Spring 2009  Eimatai  Advisor   PacketYeshiva University • 500 W. 185th Street, Suite 440 New York, NY 10033 • Phone (212)...
Schedule
Sunday, March 1, 20098:30 Tefilat Shacharit in 29th Street Synagogue9:10 Breakfast and Welcome by Aaron Steinberg9:30 Boar...
Monday, March 2, 20097:30 Boker Tov!8:15 Tefilat Shacharit (Room 100)9:00 Breakfast (Dining Room)9:45 Session II Buzz Grou...
Tuesday, March 3, 20097:45 Boker Tov8:30 Tefilat Shacharit (Room 100)9:15 Breakfast (Dining Room - Bring Bags and return k...
Buzz Group #1
Spring Conference 2009                             Buzz Group #1 Individual       By: Yael Ausubel, Gila Cohen, Dov Goldst...
Spring Conference 2009Make-A-Mensch(15 minutes)Each person gets the outline of a person on a piece of paper, and the goal ...
Spring Conference 2009Examples of Values:Charity                          Appreciation                     HappinessFreedo...
Spring Conference 2009   Dual Identities   • Do you act one way with a teacher in school and another way with your friends...
Spring Conference 2009Wrap up Game: What’s My Identity? (5 minutes)As a final activity, give each student an index card, a...
Buzz Group #2
Spring Conference 2009                 Buzz Group #2 Jewish Community   By: Shoshana Balk, Aliza Rabinovich, Sion Setton, ...
Spring Conference 2009   •   What are the different groups we associate with?   •   What does it mean to be a part of thes...
Spring Conference 2009Give each group 5 minutes to decide the 3 things they would build if they had the option.Have each g...
Spring Conference 2009synagogue Federation relations, social action, community relations and advocacy.We take action, as a...
Spring Conference 2009For the last 8 years, the Red Cross has been running a regularly scheduled blood drive inyour commun...
Spring Conference 20096. High School Green RankingThe local newspaper is ranking all of the local high schools, private an...
Spring Conference 200910. Little LeagueThe town is organizing a little baseball league for kids in the area. Observant Jew...
Buzz Group #3
Spring Conference 2009                           Buzz Group #3 Patriotism                                 Mollie, Rena, Sh...
Spring Conference 2009   • Is it possible or right to be patriotic to two countries?National AnthemFlag/National Anthem   ...
Spring Conference 2009Discussion:We will go around and hear from different people about their reactions.What they felt mor...
Spring Conference 2009Student Debate: (15 minutes)The goal of this program is to force the students to defend a position t...
SchoolInitiative Planning Sessions
Project Planning SessionsGoal: To provide participating students with a basic understanding of the science ofplanning proj...
Part 1 – Intro to Planning (30 min)Sunday 7:00pmStudents will break into school groups led by Eimatai Advisors. This progr...
5 Steps to Project Planning (7 min)The questions to start out this part of the program is:   • What are important parts of...
SMART Goal Setting                                   Specific                                   Measurable                ...
5 Steps to Project Planning1. Establish a Goal  •   The first step to determining a goal is to brainstorm, and conduct a N...
Part 2 - How to Brainstorm (20 min)Sunday 7:30pmAdvisor should ask the bold questionsNow that we learned about how to prep...
Brainstorming    ChallengeYou are part of a team of engineers that is stuck on an island in the middleof a lake:There are ...
Discussion (8 min):   • What was challenging about this activity?   • Why was it challenging?   • How did your group come ...
Part 3 - School Brainstorming (40 min)Sunday 7:50pmSchools should brainstorm about some of their needs of their schools. U...
Brainstorming   TipsSteps for BrainstormingStep One: Set the problemClearly define the problem you want solved, and lay ou...
Brainstorming   TipsBrainstorming Guidelines1. Focus on quantity: This rule is a means of enhancing divergent ideas, aimin...
Needs   Assessment What are the perceived needs of your school? What are the perceived needs of your community? What is cu...
Part 5 - Action Plan (60 min)Monday 5:00pmSchools will explore Action PlansUsing a blank Action Plan as a guide, advisors ...
Generic Action PlanGoal:    Identify exactly                      List the                       Assign the time       Cle...
Action PlanGoal: ____________________________________________________________________!      ______________________________...
Part 6 – Presentations (60 min)Monday evening and Tuesday morningSchools will explore how to make an engaging presentation...
Micro Grant Program What is it? Sometimes when planning your School Initiative, the hardest part is finding enough money t...
