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Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi
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Engineering in K-12 Education - Linda Katehi

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  • 1. Engineering in K-12 Education<br />STEM SUMMIT<br />February 19, 2009<br />Linda Katehi, <br />University of California, Davis<br />
  • 2. Study Rationale<br />Concerns about the nation’s innovation capacity<br />Overall quality of U.S. K-12 STEM education<br />Student interest in STEM subjects<br />Size and diversity of the engineering “pipeline”<br />Unverified claims about the ability of K-12 engineering education to address these and other concerns<br />An incomplete picture of the status quo<br />How many programs, students, and teachers?<br />Trending up, down, flat?<br />Nature of these efforts?<br />Evidence for benefits?<br />How do kids learn engineering concepts and skills?<br />
  • 3. Study Goal<br />To provide carefully reasoned guidance to key stakeholders regarding the creation and implementation of K-12 engineering curricula and instructional practices, focusing especially on the connections among science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education.<br />
  • 4. Survey the K-12 engineering education “landscape”<br />Analyze the connections between engineering and the other STEM subjects<br />Review data on impacts<br />Report on the intended learning outcomes (e.g., vocational vs. pre-professional vs. general college) of the various initiatives<br />Study Objectives<br />
  • 5. Study Process<br />Two-year “consensus study”<br />Oversight committee with diverse expertise<br />Five face-to-face meetings<br />Data gathering<br />Two workshops<br />Public comment period midway through<br />Five commissioned papers<br />Detailed content analysis of 15 curricula<br />External report peer review <br />Public symposium<br />
  • 6. Findings: Scale of Effort<br />K-12 engineering education is a small but growing presence in schools<br />About 6 million K-12 students have experienced a formal K-12 engineering curriculum since the early 1990s<br />About 18,000 K-12 teachers have received professional development, almost all of it in-service<br />
  • 7. Findings: Impact<br />The most intriguing possible benefit of K-12 engineering education relates to improved student learning, achievement, and interest in mathematics and science<br />Positive effects have been demonstrated, but not universally<br />Learning gains may be greater for minorities and low-SES students<br />The design process appears to be a key influence, in part by allowing iteration, giving students personal ownership of the content, and contextualizing math and science concepts<br />More research is needed to tease out specific causal relationships<br />
  • 8. As reflected in the near absence of pre-service education and the small number of teachers who have experienced in-service PD….<br /> ……teacher preparation for K-12 engineering education is far less developed than for other STEM subjects<br />Findings: Professional Development<br />
  • 9. Findings: Diversity<br /> Lack of diversity appears to be a serious issue for K-12 engineering education<br />Uneven portrayal of women and minorities <br />Bias in certain learning activities and examples<br />Few student demographic data being collected<br />Example: Largest program, PLTW, has only 17% female students<br />
  • 10. Findings: STEM Education<br /><ul><li>Current STEM education and education policy do not reflect the natural, real-world interconnectedness of the four STEM components
  • 11. There is considerable potential value in increasing the presence of engineering in STEM education that addresses the current lack of integration in STEM teaching and learning</li></li></ul><li>Selected Recommendations<br />Recom#1<br />Define and explore the implications of “STEM literacy” <br />….Mainline vs. Pipeline….<br />
  • 12. Selected Recommendations<br />Recom#2<br /> Conduct research on how engineering design can be better connected to science inquiry and mathematical reasoning in curriculum and professional development<br />
  • 13. Recom#3<br /> Develop more impact data for existing and new K-12 engineering programs<br />Selected Recommendations<br />
  • 14. Recom#4<br />Begin a national dialog, spearheaded by ASEE, on the preparation and certification of teachers of K-12 engineering <br />Selected Recommendations<br />
  • 15. Selected Recommendations<br />Recom#5<br /> K–12 engineering curricula should be developed with special attention to features that appeal to students from diverse backgrounds <br />
  • 16. Next Steps ?<br />

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