HPR Powerpoint Example

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This is my HPR class' Powerpoint, uploaded as an example of how to use Slideshare.

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HPR Powerpoint Example

  1. 1. Chapter 4 Maximizing Cardiorespiratory Fitness A Wellness Way of Life Tenth Edition Robbins/Powers/Burgess © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  2. 2. Chapter 4 Objectives After reading this chapter you will be able to: 1. Explain why exercise is called “medicine”. 2. Identify benefits of cardiorespiratory fitness. 3. Define and apply the FITT prescription factors for developing physical fitness. 4. Calculate training heart rate by using the Karvonen equation. 5. Explain how to use the Rate of Perceived Exertion Scale to measure workout intensity. 6. Discuss the specific goals for the FITT and the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) of exercise guidelines. 7. Choose an aerobic activity to develop cardiorespiratory endurance (CRE). The eight activities include aerobic dance, bicycling, fitness swimming, fitness walking, indoor exercise equipment, in-line skating, jogging, water exercise/aqua aerobics. 8. Describe the guidelines for the chosen activity. 9. Describe the 10,000 steps per day wellness goal and how it can be initiated. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  3. 3. What is the “Medicine” Prescription That: • Lowers blood pressure, blood sugar, weight, cholesterol • Improves Sleep • Wards off type 2 diabetes • Improves memory, academic performance • Increases length of life • Improves fitness The catch…you will need 20-60 minutes. Answer: Exercise © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  4. 4. Cardiorespiratory Endurance and Maximal Oxygen Uptake • • • Can be measured in a laboratory on a treadmill or with a field test (see Chapter 3). © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  5. 5. Benefits of Aerobic Exercise • Cardiorespiratory – • Body Composition – lower body fat, more muscle mass • Psychological – increased self-discipline, enhanced well-being, lower stress levels, increased confidence, reduced depression, better sleep, improved memory and mental acuity, feeling of relaxation, improved mood, reduce cognitive decline and dementia © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  6. 6. Benefits of Aerobic Exercise (CONT.) • Enhanced immune system function. • Improved body composition and weight management. • Reduced risk of chronic disease (cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, Type 2 diabetes, cancer, osteoarthritis, and osteoporosis) © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  7. 7. FITT • Frequency – 3 to 5 times per week (up to 7 times per week is acceptable) • Intensity – • Time – • Type – aerobic vs. anaerobic. Aerobic is continuous and rhythmic. Choose activities you enjoy and are reasonable. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  8. 8. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  9. 9. Target Heart Rate Karvonen Equation • Target Heart Rate (THR) = MHR-RHR x intensity + RHR • Max Heart Rate (MHR) = 220-age • Resting Heart Rate (RHR) = pulse per minute at complete rest (after about 30 minutes of rest) • Intensity = 60-80% depending on desired level • Example of 20 year old with RHR of 70 at 60% intensity: • 220-20=200 (MHR), 200-70=130 (HRR) 130x.6+70=148 THR © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  10. 10. Estimated target heart rate range. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  11. 11. Pulse at carotid artery. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Photo credit: Courtesy of Gwen Robbins/Debra Powers/Sharon Burgess © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  12. 12. Pulse at the thumb side of wrist. Copyright © The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Permission required for reproduction or display. Photo credit: Courtesy of Gwen Robbins/Debra Powers/Sharon Burgess © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  13. 13. Rate of Perceived Exertion • Rate of Perceived Exertion (RPE) is sensing how hard or easy a workout feels and rating that on a scale from 1 (very easy effort) to 10 (maximal effort). • The scale was developed by Gunnar Borg. • Intensity of exercise can be measured by RPE. • To receive cardiorespiratory benefit from exercise and improve fitness, you should feel the effort is moderate to hard or 4 to 6 on the RPE chart. Younger more fit exercisers may workout up to a RPE of 7 and beyond. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  14. 14. FITT vs. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) for Americans. • Recent released Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) guidelines parallel the FITT somewhat. • DHHS primary goal is to improve health by warding off chronic disease. • FITT’s primary goal is aerobic fitness. • All are backed by scientific evidence. • All stress a longer duration of exercise if the goal is weight loss or weight maintenance. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  15. 15. 10,000 Steps: A Daily Life Goal • Goal is to increase activity levels by encouraging people to move at least 10,000 steps per day – the equivalent of about 5 miles. • Sedentary people typically take less than 5,000 steps per day. • A basic pedometer can measure the steps (with walking or most other vertical types of physical activity). • Follow the steps on Table 4-3 for guidelines to reach 10,000 steps. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  16. 16. How Can You Reach 10,000 Steps a Day? The following activities are recommended: • Aerobic dance • Basketball • Bicycling • Fitness swimming • Indoor exercise equipment • Jogging • Stair climbing • Tennis • Yoga © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  17. 17. Rx for Cardiorespiratory Fitness • 3 – 5 days per week • 60 – 80% intensity • 20 – 60 minutes • Aerobic activity © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  18. 18. Recommended Lifetime Exercise Activities • Aerobic dance and/or Step aerobics/Zumba/Boot Camp • Indoor cycling classes • Bicycling • Fitness swimming • Fitness walking • Indoor exercise equipment • In-line skating • Jogging • Water exercise © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  19. 19. Rx For Action • Walk an extra 2,000 steps. Wear a pedometer all day today. • Try a new cardio machine in the fitness gym. • Enroll in a fitness class. • Add hand weights to your walking workout. © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  20. 20. What Do You Think? • Which of the benefits of cardiorespiratory fitness are most important to you? • What is your target heart rate for 70% intensity using the Karvonen equation? • How hard do you usually exercise? Use the Rate of Perceived Exertion scale. • Which of the eight aerobic exercises outlined in this chapter would be your favorite? Do you have another aerobic exercise you enjoy that isn’t highlighted in this chapter? • Can you continue burning calories after the workout has ended? • Are barefoot jogging shoes recommended? © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.
  21. 21. Questions? © 2013 McGraw-Hill Higher Education. All rights reserved.

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