MOOCs & the Stanford
Libraries
Pushing the Envelope in Education
1 October 2013
Mimi Calter
Assistant University Librarian...
•MOOCs in general
•MOOCs at Stanford
•MOOCs at Stanford Libraries
• Massive
• MANY participants
• Open
• No fees to participate
• No fee-based materials
• Not limited to a campus or group
...
• Serve large numbers of students
• Accessible in underserved areas
• Low financial barriers for the student
• Metrics & n...
• Cost of creating a MOOC is high
• Issues with less didactic pedagogies
• Best for highly motivated students
• What is th...
MOOCs at Stanford
Online learning is more than MOOCs
- Programs
• Education’s Digital Future
• Brings together educators
• Stanford Online High School
• Stanford Center for Pr...
- Programs
• Faculty Seed Grants
• support design and development of
innovative online and blended courses
VPOL provides services
• Navigate relationships with platform providers
VPOL provides services
• Address IP concerns
• Content / permissions
• Ownership of pedagogy
• Course Ownership. Instructor acknowledges that under University
policy, courses taught and courseware developed at the U...
MOOCs at Stanford Libraries
Copyright Education
• Annual Copyright Reminder includes
distance learning guidelines
Copyright Education
• Not a copyright clearance center
• Faculty are responsible for clearing rights
issues on their own
•...
SUL is learning as we go
• We’re taking MOOCs
• We’re using LMS systems for training
• We’re attending the campus forums
Questions?
Moo cs   pushing the envelope
Moo cs   pushing the envelope
Moo cs   pushing the envelope
Moo cs   pushing the envelope
Moo cs   pushing the envelope
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Moo cs pushing the envelope

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  • My presentation has a pretty simple outlineI’ll start with definitions and a little history on MOOCsThat history leads nicely into a look at what Stanford University is doing in relation to MOOCsI’ll talk specifically about what is going on in Stanford Libraries, and draw a few parallels to other libraries
  • I want to take a few minutes to unpack this, because a MOOC is a very specific thing. Massive = typically tens of thousands of participantsVery low faculty to student ratioRequires innovation in pedagogySelf grading, interactive gradingComments boards are criticalReddit-like voting up and down of useful commentsOpen = strong ties to the Open Access movementThe focus on fee-free participation, while attractive, leads to challenges for developing a business modelOnline and courseware I won’t belabor
  • http://www.educause.edu/annual-conference/2012/2012/moocs-coming-revolution-sponsored-presidiohttp://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/04/education/edlife/massive-open-online-courses-are-multiplying-at-a-rapid-pace.html?pagewanted=all
  • And our admittedly unscientific assessment among our Stanford Library team is that the MOOC movement is progressing through the down slope of the oft-cited Gartner hype cycle
  • http://chronicle.com/article/MOOCs-May-Not-Be-So-Disruptive/140965/
  • This is where I have to confess that although my presentation title includes the very trendy reference to MOOCs, I really want to talk more broadly about the online learning movementBecause that’s how Stanford is looking at the tools, and there is some really interesting activity outside of the very specific MOOC spaceBy Online Learning, I mean any use of online tools to support teaching and learningThis includes MOOCsIt also includes older technologies, making recorded lectures availableIt includes online classes that aren’t exclusively openThey may include fee-based materialsOne of the most widely discussed applications that uses many of the same technologies as MOOCs is the flipped classroomLectures are recorded, and viewed online, as they are with MOOCsHowever, there is also a face to face element to the courseBecause the lectures are recorded, class time can be used for more interactive activities
  • http://news.stanford.edu/news/2012/august/online-learning-office-083012.htmlStanford has strong connections to online learning, and is very interested in exploring the potential of these tools Stanford has responsibilities to its own students, ensuring they have access to the best educational pedagogies possibleIn its most recent capital campaign expressed the desire to solve the world’s problems, and sees itself as a leader in education,Established a VPOL to coordinate research and activity at StanfordJohn Mitchell was appointed in one year ago
  • http://online.stanford.edu/aboutVPOL has fivegoals, and three focus areasGoals: Understand teaching and learning in new contexts, in order to develop tools and practicesStudy online learningDevelop new programsExplore ways to make course material available
  • http://online.stanford.edu/resources/faculty-seed-grants
  • Excerpted from Stanford University Online Course Development Agreement
  • http://library.stanford.edu/using/copyright-reminder/highlights-2013
  • http://www.sipx.com/the-sipx-solution/how-sipx-works/
  • Moo cs pushing the envelope

    1. 1. MOOCs & the Stanford Libraries Pushing the Envelope in Education 1 October 2013 Mimi Calter Assistant University Librarian & Chief of Staff Stanford University Libraries mcalter@stanford.edu
    2. 2. •MOOCs in general •MOOCs at Stanford •MOOCs at Stanford Libraries
    3. 3. • Massive • MANY participants • Open • No fees to participate • No fee-based materials • Not limited to a campus or group • Online • Over the web • Courseware
    4. 4. • Serve large numbers of students • Accessible in underserved areas • Low financial barriers for the student • Metrics & new pedagogical tools
    5. 5. • Cost of creating a MOOC is high • Issues with less didactic pedagogies • Best for highly motivated students • What is the business model?
    6. 6. MOOCs at Stanford
    7. 7. Online learning is more than MOOCs
    8. 8. - Programs • Education’s Digital Future • Brings together educators • Stanford Online High School • Stanford Center for Professional Development • Credit for online coursework • Stanford on YouTube & iTunes U
    9. 9. - Programs • Faculty Seed Grants • support design and development of innovative online and blended courses
    10. 10. VPOL provides services • Navigate relationships with platform providers
    11. 11. VPOL provides services • Address IP concerns • Content / permissions • Ownership of pedagogy
    12. 12. • Course Ownership. Instructor acknowledges that under University policy, courses taught and courseware developed at the University are property of the University. Instructor understands and agrees that the Course, including videos, lectures, assessments, slides, web pages and all accompanying materials, that he/she prepares or creates (either alone or jointly with others) in connection with the Course, shall be owned by the University, and all right, title and interest in and to the Course and all related works shall be sole property of University. The University grants Instructor a personal, non-exclusive, non-transferable license to the Course and related works for noncommercial use. Any commercialization of the Course, when appropriate, will be carried out by the University subject to written agreement of all the Instructor(s), separate from this document, and with revenue sharing consistent with University policy on the commercialization of inventions.
    13. 13. MOOCs at Stanford Libraries
    14. 14. Copyright Education • Annual Copyright Reminder includes distance learning guidelines
    15. 15. Copyright Education • Not a copyright clearance center • Faculty are responsible for clearing rights issues on their own • Partnering with SIPX • Provides an automated, integrated tool
    16. 16. SUL is learning as we go • We’re taking MOOCs • We’re using LMS systems for training • We’re attending the campus forums
    17. 17. Questions?

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