2012	  AAPT	  conference,	  Ontario,	  CA	      Authoring	  New	  Iden00es	  through	  Engagement	  in	  an	  A5er	  Schoo...
Think	  about	  this!	  •  Who	  is	  a	  good	  student	  in	  your	  school?	  	      –  Think	  of	  a	  couple	  of	  ...
Think	  about	  this!	  •  Who	  is	  a	  good	  science	  student	  in	  your	     classroom?	  	      –  Think	  of	  a	...
Think	  about	  this!	  •  How	  many	  of	  your	  students	  think	  of	     themselves	  as	  good	  science	  students...
As	  science	  teachers,	  we	  hope	  all	  our	  students	  to	  learn	  science	  meaningfully.	        What	  do	  we	...
•  Showing	  higher	  level	  of	  performance/   proficiency	  in	  standard	  achievement	  tests?	  •  Developing	  deep...
Iden0ty	  is	  a	  powerful	  construct	  for	              understanding	  student	  learning	  	  •  Science	  learning	...
We	  are	  concerned	  about:	  •  The	  on-­‐going	  underrepresenta0on	  of	  girls	  from	     non-­‐dominant	  backgro...
We	  have	  been	  studying:	  •  young	  women’s	  learning	  and	  par0cipa0on	  in	     science	  as	  they	  traverse	...
Green	  Energy	  Technology	  (GET)	  in	  the	  City	           GET	  City	  is	  a	  Lansing,	  MI-­‐based,	  year-­‐rou...
GET	  city	  provides	                                Experiences	  with	  advanced	  IT	  youth	  with:	              ski...
GET	  city	  provides	  youth	  with:	  Opportuni0es	  to	  develop	  scien0fic	  research	  skills	  and	  conceptual	  un...
GET	  city	  provides	  youth	  with:	  Job	  skills	  development	  for	  the	  growing	  IT	  market	  and	  an	  awaren...
A	  curriculum	  for	   informal	  science	   and	  IT	  educa0on	   that	  can	  be	   adapted	  for	  other	   urban	   ...
d	   w 	                   C          t g d iit g d ii                  •  ; dt uw             wg n wg                    ...
Chantelle	  in	  the	  beginning	  of	  7th	  grade	    •  Wanted	  to	  be	  a	       professional	  dancer	  or	       s...
t g d ii d t 	   n yI t 	   	   iyg                    i5                                    -­‐ I CBI d5 gdc t 	   h     ...
i P Oh 	   gI dw d dt w 5ut 0Sh I g                        I I           5           	        0                   w i0 	  ...
r h 	   g  gu          hg      g0dC h A w t 	   	   i                                g         i5 y    h Pd dt w iC 	   D ...
-­‐ t g u   ih dy t gu 	   5w dd B             ut                            	   	   r h h dt I h g                       ...
From	  Club	  to	  Home,	  Home	  to	  Club:	  using	   stories	  to	  begin	  to	  engage	  in	  scien0fic	  talk	  •  Cha...
A	  Light	  Bulb	  Audit	  at	  School	  •  “Make	  a	  Change”	  video	  •  Slowly	  changing	  the	  roles	  of	  Chante...
From	  Club	  to	  School:	  Making	  a	  ‘Real’	                Change	  at	  school	  •  Presen0ng	  a	  workshop	  to	 ...
’ I d Ni    d-­‐ t 	   c w gB     	   n N 00	   g
w g w gh G       Si                   P Nwi 	   ; dt uw                                h                O       dWI t 	   ...
t g d ii d t 	   n yI t 	   	   iyg   i5 h G uw                                            g                              ...
t g d ii d t 	   n yI t 	   	   iyg   i5 h r uw                                            g                              ...
Shi5ing	  Iden0ty	  Trajectories	  •  Mother:	  “You	  have	  no	  idea	  the	  difference	  GET	  city	     has	  made	  i...
  c   	   5i         t g d ii   th t w                                       A       h                                    ...
Future sense of                                                                                                         se...
What	  does	  Chantelle’s	  story	  tell	  us?	  •  Girls	  can	  leverage	  experiences	  from	  out	  of	  school	  in	 ...
Things	  to	  think	  about	  •  What	  it	  means	  to	  be	  a	  good	  science	  student	  in	     the	  classroom	  co...
What	  can	  we	  do	  to	  beeer	  recognize	  and	      support	  students’	  iden0ty	  work?	  •  Who	  is	  allowed	  ...
