day at the library: Mother and children typically drive to the library. The fouryear old girl is in a reading group. The two year old attends storytelling. EachMonday they go to the library to attend the reading group and to hear a story.Afterwards they use the time to check out new books, videos or DVD’s for children,as well as to find time to look for any adult materials.Information-seeking behavior: She typically doesn’t have time to use the computerat the library. At the library she is usually busy looking after the children eitherparticipating in a reading group session, or attending a storytelling session. Sheuses the computer at home to put materials on reserve for herself or if she knowsexactly what she wants for the kids. She picks up the books, DVD’s or videos whenshe is leaving the library. She uses the library website to hear more aboutupcoming events.Ultimate goal: She wants her child to learn to read and to discover new ideas in a safe,informed setting. She wants her children to be exposed to books early on – evenwhen they don’t know how to read yet. She wants to be able to find time to meetsome of their own needs knowing their children are safe.Frustrations: Not finding librarians who can help the children to learn to read, istroubled by reduced library hours (nights and weekends), and wants to have aneasy way to know about upcoming events on the website.
    • 56. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupA typical day at the library: Will first check out which library to go by using their home computer.If they need to they will request books from other libraries to be reserved and sent to their ownlocal library. Once they receive a notification that the materials are available to be picked upthey will drive or walk to the library to pick them up.Information-seeking behavior: Often orders books online through Amazon but doesn’t alwayswant to own the book itself so uses the library to complement their own library. Extensive userof the Internet for current information. As part of a broader library network will search for thelibrary with the best set of resources for the task at hand and either request them online – or ifthey have the time, go down to the library to use them. Once at the library they will talk withthe reference librarian to ensure they are getting access to the best reference sources such asencyclopedias, journals and special collections. Likes online. Often looking for professionalinformation that is very current.Ultimate goal: Complete the research ensuring use of the most appropriate resources.Frustrations: Library not being open late at night. Inability to get really current informationavailable in an easy-to-use package. Not finding the same information on the virtual catalog asthe librarian. Not finding government information at the county and state level. Ideally wouldlike ratings and user feedback.
    • 57. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupA typical day at the library: As part of a daily or weekly routine, the senior goes to the library totake a scheduled class, participate in a program, volunteer, or just browse the shelves forpleasure. The scheduled event may be a computer class, a search class, cultural event, bookgroup or how to use the library website. Once at the library they are likely to spend a good deal oftime browsing the collections to see if there is anything new or different that catches his or herattention.Information Interests: The senior tends to be a hobbyist or heavy information seeker primarily inthe areas of health, digital photography, travel, and genealogy. Senior men tend to focus more onlifelong learning such as political, historical, or educational topics. The senior woman focuses moreon entertainment; including fiction, cooking, quilting, travel, do-it-yourself topics.Information-seeking behavior: The senior goes to the library to attend an event such as a poetryreading or art show or music recital. It may be a meeting place for a reading group. He or shemay take a class on computer use (e.g. Google It). They pick up books that they have requestedonline or from the librarian on a previous visit. They may spend up to a half day there browsing themagazines, books, CD’s and videos. They are likely a member of the Friends of the Library andwill help to run the book sales. The senior also looks for or interacts with information in a linearfashion; they search or browse for topics and content step-by-step or one thing at a time.Ultimate goal: To learn and to spend time with others and using technology to stay in touch.Frustrations: Rapid change in technology products and general resources without transitioning orguided instruction within a traditional classroom environment. Need to reach seniors who arehousebound. Not being aware of what is happening at the library.
    • 58. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupA typical day at the library: Goes to the library to use the computer. Is working on aproject that requires the Internet, as well as completing her reading with books shedoesn’t own. Is likely using the computer to print a report or to create marketingcollateral.Information-seeking behavior: Makes a specific point of going to the library tocomplete her project. She consults with a reference librarian to ensure she has agood starting place and then uses the online catalog and the Internet to source bothelectronic and hardcopy information sources. She prints out materials to work withthem. She is aware that some sources are more appropriate than others, butconsults with the librarians to ensure she has the best possible sources.Ultimate goal: Wants to complete her project by ensuring all the appropriate resourcesare used and needs to use the library computer to do so.Frustrations: Not finding all the sources she needs. Having to get off the computerwithin a particular timeframe. Inconsistencies in which library has which resources,e.g. dictionaries, inaccessible librarians i.e. not available when you need them.
    • 59. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupNEEDS FEATURES Gaps/OpportunitiesStrategic Product & ServiceConsiderations for Each Persona
    • 60. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupPERSONAS REPRESENTPEOPLE ANDBEHAVIOURSArchetypes represent demographiccohorts worthy of investigation to discoverpatterns and profiles
    • 61. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupOLA Archetypes for Consideration• Trustees• School TeacherLibrarians• Association Leadership• LIS Students• LIS Faculty• Retired Library Staff• Government Influencersand Politicians• Librarian First 7 Years• Mid-career Librarian• Senior Librarian• Non-Librarian Management• Library Clerical• Volunteers & Friends• Systems Focused Staff• Non-members• [OLA Staff]
    • 62. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupDefinitions
    • 63. ©2004 The Kennedy Group• In summary, by seeing the world through the lens ofthe customer or member, we create an:– Opportunity to increase member satisfaction andretention– Opportunity for everyone in the organization to work toachieve the same goals, efficiently, and an– Opportunity to have a clear, and achievable direction.– Opportunity to tune communication, programs,advocacy, and websites to target audiences• Pandora’s Box – Exciting but a little dangerous©The Kennedy GroupThe Future
    • 64. ©2004 The Kennedy GroupQ&AContinueDiscussion
    • 65. ©2004 The Kennedy Group65“Don’t you know whata library is for?It’s to prevent us frommaking damn foolsof ourselves.”George LockeChief Librarian 1908-1937Toronto Public Library,quoted in the Toronto Staron April 3, 1982
    • 66. ©2004 The Kennedy Group66Stephen Abram, MLSDysart & Jones416-669-4855stephen.abram@gmail.comhttp://stephenslighthouse.comhttp://www.dysartjones.comThanks

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