Advisor packet spring 2009
Advisor packet spring 2009
Advisor packet spring 2009
Advisor packet spring 2009
Advisor packet spring 2009
Advisor packet spring 2009
Advisor packet spring 2009
Advisor packet spring 2009
Advisor packet spring 2009
Advisor packet spring 2009
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Advisor packet spring 2009

  1. 1. Spring 2009 Eimatai Advisor PacketYeshiva University • 500 W. 185th Street, Suite 440 New York, NY 10033 • Phone (212) 960-5261 Fax (212)-923-3745 • eimatai@yu.edu www.eimatai.org
  2. 2. Schedule
  3. 3. Sunday, March 1, 20098:30 Tefilat Shacharit in 29th Street Synagogue9:10 Breakfast and Welcome by Aaron Steinberg9:30 Board Buses9:45 Buses Depart for Pearlstone1:30 Arrive at Pearlstone. Go straight to Lunch (bags to holding area on porch of dining room.)2:00 Tefilat Mincha (Room 100)2:20 Welcome and Rules (Room 100)2:45 Ice Breakers (Activity Center)3:30 Session 1 Buzz Group (Personal Values) (Breakout Rooms)[3:30 Faculty Session #1] (Library)4:45 Introduction to School Initiatives (Room 100)5:15 Move into rooms (Faculty give keys to students)6:00 Dinner (Dining Room)7:00 Creating School Initiatives (Activity Center and Breakout Rooms)8:30 Tefilat Arvit (Room 100)8:50 Optional Chuggim (Breakout Rooms)10:30 Layla Tov Yeshiva University • 500 W. 185th Street, Suite 440 New York, NY 10033 • Phone (212) 960-5261 Fax (212)-923-3745 • eimatai@yu.edu www.eimatai.org
  4. 4. Monday, March 2, 20097:30 Boker Tov!8:15 Tefilat Shacharit (Room 100)9:00 Breakfast (Dining Room)9:45 Session II Buzz Group (Communal Values) (Activity Center and Breakout Rooms)[9:45 Faculty Session #2] (Library)10:45 Break11:00 Jew-conomics (Activity Center)11:45 Break12:00 School Initiative Planning: Decision Time! (Activity Center and Breakout Rooms)[12:15 School pictures by group]12:45 Lunch (Dining Room)1:30 Tefilat Mincha (Room 100)1:45 Leadership and Team Challenge (Activity Center)[1:45 Faculty Session #3] (Library)2:30 Break3:45 Energy Project Guest Presentation (Room 100)5:00 School Initiative Planning: Making Action Plans (Activity Center and Breakout Rooms)6:00 Dinner (Dining Room)7:00 School Initiative Planning: Fair Presentation (Activity Center/Breakout Rooms)7:30 Skills and Experiences Round Robin (Room 100)8:45 Tefilat Arvit (Room 100)9:05 Bonfire Kumzits (Outside)11:30 Layla Tov Yeshiva University • 500 W. 185th Street, Suite 440 New York, NY 10033 • Phone (212) 960-5261 Fax (212)-923-3745 • eimatai@yu.edu www.eimatai.org
  5. 5. Tuesday, March 3, 20097:45 Boker Tov8:30 Tefilat Shacharit (Room 100)9:15 Breakfast (Dining Room - Bring Bags and return keys to faculty advisors)10:00 Session III Buzz Groups (Topics in Patriotism) (Activity Center and Breakout Rooms)11:15 Finish Preparations for School Initiatives Fair (Activity Center and Breakout Rooms)12:00 Lunch (Dining Room)12:40 School Initiative Fair (Activity Center)1:15 Conference Wrap Up (Activity Center)1:35 Tefilat Mincha and Evaluations (Room 100)2:00 Leave Pearlstone6:00 Arrive at Yeshiva University (Wilf Campus)Have a safe drive home, and make sure you stay in touch with your advisors!!! Co nta ct U s! Ei m a t a i L e ad e r sh ip De v el o pm e nt Pr oj e ct 5 0 0 W. 1 85t h S t. CJF S tor ef ro nt N e w Yo rk, NY 1 0 033 ( 21 2) 9 6 0- 526 1 ei ma t ai @ y u. ed u Yeshiva University • 500 W. 185th Street, Suite 440 New York, NY 10033 • Phone (212) 960-5261 Fax (212)-923-3745 • eimatai@yu.edu www.eimatai.org
  6. 6. Buzz Group #1
  7. 7. Spring Conference 2009 Buzz Group #1 Individual By: Yael Ausubel, Gila Cohen, Dov Goldstein, Matt Schwartz, and Uri WestrichGoal: To acquaint the group with one another, setting the tone for furthergroup discussion throughout the conference. To get the students thinking about what values motivate their decisionmaking processes as well as the origins of these values.Total Time: 55 MinutesMaterials: • Apples to Apples “Green/Value Cards” and “Red/ Create Your Own Cards” • Markers • Body Parts for Make A Mensch • 2 Raccoon Circles • Value Cards • Quote CardsProcess:NB: from our experience with the Fall Conference, some schools arrive late,and the group dynamic changes as new members arrive. Should this happen,this may be an appropriate time to run a quick icebreaker in order to introduceeveryone.TriggersApples to Apples (10-12 minutes)Each person gets five "create your own" cards. There are five "green" values cards:honesty, laziness, happiness, kindness, greed. (two are “bad” qualities, two are “good”,and one is the morally ambiguous "happiness"). The game is played like a normal gameof apples to apples only in this game each person writes their own "red cards" that theyput down for each value-- it can be anything that comes to mind when they think of thevalue. The judge chooses the card that he or she think matches the value most closely.Then everyone gets to explain the reasoning behind their cards. You may play all fiverounds, but if you wish to cut down a round or two in the interest of time, that is fine aswell. 1
