Teaching faculty about effective                                  use of clickers                                         ...
This presentation is copyrighted under the Creative CommonsLicenseAttribution Non-Commercial Share-AlikeThat means: Please...
Agenda  1.        The goals of our faculty professional            development  2.        What is peer instruction?  3.   ...
Introducing Me                                                           4Science Education Initiative         http://colo...
And thanks to our sponsors today…                      The Active Class is a multi-author blog that                      p...
Agenda  1.        The goals of our faculty PD  2.        What is peer instruction?  3.        How do we make an effective ...
The typical pattern… (we) Tell them how to do it (they) Try it (they) Fail or fade (we) Repeat (louder!) In physics, ...
What goes wrong?We need to help faculty develop a pedagogical strategy, and  face challenges that come up during implement...
Goals of our faculty PDWe want to help faculty to…. Recognize the benefit of using clickers  and peer instruction to prom...
Our frameworkEffective PD is….• Collaborative• Active and hands-on• Discipline-oriented• Instructor-driven• Respectful• Re...
U. Colorado clicker resources…                                                          11  Videos of    http://STEMvideos...
U. Colorado resources for giving workshops Go to STEMclickers.colorado.edu Look for “Workshop Materials”   Example ques...
Agenda  1.        The goals of our faculty PD  2.        What is peer instruction?  3.        How do we make an effective ...
What is Peer Instruction?POLL:Do you know what peer instruction is (in the context of clickers)?    A.     Yes    B.     N...
Anatomy of a clicker question                          15               Ask Question                                      ...
1. Asking Question                              16Why do it?•Students can learn byconsidering a question•Breaks up lecture...
Example question: Biology  A small acorn over time can grow into a huge  oak tree. The tree can weigh many tons. Where  do...
2. Peer Discussion                                                          18Why do it?•Students learn more deeply byteac...
3. Wrap-Up Discussion.                               19Why do it?•Student ideas are important•Instructor feedback isimport...
Peer instruction helps students learn                                   20Research shows that: Students can better answer...
Question break                                                          21                                         Ask Que...
Agenda  1.        The goals of our faculty PD  2.        What is peer instruction?  3.        How do we make an effective ...
Some research on modifications   63.5% of faculty (in physics) say they are familiar    with Peer Instruction   30% repo...
“Clickers” are really just a focal pointWe aim to help instructors: Use student-centered, interactive teaching techniques...
How we try to accomplish goals: Give a clear introduction to peer instruction. What does it    really look like?   Give ...
Key aspects of our workshops1.   Focus discussion on questioning2.   Show some examples early3.   Give explanation of clic...
#1: Focus the discussion on questioning If you start with  technology, they  focus on technology. Frame it as a  worksho...
Warm Up #1 to Focus on Questions Why do we ask questions? When might we use   questions? What is the purpose of clicker q...
When can we ask questions?                                    29       BEFORESetting up instruction                       ...
Warm Up #2: Clicker question about questions     The toughest thing about asking questions in class is…A. Writing good que...
Warm Up #3: Question goals                              31 If sufficient time, can have them discuss goals of a question ...
#2. Early in workshop: Show some examples It seems important to show examples early though  this can also be done when di...
Possible example question activity #1Gallery Walk ActivityPost questions aroundroom. Often in “trios” ofsimilar question t...
Possible example question activity #2Question Rating SheetGive a sheet with variousquestions and ask them torate them on a...
Possible example question activity #3PowerpointShow a series of questions viaPowerpoint and discuss.This has never worked ...
#3. Introduction to clickers and peer instruction Give explanation of Peer Instruction pedagogy Show them what it really...
Introduction to clickers and peer instruction Give explanation of Peer Instruction pedagogy Show video “Teachers and stud...
Introduction to clickers and peer instruction What about showing  data and research? I at least mention it, to  show thi...
Introduction to clickers and peer instruction Allow time for questions Make sure this happens early in the workshop (or ...
The Practice Question   How do you choose an authentic question to practice      peer instruction, that your audience can...
Practice question #1: Superpowers                                             41Which superpower would yourather have? The...