Thank	  you!	     Hosunk@u.washington.edu	  GET	  City:	  (hep://getcity.org/blog/)	                         	  
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authoring New identities through Engagement in an after School Science Club, gEt City

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An invited talk by Hosun Kang at the Winter meeting of AAPT.

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There is growing evidence that out-of-school informal science programs, such as after-school science clubs, can promote science learning (NRC, 2009). We have been studying young women’s learning and participa- tion in science as they traverse across various “science spaces,” including after-school science clubs and school science classrooms, and the impact this has on their identity development (or sense of future selves in science). Findings indicate that informal learning opportunities, when they are
both continuous and complementary to school science, play critical roles in shaping how and why girls identify with science, and the ways in which such identity work can transfer from out-of-school settings to in-school settings, in ways that positively impact their participation and learning there. In my talk I focus on these findings, and describe the mechanisms of transfer that support girls in leveraging out of school learning for success in school science.

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authoring New identities through Engagement in an after School Science Club, gEt City

  1. 1. 2012  AAPT  conference,  Ontario,  CA   Authoring  New  Iden00es  through  Engagement  in  an  A5er  School  Science  Club,   GET  City   Hosun  Kang,  University  of  Washington   Angela  Calabrese-­‐Barton,  Michigan  State  University  
  2. 2. Think  about  this!  •  Who  is  a  good  student  in  your  school?     –  Think  of  a  couple  of  people.  Why  do  you  think   they  are  good  students?  What  makes  them  as   good  students?   ?  
  3. 3. Think  about  this!  •  Who  is  a  good  science  student  in  your   classroom?     –  Think  of  a  couple  of  people.  Why  do  you  think   they  are  good  science  students?   ?  
  4. 4. Think  about  this!  •  How  many  of  your  students  think  of   themselves  as  good  science  students?    
  5. 5. As  science  teachers,  we  hope  all  our  students  to  learn  science  meaningfully.   What  do  we  mean  by  ‘learn  science   meaningfully’?  
  6. 6. •  Showing  higher  level  of  performance/ proficiency  in  standard  achievement  tests?  •  Developing  deeper  understanding  of  scien0fic   ideas?  •  Iden0fying  oneself  as  an  agent  in  the  world  of   sciences;  seeing  the  meaning  of  self(s)  in  and   with  science?  
  7. 7. Iden0ty  is  a  powerful  construct  for   understanding  student  learning    •  Science  learning  involves  mastering  systems  of   ac0vi0es  that  bear  social  and  cultural  prac0ces  of   science.  Iden0fying  oneself  as  an  agent  in  the  system   (e.g.,  science  classroom,  science  club),  and  having   others  iden0fying  a  person  as  an  agent  in  the  system   is  a  precursor  to  mastering  a  system  (Holland,  et  al.,  2001)    
  8. 8. We  are  concerned  about:  •  The  on-­‐going  underrepresenta0on  of  girls  from   non-­‐dominant  backgrounds  in  the  sciences  and   engineering  •  While  white  girls  have  “caught  up”  to  white  boys   in  school  achievement,  girls  from  other  ethnic   groups  have  not,  and  girls  from  all  groups  s0ll  opt   out  of  science-­‐related  trajectories  at  far  higher   rates,  especially  in  the  physical  sciences  (Na0onal   Academies,  2007;  NCES,  2007)  
  9. 9. We  have  been  studying:  •  young  women’s  learning  and  par0cipa0on  in   science  as  they  traverse  across  various   “science  spaces,”  including  a5er-­‐school   science  clubs  and  school  science  classrooms,   and  the  impact  this  has  on  their  iden0ty   development  (or  sense  of  future  selves  in   science)  
  10. 10. Green  Energy  Technology  (GET)  in  the  City   GET  City  is  a  Lansing,  MI-­‐based,  year-­‐round  program  for  youth  focused  on  the  science   and  engineering  of  energy  sustainability  using  advanced  informa0on  technologies.    
