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exam tips from blingmygrade.org.uk

exam tips from blingmygrade.org.uk

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  • 1. Doing brilliantly in English Language Getting the Grade
  • 2. Paper 2 Section A Poetry from other Cultures and Traditions
    • You must compare two poems related to your question – the named poem + another.
    • Focus on key words in the question and keep repeating them in every paragraph of your answer.
    • Use compare words to achieve a ‘C+’ grade.
    • PEE in every paragraph of your answer.
    • Remember to SAY A LOT ABOUT A LITTLE.
    • Your original interpretations will earn you a higher grade than learned responses.
  • 3. Key words in the question
    • Always highlight the important words in the question – pick out the key words.
    • What is the question asking you to do?
    • Use the key words throughout your answer.
    • Check that you have answered the question.
  • 4. Key words
    • Compare ‘Island Man’ with one other poem, to show HOW the poets use people to explain the conflict that can exist between and within different cultures.
    1 2 4 5 3 6
  • 5. The key to success
    You have 45 minutes for this question. It is crucial that you spend 10 minutes thinking and planning your answer.
  • 6. Brainstorm similarities and differences
    • Decide which poem will be the best to compare with the named poem in the question.
    • List the main similarities and differences, e.g.
    • meaning s/d?
    • mood s/d?
    • language devices s/d?
    • structure s/d?
    • layout s/d?
    • culture and tradition - one similarity, one difference
  • 7. Learn the check list of devices Layout Alliteration senses repetition lists Imagery Colour stanzas active verbs contrast Personification punctuation
  • 8. Language
    • Choose the most important image(s) (related to the question) in each poem.
    • ‘ Unpick’ or explain every word used in the image and the intended effect on the reader.
    • Say a lot about a little.
    This is where the most marks are because it is a challenge.
  • 9. Devices
    • Choose about 3 of the most obvious devices .
    • e.g. repetition, first person speaker, no punctuation.
    • Compare how these devices are used in the two poems.
    • Think EFFECT
  • 10. You MUST use ‘C’ words
    • Use ‘C’ words throughout your answer to show your examiner when you are comparing the two poems.
    • similarly also in the same way
    • this compares with
    • however in contrast although
    • on the other hand whereas but
    • Your examiner has to give you a
    • ‘ C+’ grade if you are comparing.
  • 11. Planning your Essay Ask for a sheet of paper. Also, On the other hand, One similarity One difference Culture and Tradition C word C word C word C word 1. Say a lot about a little 2. 3. 4. Devices Language Structure Layout Use C ompare word for C+ grade. Focus on key words in the question. Focus on key words in question. Meaning linked to question Mood Poem 2 Poem 1
  • 12. Use quotations
    • You should always use PEE
    MAKE A P OINT GIVE AN E XAMPLE E XPAND ON WHAT YOU HAVE WRITTEN AND THE POINT YOU HAVE MADE PEE
  • 13. How to use PEE and say a LOT about a LITTLE
    • Two Scavengers is set out in stanzas but the stanzas are in different lengths . The last sentence is set out in three separate sections.
    • Two Scavengers is set out in stanzas which are uneven and in different lengths. The gaps in between each stanza show the gaps in society and how people are different. Also, the last stanza is very interesting as the last sentence is set out in three separate sections at different levels. I think it looks like a step going down and this could be the bin men coming back to reality and realising that they are not like the two beautiful people in the Mercedes.
     