Practice Question #2: TwinsYour sister in law calls to say that she’s havingtwins. Which of the following is the most like...
Practice Question #3: MathA tennis racket and can of balls together costs $110.  The tennis racket alone costs $100 more t...
Practice Question #4: About Clickers   I think the toughest thing about using clickers       and peer instruction in class...
#4. Optional: Pedagogical Philosophy Didactic explanation of best-practices alone seems  preachy and shallow One option ...
Pedagogical PhilosophyCore Philosophies exerciseWhat are the underlyingprinciples that make this work?Discuss in groups, a...
Some core philosophies of mineClicker questions are an integral part of my lecture  Students learn by … teaching each oth...
#5: Challenges and Best Practices Important to address common hurdles   Chat discussion: What do you think are the main P...
3 approachesDiscuss Peer Instruction Challenges                                                         plus a practice   ...
My current approachChallenges Brainstorm           I then go through                                these three aspectsBra...
What are the challenges?POLL: Which do you think is the most common  challenge cited by teachers?A. Writing good questions...
#6: Writing Great Clicker Questions This is instructors’ first common hurdle This can be an entire workshopCreative Comm...
Didactic: Question-writing tips Move away from simple quizzes Use questions that prompt discussion Use questions that e...
Remember the instructional goals for      clickers when writing questions                                    54       BEFO...
Cognitive Depth: Bloom’s Taxonomy                      55      Do the questions you use intellectually     challenge your ...
Activity #1: Writing Clicker QuestionsWrite your own questionand workshop to improveParticipants write a questionaimed at ...
Activity #2: Writing questionsRate and SwapParticipants take their questionand rate it on Bloom’sTaxonomy (right). Swap wi...
Activity #3: Writing questionsRate existing questionWith partner, take an existingquestion and work to improveit. Rate it ...
What do you think?                                   CHAT DISCUSSION           What additional ideas, questions, or concer...
To Learn More… (this webinar can’t do it all!)                                                          60                ...
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Teaching faculty about effective clicker use

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This is an updated version of my presentation about research-based effective practices in helping faculty become thoughtful users of clickers and peer instruction.

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  • Future webinars
  • Faculty see the benefit of using clickers to encourage student discussionBut they go into the classroom and it often doesn’t work for themAnd they give up, or stop using it. In physics, over half only use for a semester.
  • Faculty see the benefit, and we give them tools and ideas, but we don’t help support them in developing an underlying pedagogical strategy, or in facing the challenges that come up in using clickers with peer instruction
  • We often stop at #1.
  • So we created clicker resources but we needed more
  • What comes first? Learning goals.
  • Instructor circulates, may need to show that you’re serious
  • Is this a problem? Unreasonable to expect adoption of any method wholesale without modification.Some modifications might increase effectiveness. But some components essential to student learning might be eliminated. Some dropped elements argued to be key to effectiveness by developers. Can’t assume faculty using PI is using as intended. Methods are related to or inspired by PI, but no longer recognizeable as PI, and so not been tested for effectiveness.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • During each section, ask people for examples of questions that they wrote that fall into this category. Give clicker booklet for responding.Point out the handout where each one is detailed more.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Shop for ideas
  • During each section, ask people for examples of questions that they wrote that fall into this category. Give clicker booklet for responding.Point out the handout where each one is detailed more.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Why question gets us thinking about questioning and why we do it. Focus on pedagogy.