  11. 11. GET  city  provides   Experiences  with  advanced  IT  youth  with:   skills  (i.e.,  GIS,  data   management  and  acquisi0on   systems,  data  analysis  tools,   and  communica0on  tools)    
  12. 12. GET  city  provides  youth  with:  Opportuni0es  to  develop  scien0fic  research  skills  and  conceptual  understandings  related  to  energy  technologies,  produc0on  and  sustainability  
  13. 13. GET  city  provides  youth  with:  Job  skills  development  for  the  growing  IT  market  and  an  awareness  of  STEM  careers  
  14. 14. A  curriculum  for   informal  science   and  IT  educa0on   that  can  be   adapted  for  other   urban   communi0es  (h;p://getcity.org/blog/)  
  15. 15. d   w   C t g d iit g d ii •  ; dt uw wg n wg h h uh i c t   ih I c h t w w S dt n   dt w •  I Nh h d   wgu t wi   S   wgu h dt w c h t wh w I dh dI dt gd g I hg g I h d   n r w dt c   w i E wNi •  g   n h gu uw g g w I hg uC l N w 2 c r 5NB-­‐ n r d2 -­‐ tg u B
  16. 16. Chantelle  in  the  beginning  of  7th  grade   •  Wanted  to  be  a   professional  dancer  or   singer   •  A  0ny  and  so5-­‐spoken   girl,  quite,  rarely  got   into  trouble  at  school,   get  her  work  done  
  17. 17. t g d ii d t   n yI t     iyg i5 -­‐ I CBI d5 gdc t   h I -­‐ uw dd   t S h iI I y g B giC 5 ut d w -­‐ I d5 gdh dt g I N   gI h i t iNhgu n h i y I dw B-­‐ 5uui I d   w   5g dt t   5I 5g wdg I   g NdI t C 5dNiC 5i c h dt I N h iC h n d t B i g wg I h w h S w uw I S u   S I d   g g P   I diC I g I   n n IO I h d t   n gu c h I hg g n d t dt
  18. 18. i P Oh   gI dw d dt w 5ut 0Sh I g I I 5   0 w i0   gI t h c h h NI dt g w g u5w c   w dt d t I hFuture sense dh i dI 5id5w yg   w I yw I   5w I yg Nw 0 I P n O H of self(s) g00 I w I d h b ? I d h b ih ih h u5w c   w i N n   n gd5n 5dt   wgu h g00 I   S w0n g I N h -­‐   h 2 N0 i I dw d5wgu   h g0dC   S w0n B P   I 5 h g w/‘ ‘ /O yr C S gd Ddt uw ; dt uw h n g0dC dw d   w I w o h dNw I gdI gI   5d5w I gI   I i P O? c C I dt d uh iI h g0 C dt n I iS I h I w g g c h I h g h d w I   dt h c C   dt g n w hgu
  19. 19. r h   g gu hg g0dC h A w t     i g i5 y h Pd dt w iC   D uw O dC dt t g d   wI i   ug   wdt i5 T w   w h n gu g i   gu c h dt w N 0 gu h w Cdt ng t à  t NN w I d   I g   NN   w dC d     gdw 5d d   d5gh h h I dC   g I   n dt hgu I t h u     d g c I I w   ugh b C   dt w I I hgu u     d 0 g
  20. 20. -­‐ t g u ih dy t gu   5w dd B ut     r h h dt I h g gu gd   t h dt I dd c h g n Nh ugy-­‐ t g u ih dy t gu   5wI dd B1 ut u a gu w I h gdI d   t g u dt h w h g g I gdih d 5i I ut   w I
  21. 21. From  Club  to  Home,  Home  to  Club:  using   stories  to  begin  to  engage  in  scien0fic  talk  •  Chantelle:  My  grandmother  had  a  lot  of  incandescent  bulbs.  We  put  in  18.    •  Teacher:    What  did  you,  Mom,  or  Gramma  say  [when  you  put  in  18]?  •  Chantelle:  My  Gramma,  she  had  helped  us,  but  my  grandpa  says  ‘What   are  you  doing  to  my  light  bulbs?’  But  my  grandmother  says  ‘Sush,  she  is   doing  work.’    •  Teacher:    And  did  you  explain  why  it  was  important  to  change  light  bulbs?  •  Chantelle:  Yep!  •  Teacher:    Good,  and  you  said  what?  •  Chantelle:  I  explained  to  him  why  it  was  important  to  change  light  bulbs   because  you  was0ng  money.    •  Teacher:    And  then  he  said  what?    •  Chantelle:  Get  back  to  work  then!  
