Maker kids creativemakingconf

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  • Who’s heard of the Make movement?Basically DIY with a tech slant.Started in 2005 with the publication of the first Make magazine.
  • 7 million monthly unique visitors56% male, 44% female
  • Collective community workshops known as Hackerspaces or Makerspaces enable tool and idea sharing around the world. They have grown from 124 worldwide in 2009 to over 1100 in 2012. We are one of the first kids’ Makerspaces, empowering everyone to be a Maker.
  • As you all know, enrolment in science, technology, engineering and math is declining. I believe that part of this is consumer culture. We are encouraged to treat our gadgets, our computers, our apps, our bicycles, as black boxes that just perform for us. We're not encouraged to modify, to hack, to make our own. Consume, not create.I was reading an article about a professor who asked his first year engineering class to raise their hand if they had used a drill press before
  • Hands-on shop education is being removed from the earlier grades in school. What remains is taught in a step by step fashion - follow these instructions and come up with this exact end product. I actually built a spice rack in grade 8 in school. When I took it home, it didn't fit any spice bottle or even those little cans. The shop teacher had reduced the measurements to save wood, not thinking that anyone would actually try and use it.
  • Our recipe for making a youth MakerSpace. No one MakerSpace is the same. It’s like my favourite meal of the day, brunch. Some people stick with eggs and bacon, some like a goat cheese and spinach omelet, and I like something really off the wall like the Brunch Bibimbap at my new favourite restaurant 3030. What I’m going to talk about is our recipe. Take the ingredients you want, and remix your own recipe.
  • Don't necessarily even need a space, maybe you just need a cart.  - Susan ConsidineFayetteville Free LibraryInnisfil – equipment rotating around branchesI started with a summer camp in 2010. I basically grew up building crazy things, and wanted to encourage and enable my 3 kids to do the same. So the first year was 10 kids - mine and their friends, making projects in my garage for a week. I had lots of parents and other adult volunteers to help out.
  • We started with simple tools – saws, soldering irons. More expensive tools like the 3D Printer came later. The key was real tools that kids don’t necessarily have or are allowed to use at home.
  • If they cannot use a tool, then they find another way. Originally, Zoe, was trying to create her 4 ft bow using a hand saw. After hours, she stopped and asked to be trained in using the jigsaw. By the end of that class she had overcome her fear and had created a form to shape her bow! Which of the two do you think is the most important!
  • If they cannot use a tool, then they find another way. Originally, Zoe, was trying to create her 4 ft bow using a hand saw. After hours, she stopped and asked to be trained in using the jigsaw. By the end of that class she had overcome her fear and had created a form to shape her bow! Which of the two do you think is the most important!This is a very different approach to teaching. We’re used to helping kids where they need help, and it’s hard to let them fail on their own. Emphasizing this approach with our is very important.
  • For us, it’s not enough that you have a cool idea, and someone else made it for you. It’s important that you went through the process of making it. Find the passion!Our big project that year was soap box cars with a race on the last day. The kids organized themselves into three teams, and each built a completely different car.
  • Our big project that year was soap box cars with a race on the last day. The kids organized themselves into three teams, and each built a completely different car.
  • Our big project that year was soap box cars with a race on the last day. The kids organized themselves into three teams, and each built a completely different car.
  • The girls' team made sure all four of them could fit on it at once, the seats were comfortable, and they all had a job to do - steering, brakes, navigator, etc. That thing was huge! Both boys teams wanted to go as fast as possible, at the expense of everything else - ease of steering and braking, sturdiness, etc. We had to field-repair them multiple times as they fell apart. They had a great time and learned all about the tools and how to safely use them. Being driven by their own priorities made them own their project and pushed them to succeed with it.
  • Alex, 12 year old kid, wanted to build something......adults didn't know how. He figured out how. Then re-did every single step so that he could document the process and share with others online! Be open to learning things from kids, and when it happens, share it!
  • Take 1 min: Write down 2-3 things that we could help you with. We are planning to develop curriculum along with Girls Learning Code and TIFF that could be used by other educators (eg teachers, maker programs in libraries) run a Making Makers symposium showing casing this curriculum.
  • That's a measure of success I encourage with the kids - what will make your project into the coolest thing you have ever seen?
  • That's a measure of success I encourage with the kids - what will make your project into the coolest thing you have ever seen?
  • That's a measure of success I encourage with the kids - what will make your project into the coolest thing you have ever seen?
  • Their advice? Be patient when working in a group! Lesson Learned? Make sure when you’re drilling something, you put something underneath it so you don’t drill through the table.
  • Contests are an great motivator. The Submarine Challenge – by the curiosity machine
  • Their advice? Be patient when working in a group! Lesson Learned? Make sure when you’re drilling something, you put something underneath it so you don’t drill through the table.
  • Maker kids creativemakingconf

    1. 1. Andy Forest – Chief Instigator andy@makerkids.ca @Maker_Kids www.makerkids.ca
    2. 2. NoiseBridge Hackerspace Photo: http://drenboy.com/tech/ TechShop Makerspace Photo: http://01sj.org/2010/out-of-the- garage/techshop-workshop/
    3. 3. • It’s OK to fail • Experiential Learning - Learn by doing • Choose to celebrate Making (not just what they’ve made)
    4. 4. Advice from Maker Kids for other Maker Kids “Mistakes aren’t really bad cause you can learn not to do your mistake again” - Adam, age 8 “Make a plan before you start” - Blaede, age 10 “Be patient when working in a group!” "Make sure when you’re drilling something, you put something underneath it so you don’t drill through the table.” - Amelia & Maceo, age 11 “At first when I came here, I had no idea how any of this electric stuff worked, and I’m just like, how I am going to be able to make this? But over time with my mistakes, I realized it gets easier and it comes to me and sometimes making a mistake actually teaches you something – why something doesn’t work.” - Joe, age 11 “Get one thing working well first, instead of trying too many things at the same time” - Julia, age 12
    5. 5. MakerKids' Recipe: 1. Dedicated space 2. Real Tools 3. Process over Product 4. Interest Driven 5. Kids Teaching Kids 6. Kids Teaching Us 7. Exhibition 8. Community
    6. 6. How can we help you? Making Makers symposium! What do you want included??
    7. 7. http://makerfairetoronto.com/ Saturday & Sunday September 21, 22 Wychwood Barns
    8. 8. We’re turning one! MakerKids Picnic! Make your own pizza, rockets, GIANT croquet…… Sunday August 11 2-5pm Dufferin Grove Park
    9. 9. Andy Forest – Chief Instigator andy@makerkids.ca @Maker_Kids www.makerkids.ca

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