  • Transcript of "Teaching faculty about effective clicker use"

    1. 1. Teaching faculty about effective use of clickers Dr. Stephanie V. Chasteen Physics Department & Science Ed. Initiative University of Colorado - Boulder Web and blog: http://sciencegeekgirl.com Email: stephanie@sciencegeekgirl.com THERE IS A POLL OPEN. Do you see it? If not, select “polling” from the dropdown menu on your toolbar. Technical Difficulties? Contact 1-866- 229-3239Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Scince Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    2. 2. This presentation is copyrighted under the Creative CommonsLicenseAttribution Non-Commercial Share-AlikeThat means: Please watch it, share it, and use it in yourpresentations. Just give us credit, don’t make money from it, and usethe same kind of license on the works that you create from it.More information about Creative Commons licenses here:http://creativecommons.org/licenses/Credit should be given to: Stephanie Chasteen and the ScienceEducation Initiative at the University of Colorado,http://colorado.edu/sei
    3. 3. Agenda 1. The goals of our faculty professional development 2. What is peer instruction? 3. How do we make an effective PD experience so instructors are more likely to use peer instruction and use it successfully? 3Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    4. 4. Introducing Me 4Science Education Initiative http://colorado.edu/SEI Applying scientific principles to improve science education – What are students learning, and which instructional approaches improve learning?Physics Education Research Group http://PER.colorado.edu One of largest PER groups in nation, studying technology, attitudes, classroom practice, & institutional change.Blogger & Consultant http://sciencegeekgirl.comCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    5. 5. And thanks to our sponsors today… The Active Class is a multi-author blog that provides a forum for educators to exchange ideas about teaching and learning with technology. Visit us at www.theactiveclass.com. Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    6. 6. Agenda 1. The goals of our faculty PD 2. What is peer instruction? 3. How do we make an effective PD experience so instructors are more likely to use peer instruction and use it successfully? 6Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    7. 7. The typical pattern… (we) Tell them how to do it (they) Try it (they) Fail or fade (we) Repeat (louder!) In physics, half of faculty only use Peer Instruction for a single semester Chat discussion: Why do you think this happens? What are your solutions?Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    8. 8. What goes wrong?We need to help faculty develop a pedagogical strategy, and face challenges that come up during implementationCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    9. 9. Goals of our faculty PDWe want to help faculty to…. Recognize the benefit of using clickers and peer instruction to promote student engagement Begin to put together a pedagogical strategy for using clickers, including thoughtful question-writing Be prepared for some common challenges and strategies to overcome them Keep using Peer Instruction over time! Technical training is separate from pedagogical trainingCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    10. 10. Our frameworkEffective PD is….• Collaborative• Active and hands-on• Discipline-oriented• Instructor-driven• Respectful• Research-based• Sustained over time
    11. 11. U. Colorado clicker resources… 11 Videos of http://STEMvideos.colorado.edu effective use of clickers 2-5 mins long Clicker http://STEMclickers.colorado.edu resource page • Instructor’s Guide • Question banks • Workshops • Literature / ArticlesCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    12. 12. U. Colorado resources for giving workshops Go to STEMclickers.colorado.edu Look for “Workshop Materials”  Example questions and handouts  Links to past workshops  Will be updated soon! See also blog.sciencegeekgirl.com Look for “Presentations”  Will have latest workshop materials and handouts You can use any of our materials with attribution!
    13. 13. Agenda 1. The goals of our faculty PD 2. What is peer instruction? 3. How do we make an effective PD experience so instructors are more likely to use peer instruction and use it successfully? 13Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    14. 14. What is Peer Instruction?POLL:Do you know what peer instruction is (in the context of clickers)? A. Yes B. No C. Maybe, not sure i.e., does this look familiar? Mazur(1996), Peer InstructionCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    15. 15. Anatomy of a clicker question 15 Ask Question (May vote…Lecture… individually) Debrief Peer Discussion Vote * See also: Peer Instruction, A User’s Manual. E. Mazur.
