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Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
Tw 5.2 minimalist directive
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Tw 5.2 minimalist directive

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  • 1. Directive versus Non-directiveTutoring Strategies:Can we find common ground?
    TW 5.2
  • 2.  Jeff Brooks: “Minimalist Tutoring: Making Students Do All The Work” (1991)
    What problem does he address?
    Hint (page 169)
  • 3. Brooks defines this problem:
    “… faced with students who want us to ‘fix’ their papers as well as our own desire to create ‘perfect’ documents, we often find it easier and more satisfying to take change, to muscle in on the student’s paper, red pen in hand.’ (169)
  • 4. What are the sources of this problem?
    “… faced with students who want us to ‘fix’ their papers as well as our own desire to create ‘perfect’ documents, we often find it easier and more satisfying to take change, to muscle in on the student’s paper, red pen in hand.’ (169)
  • 5. What solutions does Brooks provide?
    1.
    2.
    3.
    4.
  • 6. Brooks’s solutions #1
    Clarify our goals:
    Talk to student as individual
    Discuss strategies and principles of structure
    Draw students’ attention to their own work.
    Offer support and encouragement
  • 7. Brooks’s solutions #2
    Basic Minimalist Tutoring:
    Sit side-by-side
    Student closer to paper
    Have student read aloud
  • 8. Brooks’s solutions #3
    Advanced Minimalist Tutoring:
    Concentrate on the success in paper
    Use questions to get student to talk. For ex: “What do you mean buy this?” “Can you show me your thesis’? “What is the reason for point x before point y?
    Give student a task. Walk away. Return.
  • 9. Brooks’s solution #4
    Defensive Minimalist Tutoring
    What are the potential drawbacks of this approach?
  • 10. Important points/strategies to take away
     “We ought to encourage students to treat their own writing as texts that deserve the same kind of close attention we usually reserve for literary texts.” 170
    Strategies for encouraging student ownership and engagement:
    Questions, tasks, read aloud, seating arrangements.
    3. Others?
  • 11. Problem with Brooks?
    Limits of defensive tutoring?
    He writes: “we forget that students write to learn, not to make perfect papers” (170).
    What is potentially problematic about this point?
    3. Other problems:
  • 12. “A Critique of Pure Tutoring” Linda K Shamoon and Deborah Burns (1995)
    What do they argue?
  • 13. Their argument
    The orthodoxy of minimalist/non-directive tutoring methods limits the work of writing centers
  • 14. Where do they get their evidence?
  • 15. Their evidence
    It begins with a conflict between their experience/observations and their understanding of research/practices.
    They reflect on their experience and observations and move to research: master class in music, theories of social constructivism, academic literacy, and discourse communities.
  • 16. What do they conclude?
  • 17. Their conclusion
    Modeling, demonstration, and other directive methods are useful.
  • 18. Is their critique of minimalist tutoring accurate?
    Does Brooks leave an opening for modeling, demonstration, and other directive methods?
  • 19. Directive & Nondirective Do Overlap!
    Brooks says writing tutors can:
    Discuss strategies and principles of structure
    Brooks says tutoring can:
    give student a task, walk away, return.
  • 20. The Task
    Rutgers Plangere Writing Center Video
    Demonstrates the overlap between directive and nondirective methods.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ic4sX7T5PC4
  • 21. In class writing
    What did today’s class and the readings teach you about tutoring?
  • 22. Shamoon & Burns: Techniques
    Qualified language “sometimes.”
    How many times do they use qualified language on page 174? How do they recognize limits on page 186?
    What does this do to their argument?
    Analogy:
    “these sources” of advice for writing tutors- especially advice about minimalist tutoring- become a “bible” (174 ).
    What are the implications of this comparison?
    Evidence: Experience, Observation, Research
    How do handle references to experience/observation/research? (176, 178, 179, 181, 182, 183, 184)
    Transitions and Signposts (181,182, 183)
    How do they contribute to the flow of the paper?
  • 23. In class writing
    What did today’s class and the readings teach you about writing?

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