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 Engineers have to consider natural
disasters when designing projects.
 Why do you think engineers have to
design for di...
 Flooding is the most common, costly and
deadly natural disaster in the United
States per year.
 To help minimize the ef...
 A levee is a man-made embankment built
to keep a body of water from overflowing.
 They also prevent ocean waves from
wa...
 Designing for earthquakes requires
understanding the effects they have on
buildings and soil.
 Earthquakes cause both t...
 To make buildings stronger in tension,
engineers add steel. Steel is strong in
tension and also somewhat flexible.
 The...
 Engineers try to avoid this by
using soil compaction
techniques such as dynamic
compaction.
 Dynamic compaction is used...
 Tornadoes produce extremely high
pressures and loads. Constructing
tornado-resistant buildings are very
expensive.
 Ins...
 The new Joplin Hospital is designed to
withstand a direct hit from an E5
tornado.
 The Joplin Hospital design is focuse...
 The roof will be an all-concrete structure. A concrete
slab with be glued down in which the roof system
will be built on...
 When severe weather strikes, stay
informed by listening to the radio.
 Make a disaster survival kit including:
water, a...
Designing for Disasters
Designing for Disasters
Designing for Disasters
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Designing for Disasters

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State Farm sponsored lesson: "Designing for Disasters" is a PowerPoint for primary and secondary students that discusses the different environmental disasters in which engineers have to take into consideration when building different structures. It also highlights how anyone can prepare a safety plan for disasters. Additionally, this lesson can be paired with a "Levee Building" activity.

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  • Tacoma Bridge Collapse: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XggxeuFDaDU
  • Floods 101: http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/101-videos/floods
  • Teton Dam Disaster: http://www.history.com/topics/us-states/idaho/videos/engineering-disasters-teton-dam

  • Earthquake 101: http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/101-videos/earthquake-101?source=relatedvideo
  • Soil Liquefaction In Japan: http://www.wimp.com/soilliquefaction/
  • Tornadoes: http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/kids/forces-of-nature-kids/tornadoes-101-kids/
  • EF 5 Tornado, Joplin, MO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XT7CtF5ljxY
  • New Hospital: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GFrLVzfx81A
  • Transcript of "Designing for Disasters"

    1. 1.  Engineers have to consider natural disasters when designing projects.  Why do you think engineers have to design for disasters?  Can you name some types of natural disasters engineers must design for?
    2. 2.  Flooding is the most common, costly and deadly natural disaster in the United States per year.  To help minimize the effects of flooding civil engineers design and build levees.  What is a levee?
    3. 3.  A levee is a man-made embankment built to keep a body of water from overflowing.  They also prevent ocean waves from washing into undesired areas.  Levees are constructed with compacted soil, rocks and concrete or steel.  Grass is sometimes planted on top to help minimize erosion.
    4. 4.  Designing for earthquakes requires understanding the effects they have on buildings and soil.  Earthquakes cause both tension and compression forces.  Concrete structures are not very safe during earthquakes because concrete is strong in compression but weak in tension.  How do engineers solve this problem?
    5. 5.  To make buildings stronger in tension, engineers add steel. Steel is strong in tension and also somewhat flexible.  The elasticity of steels allows the structure to flex and return to its original state.  Engineers must also consider soil liquefaction. This phenomenon occurs when soil is shaken and begins behaving like a liquid.
    6. 6.  Engineers try to avoid this by using soil compaction techniques such as dynamic compaction.  Dynamic compaction is used to increase the density of the soil by dropping a heavy weight repeated on the ground at regular spaced intervals.
    7. 7.  Tornadoes produce extremely high pressures and loads. Constructing tornado-resistant buildings are very expensive.  Instead the emphasis is placed on occupant protection and creating a hardened portion to be used as a safe room.
    8. 8.  The new Joplin Hospital is designed to withstand a direct hit from an E5 tornado.  The Joplin Hospital design is focused on strengthening three areas. One is the roof.  Can you name the other two?
    9. 9.  The roof will be an all-concrete structure. A concrete slab with be glued down in which the roof system will be built on. This way if the roof blows away, the concrete slab will still protect the building.  The siding of the hospital will be made out of pre- cast concrete. Pre-cast concrete is made in a controlled facility rather than poured at site. Due to minimum environmental impacts, pre-cast concrete is stronger.  The windows are designed to withstand 250 mph winds.
    10. 10.  When severe weather strikes, stay informed by listening to the radio.  Make a disaster survival kit including: water, a tool kit, extra clothing, blankets, a first-aid kit and nonperishable food.  Make sure your family knows where to meet.
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