    16. 16. 1. Asking Question 16Why do it?•Students can learn byconsidering a question•Breaks up lecture• Learning is in theapplication of knowledge Best practices •Ask several times during lecture •Ask challenging, meaningful questions •Questioning is integral to lecture 16 Handout/worksheet / whiteboard
    17. 17. Example question: Biology A small acorn over time can grow into a huge oak tree. The tree can weigh many tons. Where does most of the mass come from as the tree grows? A)Minerals in the soil B)Organic matter in the soil C)Gases in the air D)Sunlight Common misconception leads to answers (A) and (B). Correct answer: C 17Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    18. 18. 2. Peer Discussion 18Why do it?•Students learn more deeply byteaching each other• Makes them articulate answer• Lets you see inside their heads Best Practices: •Make it clear why you’re doing this • Circulate and ask questions / model •Use questions they want to discuss •Allow enough time (2-5 mins) •Focus on reasoning in wrap-up • Show students you value their ideasCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    19. 19. 3. Wrap-Up Discussion. 19Why do it?•Student ideas are important•Instructor feedback isimportant•So students know answer andreasoning by the end Best practices: •Establish culture of respect •Don’t always show the histogram immediately • Ask multiple students to defend their answers • Emphasize reasoning: Why are wrong answers wrong and why right answer is right
    20. 20. Peer instruction helps students learn 20Research shows that: Students can better answer a similar question after talking to their peers Peer discussion + instructor explanation of question works better than either one alone Students like peer instruction Peer instruction classes outperform traditional lectures on a common test See http://STEMclickers.colorado.edu for various references
    21. 21. Question break 21 Ask Question (May vote …Lecture… individually Debrief Peer Discussion VoteCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    22. 22. Agenda 1. The goals of our faculty PD 2. What is peer instruction? 3. How do we make an effective PD experience so instructors are more likely to use peer instruction and use it successfully? BP This symbol indicates conscious attempt to use Best Practices in PD (Collaborative, Active, Respectful, Hands-on, Teacher-driven, Research-based) 22Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    23. 23. Some research on modifications  63.5% of faculty (in physics) say they are familiar with Peer Instruction  30% report that they use Peer Instruction  50% of those use Peer Instruction in the way described by developers  Often dropped are:  Student discussion Is this a problem? Use of conceptual questions  Probably.  Whole-class votingDancy & Henderson, Pedagogical practices and instructional change of faculty, Am. J. Phys., 78(10), Oct2010.Web survey of 722 physics faculty at various institutions, initial sample of 2000.
    24. 24. “Clickers” are really just a focal pointWe aim to help instructors: Use student-centered, interactive teaching techniques By the use of a tool (clickers) which makes a transition to that pedagogy easierOur talks are “how people learn”talks in disguise.  Bransford, Brown, Cocking (1999), How People LearnCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    25. 25. How we try to accomplish goals: Give a clear introduction to peer instruction. What does it really look like? Give experience in peer instruction. How does it feel as a student? As an instructor? Why does it work? The research. Respect their experience. Answer their questions/challenges, rather than being gung-ho salesman. Provide opportunity for practice and feedback. Especially in writing questions and facilitation. Practice what we preach. Do all this in a student-centered, interactive environment. Don’t lecture about how not to lecture.Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    26. 26. Key aspects of our workshops1. Focus discussion on questioning2. Show some examples early3. Give explanation of clickers and peer instruction (with a practice question and time for questions)4. Pedagogical philosophies (optional)5. Common challenges6. Writing great questions
    27. 27. #1: Focus the discussion on questioning If you start with technology, they focus on technology. Frame it as a workshop about questioning. Don’t equate the technology and the pedagogyCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    28. 28. Warm Up #1 to Focus on Questions Why do we ask questions? When might we use questions? What is the purpose of clicker questions? Warm up activity #1 Discuss in small groups, making notes in handout. Then share-out. Discuss differences/similarities between clicker questions and other types of questions.Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    29. 29. When can we ask questions? 29 BEFORESetting up instruction DURING E.g.: Developing knowledge Motivate Assess prior knowledge Application … (handout!) Elicit misconception … AFTER Relate to big picture Assessing Demonstrate success learning … Credit: Rosie Piller and Ian Beatty.