  22. 22. A  Light  Bulb  Audit  at  School  •  “Make  a  Change”  video  •  Slowly  changing  the  roles  of  Chantelle:     –  Playful  ac0ng  and  dance  choreography   –  Edi0ng  the  video   –  Opening  scene   –  “It’s  just  13  waes”  •  Expanding  access  to  science  through  dance  and   playful  ac0ng  
  23. 23. From  Club  to  School:  Making  a  ‘Real’   Change  at  school  •  Presen0ng  a  workshop  to  the  school’s  student   government  (January  in  7th  grade)  •  Presen0ng  the  same  workshop  to  her  science   class  on  Earth  Day  (April  of  7th  grade)  •  Light  bulb  green  compe00on  (May  2010)  
  24. 24. ’ I d Ni d-­‐ t   c w gB   n N 00   g
  25. 25. w g w gh G Si P Nwi   ; dt uw h O dWI t   c I dt   n n 5gh dCc td c tSi wg   5d h uw g gu
  26. 26. t g d ii d t   n yI t     iyg i5 h G uw g -­‐ I CBI d5 gdc t   h I -­‐ uw dd   t S h iI I y g B giC 5 ut d w -­‐ I d5 gdh dt g I N   gI h i t iNhgu n h i y I dw B-­‐ 5uui I d   w   5g dt t   5I 5g wdg I   g NdI t C 5dNiC 5i c h dt I N h iC h n d t B i g wg I h w h S w uw I S u   S I d   g g P   I diC I g I   n n IO I h d t   n gu c h I hg g n d t dt
  27. 27. t g d ii d t   n yI t     iyg i5 h r uw g P t w c g d d   O -­‐ i   g B t g d ii yg dt dt c h t dt d I -­‐   5 t S g   h dt -­‐ S w I d5 gdc w ih C r h wg h tI dC t g d ii B 5 I It n h n C 5 ut d wI g k c I I n w dy t w ih v B c   w w g r y gu u h g I hg
  28. 28. Shi5ing  Iden0ty  Trajectories  •  Mother:  “You  have  no  idea  the  difference  GET  city   has  made  in  my  daughters  life.  She  ran  for  student   council  this  semester  and  even  though  she  didn’t  win,   she  wrote  a  great  speech  and  handled  herself  really   well.  I  was  so  proud  of  her  and  there  is  no  way  she   would  have  done  that  if  it  wasnt  for  GET  city.  She   was  a  girl  who  didn’t  talk  unHl  she  was  4  and  then   she  hardly  spoke  at  all.  And  now  she  is  geKng  up  in   front  of  people  and  giving  speeches  and  more.”  
  29. 29.   c   5i t g d ii th t w A h g hg T Future sense of self(s) t h gu w i I yNw 0 h   gy Ah   N0? h w I dh I h g gd g w g g wuC I hg lN wd P dt uw O ; w I I h gi     g w   w I h wP w gu iC D dt uw O
  30. 30. Future sense of self(s) Figured world Space Identity work at classroom Identity work at Identity work at teaching event & energy Green Carn-val make a change expert event workshop Time Community Future self(s) in Future self(s) in Future self(s) in science science scienceScience Science School Science School SchoolClub club science club science science
  31. 31. What  does  Chantelle’s  story  tell  us?  •  Girls  can  leverage  experiences  from  out  of  school  in  order  to   refigure  the  space  of  school  science,  allowing  for  a  broader  range  of   resources,  rela0onships,  forms  of  exper0se  and  ul0mately   iden00es  to  be  legi0mized  there.  •  This  lamina0on  of  spaces  –  of  school  with  a5erschool  –  creates  a   moment  of  iden0ty  work  that  reposi0oned  Chantelle  and  her   teachers  and  peers  vis  a  vis  science  and  each  other.  New   construc0ons  of  what  it  meant  to  be  expert  were  sanc0oned  and   further  held  up  as  examples  of  the  school  mission.  •  Girls  view  possible  future  selves  in  science  when  their  iden0ty  work   is  recognized,  supported,  and  leveraged  towards  expanded   opportuni0es  for  engagement  in  science.  
  32. 32. Things  to  think  about  •  What  it  means  to  be  a  good  science  student  in   the  classroom  context  is  a  product  not  only  of   standard  achievement  but  also  of  who  one  is   allowed  to  be  through  the  norms  and  rou0nes   that  shape  classroom  life    •  Teacher  is  one  of  key  actors  who  play  cri0cal   roles  in  crea0ng  norms  and  rou0nes  that  shape   students’  life  
  33. 33. What  can  we  do  to  beeer  recognize  and   support  students’  iden0ty  work?  •  Who  is  allowed  to  be  as  a  good  (science)   student  in  our  school  or  science  classroom,   and  who  is  not?  •  How  can  we  create  flexible,  porous,  and  safe   space  where  students  can  draw  on  resources   from  other  spaces  and  try  on  new  iden00es  in   science?    
  34. 34. Thank  you!   Hosunk@u.washington.edu  GET  City:  (hep://getcity.org/blog/)    

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