  8. 8. Spring Conference 2009Make-A-Mensch(15 minutes)Each person gets the outline of a person on a piece of paper, and the goal is to create thebest person they possibly can. Each needs to choose and write the persons values, howthey spend most of their time, how they spend their money, etc.- On the left arm, write how this person would spend an extra 100 dollars.- On the right arm, write how this person would spend a free Wednesday afternoon.- On the left leg, write two words that this person’s friends would use to describe him/her.- On the right leg, write two words this person’s family would use to describe him/her.- On the torso, write this person’s role model.- On the head, write this person’s catchphrase Once everyone is finished with their own person have them split into two groupsand give each GROUP one blank “person”. Explain that now they need to create the bestperson they can as a group. They should compare each of their own Menschs, talk it out,and explain to each other why they think a certain value or activity is more importantthan the other. As a group they can only choose a certain number of activities, qualitiesetc. for their person (same number on each limb as before), so they will need to chooseand they cant just write down everyones! Have each group present their person.Brief Discussion: • How did you decide what your values are? • Are they inherent? • Did you consciously learn them? If so, from where? • Is a value something you spend most time on during the day, or something you WANT to spend most time on but aren’t practically able to? (due to time constraints, other things getting in the way, etc.) • Did you come up with mostly Jewish values or American values?Western values vs. Jewish values Game (12 minutes):Show the group a giant Venn diagram made out of two raccoon circles. Label one circleas "Western Values", and Label the other circle as "Jewish Values". In the overlappingspace between the circles label it "Shared Values".Show the students cards that have different values written on them. For each card, discusswith the students and have them decide where they think each value belongs: in the"Western Values" circle, in the "Jewish Values" circle, or in the "shared values" space(where the circles overlap).A lot of the discussion can and should ensue as you present each value. Some of thevalues listed below have suggested discussions that might enhance the conversation andparticipation. 2
  9. 9. Spring Conference 2009Examples of Values:Charity Appreciation HappinessFreedom of speech Camaraderie HonestyHonoring parents Control/Power Education/KnowledgeAchievement Conviction LeadershipSay What?Show the students a quote from a quote card, and have them determine whether the quotecame from a Jewish or a secular source. Still looking for quotes… ones rooted in bothwork really well, what does it mean that a “secular” source has Jewish roots. Forexample:“A time to gain, a time to loseA time to rend, a time to sewA time to love, a time to hateA time of peace, I swear its not too late!”From “Turn, Turn, Turn” by Pete Seeger (and made famous by The Byrds). This song islargely inspired by the Time-Poem in Qohelet, but takes a 1960’s hippie twist at the endof the verse.More quotes to follow…The following discussion questions are but a sample of questions you may or may notchoose to use. We strongly encourage each facilitator to read through the questions inadvance and to decide for themselves which ones they wish to use. Different Types of Values • Are there differences between Western values and Jewish values? • What are some differences between them? • What are some similarities? What are Jewish Values? • What constitutes a Jewish value? • Does halacha dictate what Jewish values are? • Does it come from Jewish history or Jewish Culture? Basis of Values • Choose a value that the Eimatai-ers decided is in the "Shared Values" sections: • When they exercise that value in their life, do they do it because it is a Jewish Value or as a Western Value? 3
  10. 10. Spring Conference 2009 Dual Identities • Do you act one way with a teacher in school and another way with your friends? • Do you think that is hypocritical? • Is that necessarily a bad thing if it is hypocritical? • Maybe it is ok to have a Hybrid identity (not having one consistent identity). If so, Why? • What does the phrase "Lakol Zman Vet" mean? • How might this phrase excuse or explain certain behaviors we may be less proud of? Promoting Western Values • Can you think of examples when Western society/culture is a source of positive and productive values? • Are there any examples of how we have incorporated positive Western values into our Jewish culture? • Does it pervert or corrupt our Judaism by incorporating Western values into our religious lives? Promoting Jewish Values • Can you think of examples when Jewish culture contributed in a positive way to Western society? • Is this something that has always happened, or is it unique to the 20th century? • Does it pervert or corrupt American values by bringing in ideas from religions?Wrap up discussion (8 minutes): • What is the difference between an "American Jew" and a "Jewish American" or a Canadian Jew and a Jewish Canadian? • Can we even combine these two terms in any meaningful way, or are they just placed next to each other? • Is one of the terms more important than the other? • Do they have to be balanced? • What does it mean to live as a Jew in a different country? • How do you find a balance? • Do you mix the two? Do you not mix them at all? 4