    30. 30. Warm Up #2: Clicker question about questions The toughest thing about asking questions in class is…A. Writing good questionsB. Getting students to really think about themC. Getting students to answer the questions / Nobody respondsD. The same students always respond / Not everybody respondsE. It takes too long / I have a lot of content to cover This is an example question about questions. Have others? Share in the chat!Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    31. 31. Warm Up #3: Question goals 31 If sufficient time, can have them discuss goals of a question they draft Warm up activity #3 What is the goal of your Watch a short mini question? lecture and write up one A. Setting up instruction or two questions you B. Developing knowledge could ask students to C. Assess Learning assess learning (not D. Something else multiple choice). Ian Beatty, UNC
    32. 32. #2. Early in workshop: Show some examples It seems important to show examples early though this can also be done when discussing features of good questions. This broadens their thinking from the start, and gives them some concrete examples before abstract pedagogyCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    33. 33. Possible example question activity #1Gallery Walk ActivityPost questions aroundroom. Often in “trios” ofsimilar question types.Circulate with buddy.“What would an instructorbe trying to accomplishwith such questions?”Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    34. 34. Possible example question activity #2Question Rating SheetGive a sheet with variousquestions and ask them torate them on a 4-pointscale. Discuss.This is best done afterdiscussing features of goodquestions.Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    35. 35. Possible example question activity #3PowerpointShow a series of questions viaPowerpoint and discuss.This has never worked verywell for me. The audiencetunes out after more than 3questions, and it’s hard to get awide range. Simultaneouscontrast seems to work better.Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    36. 36. #3. Introduction to clickers and peer instruction Give explanation of Peer Instruction pedagogy Show them what it really looks like Allow time for questions afterwardsChat discussion: Share any strategiesor resources you have for giving anintroduction to clickers and peerinstructionCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    37. 37. Introduction to clickers and peer instruction Give explanation of Peer Instruction pedagogy Show video “Teachers and students speak” for the skeptical audience “Anatomy of a clicker question” for the savvy audience (early poll questions help you know your audience) STEMvideos.colorado.eduCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    38. 38. Introduction to clickers and peer instruction What about showing data and research? I at least mention it, to show this isn’t just cool gimmick But faculty typically not convinced by data – use it to justify practices that make sense to them intuitivelyCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    39. 39. Introduction to clickers and peer instruction Allow time for questions Make sure this happens early in the workshop (or else these questions will be burning in their minds) Sit down to indicate that this is time for a “chat”Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    40. 40. The Practice Question  How do you choose an authentic question to practice peer instruction, that your audience can all understand, and thus see the value of discussion? Got any good practice questions? Share them in the chat!Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    41. 41. Practice question #1: Superpowers 41Which superpower would yourather have? The ability to… A. Change the mass of things B. Change the charge of things C. Change the magnetization of things D. Change the boiling point of things No one right answer encourages discussion. 41 Question: Ian Beatty, UNC Greensboro Image: Thibault fr on Wikimedia
    42. 42. Practice Question #2: TwinsYour sister in law calls to say that she’s havingtwins. Which of the following is the most likely?(Assume she’s having fraternal, not identical,twins) A)Twin boys B)Twin girls C)One girl and one boy D)All are equally likely Good question, but faculty typically don’t come to consensus, and K12 teachers have trouble 42Courtesy Derek Bruff, Vanderbilt reasoning through it.
    43. 43. Practice Question #3: MathA tennis racket and can of balls together costs $110. The tennis racket alone costs $100 more than the can of balls. How much does the can of balls alone cost?A. $5 Most people at first glance say that the balls cost $10. SilentB. $10 vote: 35% right. After discussion:C. $11 75%. (Right answer is A).D. $100E. None of these Courtesy Steven Pollock, CU-Boulder
    44. 44. Practice Question #4: About Clickers I think the toughest thing about using clickers and peer instruction in class is / will be:A. Writing good questionsB. Getting students to really think about the questionsC. Getting students to share their reasoning with the whole classD. The same students always respond in whole class discussionE. It takes too long / I have a lot of content to cover Works well, but be prepared to have a long discussion about challenges. Leads well into challenges.