  • 14. Remember to explore ORIGINAL INTERPRETATIONS based on evidence from the poems.
  • 15.
    •    Write Clearly & Accurately
    Paper 2 Section B Writing to: inform, explain, describe To achieve a C+ grade you must:
  • 16.
    •    Write clearly =
    •  Punctuate correctly = use commas, use semi-colons, apostrophes and full stops.
    •    You must use paragraphs to organise your ideas and discourse markers to signpost your argument to the reader, e.g. first, next, ultimately.
    • You must entertain and interest the reader so keep checking you are focusing on the question and thinking about the reader.
    • ORIGINALITY
    To achieve a C+ grade you must:
  • 17. Exam questions
    • Write PALL on your paper to help you plan
    • Why are you writing – PURPOSE - inform or explain or describe?
    • Watch out for the AUDIENCE – who will be the reader? Children? Students? Headteachers?
    • Make sure that your LANGUAGE is right for the audience.
    • LAYOUT - your response must resemble the appropriate form – letter, article, leaflet, speech.
  • 18. PALL the question Write an article for a teenage magazine in which you explain some of pressures on young people today. You could include details of: exam pressure, peer pressure, self image and family life. P A L L
  • 19. Exam questions
    • Use the way of planning that you find easiest. It might be a list of bullet points or some kind of diagram. Put all your ideas down quickly, then cross out what you don’t like and organise the rest into the best order.
    • Who? What? Where? When? Why? and How? are questions that can help you to get ideas.
    • Respect the reader. Include all the information they need. Make it make sense.
  • 20.
    • Write an article for a teenage magazine in which you explain some of the pressures on young people today.
    • Being a teen is top! … … ISN'T IT?
    • You can’t open a newspaper or turn on the TV without hearing about ‘terrible teens’. Apparently, they don’t respect their family, their environment, their teachers, their uniform, or anyone, or anything. The only thing they respect are celebrities, and of course teens are only focused on their selfish selves!
    • Exams and families do create stress but the greatest pressure is surviving all the negative press about teens.
    • According to the shock stories in the press, we all wear hoodies and baseball caps, never move without a gang surrounding us and we are never happier than when intimidating older people or hanging around on street corners.
    • Is this the reality of teens today?
  • 21. How to succeed in writing tasks: inform and explain
    • Plan before you write. Jot down key ideas – do a quick mind map/ brainstorm/ list or some notes – this will help you organise your ideas.
    • 2. Add in detail – keep trying to show off – use the best words and language devices, e.g. anecdote, facts and figures, quote an expert, rhetorical question.
    • 3. Check paragraphs and spellings – know which words you are sometimes careless with. Look closely at these when you read through your writing.
    • 4. Remember that you won’t lose marks for crossing out mistakes.
  • 22. How to succeed in writing tasks: describe
    • Plan before you write.
    • Brainstorm nouns related to senses – what you see, hear, feel, smell, taste.
    • e.g. silence – then add an adjective to describe the noun, a verb to describe the noun’s movement and an adverb to describe the movement.
    • Deafening silence creeps cautiously through the closed shopping centre.
    • 2. Add in detail – keep trying to show off – use the best words and language devices, e.g. simile, metaphor, personification, alliteration, rhetorical question.
    • 3. Check paragraphs and spellings – know which words you are sometimes careless with. Look closely at these when you read through your writing.
    • 4. Remember that you won’t lose marks for crossing out mistakes.
  • 23. Keys to success in writing tasks
    • Vary vocabulary – don’t worry if you are not sure about the spelling, it is much more important to use posh words.
    • Vary sentence structure. Use a range of minor, simple, compound and complex sentences.
    • Use a range of accurate punctuation.
    • For a ‘C’ grade – capital letters, full stops, question and exclamation marks, inverted commas, commas, apostrophes.
    • For A/A* grade – more sophisticated punctuation – colons and semi colons, brackets, dashes.
    • Most important
    • Hook your reader’s interest in the opening sentence/paragraph.
  • 24. Finally – a Health warning
    • Each year, thousands of students fail to achieve the marks they could.
    • Don't be one of them.
    • ALWAYS CHECK YOUR WRITING BEFORE HANDING IN!
  • 25. In the exam – grabbing all of the marks you can
    • With 7 minutes to go:
    • Round off your ideas – write your last paragraph.
    • Proof read your work – quickly check paragraphs – mark new paragraphs in with // – you will get the marks for them.
    • Check commas and full stops.
    • Skim through and check you’ve used capital letters for names and titles.
  • 26. BE ORIGINAL!
    • GOOD LUCK!