  11. 11. Spring Conference 2009Wrap up Game: What’s My Identity? (5 minutes)As a final activity, give each student an index card, and have them write on it what itmeans for them to be a Jew and an American/Canadian...? Remind the students that theywill discuss this throughout the conference, so they don’t have to have a solid opinionnow.This will be a working definition for their American and Jewish Identity.They can address how they balance the two roles, which they consider more important, ifthey think one is more important than the other?Encourage the students to carry this card around with them throughout the conferenceand refer back to it. You can ask if anyone wants to share what they wrote. 5
  12. 12. Buzz Group #2
  13. 13. Spring Conference 2009 Buzz Group #2 Jewish Community By: Shoshana Balk, Aliza Rabinovich, Sion Setton, Uri Westrich and Rena Wiesen,Goal: To understand what it means to be part of a community, and todiscuss some of the conflicts that face the Jewish Community in NA.Total Time: 55 MinutesMaterials: • Aaron’s Getting to Know Me Sheet • Blank Getting to Know Me Sheets • Community Institution Sheets • UJA Mission Statement Sheets • One Vote Tally Oak Tag • Markers • UJA Conflict Cards • Pens • Blank 5x8 index cards • One sheet with all 10 scenariosProcess:My Many Communities (13 minutes)The idea of this session is to help the students think about how they define themselves asbeing unique from other people, and what communities they associate themselves with.Explain to the group that you are going to do a little icebreaker. Tell them that they willhave up to 25 seconds to describe themselves however they want to the rest of the group.The only requirement is that they give their first name, and some other information.Hopefully the students will have described themselves in different ways. At the very least,each advisor should give some information that goes to a deeper level of who they are,and the various associations they have.Give the example sheet of Aaron’s Getting to Know Me Sheet, and then hand out theblank sheets for the students to think of many different ways they could use to definethemselves. Our Many Associations • How do we define who we are? 1
  14. 14. Spring Conference 2009 • What are the different groups we associate with? • What does it mean to be a part of these groups? • How do those associations define who we are? • Are some of those associations more important than others? First Round of Introductions • What sorts of things did people mention in the first round? • Are those the most important associations we have? • Why are those the ones everyone mentioned? Influence of Groups • Are we influenced by all of these different groups we are a part of? • Do we act differently when we are in different groups? • How can we be a part of so many communities without changing our identities to fit in each one? Geography and Religion** (IMPORTANT) • What, if anything, is special about a geographic community? • What, if anything, is special about a religious community? • Is it true that your community has an effect on how you view yourself and how the world views you? • Are some communities better to be a part of? • What attributes make those communities better?Community Building Game (12 minutes):We each articulated what makes our Jewish Community unique, and now we are going tosee what we all have in common and identify our values as a Jewish community.Break the group in two, and tell them that they are each going to have to create their ownJewish community from scratch with limited resources. • Jewish K-8 School • Jewish High School • Synagogue • Kollel • Jewish Community Center • Mikva • Pizza Shop • Bikkur Holim Center (soup kitchen, visiting elderly, etc) • Judaica/Seforim Store • Kiruv Center • Jewish Nursery School 2
  15. 15. Spring Conference 2009Give each group 5 minutes to decide the 3 things they would build if they had the option.Have each group present to the other which three items they chose, and on what basisthey made those decisions. • Did the groups come up with similar for the same resources? • Were the groups’ rationales for choosing similar, but the final decision different? • What would have happened if the two groups had to make one decision – would it have been easy? • Was it difficult trying to come to a consensus? • Were there conflicting values that different members of the group held? • How were the groups able to make a decision in the end? • Was every member of the group happy with the final choice of three? • How realistic is this game? • Do you think that real communities go through these challenges when they are growing? • Do all members of real communities have truly shared values? • How do you think your community grew the way it did with a relatively diverse Jewish population?Now that we have identified what the