    45. 45. #4. Optional: Pedagogical Philosophy Didactic explanation of best-practices alone seems preachy and shallow One option is to have an explicit discussion of the underlying pedagogical principles and philosophiesCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    46. 46. Pedagogical PhilosophyCore Philosophies exerciseWhat are the underlyingprinciples that make this work?Discuss in groups, and thenshare-out.Use these as guiding principleswhen discussing best practicesCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    47. 47. Some core philosophies of mineClicker questions are an integral part of my lecture Students learn by … teaching each other … articulating their ideasIt’s important for me to …. hear student ideas … know what my students understand I value and respect student ideasI want students to … know that I value student ideas … feel safe sharing their ideas
    48. 48. #5: Challenges and Best Practices Important to address common hurdles Chat discussion: What do you think are the main Peer Instruction sticking points for faculty?Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    49. 49. 3 approachesDiscuss Peer Instruction Challenges plus a practice opportunity1. Small GroupsWhat are the challenges they foresee? What are somesolutions? Share out.2. Pre-seeded sheetsHave common challenges written down on sheets of paper, giveone to each group. Each group discusses, brainstorms, andshare-out3. Discuss challenges associated with each aspect of PI•Writing questions / Peer discussion / Wrap-up discussion4. Role Play•Give groups a question to try teaching. Seed a “ringer” group 49to mess it up. Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    50. 50. My current approachChallenges Brainstorm I then go through these three aspectsBrainstorm in your groups the of Peer Instruction,challenges related to: discussing1. Writing/asking questions challenges together2. Student peer discussion and presenting some3. Whole class wrap-up of my best-practices4. Other as answers to those challengesWrite on the board
    51. 51. What are the challenges?POLL: Which do you think is the most common challenge cited by teachers?A. Writing good questionsB. Technical issuesC. Tough to get students to discuss questionsD. I have too much content to cover / takes too much timeE. Something elseCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    52. 52. #6: Writing Great Clicker Questions This is instructors’ first common hurdle This can be an entire workshopCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    53. 53. Didactic: Question-writing tips Move away from simple quizzes Use questions that prompt discussion Use questions that emphasize reasoning or process Use clear wording Use tempting distracters Use questions for a variety of instructional goals Use questions at a mixture of cognitive depth Ask challenging questions – don’t just test memorized facts Also provided on handout
    54. 54. Remember the instructional goals for clickers when writing questions 54 BEFORESetting up instruction DURING E.g.: Developing knowledge Motivate Assess prior knowledge Application … (handout!) Elicit misconception … AFTER Relate to big picture Assessing Demonstrate success learning … Credit: Rosie Piller and Ian Beatty.
    55. 55. Cognitive Depth: Bloom’s Taxonomy 55 Do the questions you use intellectually challenge your students or simply assess their factual knowledge? Higher order ---------------- Lower order handout
    56. 56. Activity #1: Writing Clicker QuestionsWrite your own questionand workshop to improveParticipants write a questionaimed at a particularpedagogical goal (ie., “settingup instruction”) or learninggoal (e.g., “students should beable to…”). Then swap with a This only works well inneighbor. Work to improve it. workshops focused on question writing. Otherwise, instructors don’t want to takeCreative Commons – Attribution. the time. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    57. 57. Activity #2: Writing questionsRate and SwapParticipants take their questionand rate it on Bloom’sTaxonomy (right). Swap withneighbor. Work to “Bloomifyup” the level of the question. This only works well in workshops focused on question writing. Otherwise, instructors don’t want to take the time.Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    58. 58. Activity #3: Writing questionsRate existing questionWith partner, take an existingquestion and work to improveit. Rate it on Bloom’s.“Bloomify up” the level. Tough to find questions to match all disciplines, or that is understandable by all disciplines.Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    59. 59. What do you think? CHAT DISCUSSION What additional ideas, questions, or concerns do you have about teaching effective clicker use? Do you think this will work with your faculty?Creative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
    60. 60. To Learn More… (this webinar can’t do it all!) 60 Bruff Teaching with Classroom Response Systems Watch Read Mazur Peer Instruction expert users books Duncan Clickers in the Classroom Asirvatham Clickers in Chemistry Watch our videos; http://blog.sciencegeekgirl.com get resources Contact me stephanie@sciencegeekgirl.com STEMclickers.colorado.edu Look for the session recording & future webinars at iclicker.com (user community) or our twitter stream @iclicker Handouts/slides at blog.sciencegeekgirl.comCreative Commons – Attribution. Please attribute Stephanie Chasteen / Science Education Initiative/ CU-Boulder
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