core values of a community are, the next activitywill question and test these values when they are faced by US society. Now that weveestablished what is important to us as Jews in our community, how do we reconcile thosevalues with the American communitys values?Model UJA Game (20 minutes):“Congratulations! You have been elected to be on the board of your state’s UJAfederation– part of the United Jewish Communities – an organization that gets thousandsof dollars from different donors to be used for many different projects, locally andglobally.”Hand out copies of the UJA mission statement:Welcome to your local Jewish community… in action.Whether people seek to enrich their Jewish lives or simply need help, our community isready. We help older adults with senior adult day care, Kosher Meals-on-Wheels orexpert long-term care. We support Jewish education at day schools, regional highschools and congregational schools, and we are training a new generation of educators.We offer counseling services, respite care and special needs education. We assist thoselooking for work or exploring new careers. We deepen connections with Jewish lifethrough educational, cultural and recreational activities. We offer resources in 3
  16. 16. Spring Conference 2009synagogue Federation relations, social action, community relations and advocacy.We take action, as a community, to help Israel during these challenging times. Throughgifts made to our Annual Campaign we support social, educational and health careprograms throughout Israel, provide meals, after school programs, medical care andother vital services. We help resettle emigrés from around the world who seek a new lifeof freedom and opportunity. And, wherever else Jews are in need — from Belarus toBuenos Aires, in a total of 60 countries — we help with social services, training,medicine, and other assistance.“Several cases have already sprung up that need immediate attention. As part of anAmerican state (and receiving some funding from the U.S. government), you feel thedesire to give money to American causes. Still, you are a Jewish federation, and of courseyou want to help out your own brothers first. Caught in this American-Jewish tension,your council needs to decide: in each instance, how will you distribute the money you aregiven?”For each case, each council (2-3 groups of 4-5 students each) will confer and decide. Thevotes will be marked or noted on a poster board. After each of the ten cases (or howevermany you choose to do), discussion should take place explaining why each group votedthe way they did.1. Conflicting RalliesA local human rights group is organizing a march on the state capitol to demand that thestate divest from companies that cooperate or benefit the Sudanese government. Youhave already been informed that three local churches will be attending, along with otherreligious groups. You have been approached to encourage the Jewish community toattend this rally.Scheduled for the same day is a visit from the secretary of state to a local University.Members of the Jewish community are interested in using this opportunity to demand thatthe US put pressure on Hamas to free Gilad Shalit. The UJA has been asked to sponsorand attend this rally.What do you do?2. Blood DriveYou have been approached by Magen David Adom, and were informed that they nowhave the resources, WHO permission, and customs permission to transport donated bloodfrom the United States to Israel. They would like to partner with you for semi-monthlyblood drives in your JCC. 4
  17. 17. Spring Conference 2009For the last 8 years, the Red Cross has been running a regularly scheduled blood drive inyour community, and many members of the Jewish community donate at this drive.Do you partner with MDA, or direct your community members to the Red Cross?3. Supporting the ArtsThe UJA has budgeted 5% of its annual expenditures to supporting the Arts. Should themoney be used only to support Jewish artists, or are all artists eligible for funding?Should preferential treatment be given to artists who explore Jewish themes regardless oftheir personal religion?Should money be spent opening a gallery in the JCC to host local Jewish artists, orshould it be sent to the city’s Art Museum to keep its exhibits up to date?4. Local Jewish soup kitchen vs. Downtown Homeless ShelterDue to the recent economic downturn, a number of members in the Jewish communityhave had difficulty providing basic necessities to their families. Considering the scale ofthis problem, there are also rising poverty and homeless rates among the generalpopulation as well.You could open up a kosher soup kitchen/pantry in a location near the JCC, andhopefully people would feel comfortable coming to get food for their families.You also know that the downtown homeless shelters are in desperate need of expansion.The increase in the number of people sleeping on the streets over the last 6 months hasbeen starkly noticeable.You can only afford to fully fund one of these programs. What do you do?5. Pardons for CriminalsU.S. President Bill Clinton is about to leave office, and has the power to pardon anyonehe wishes before he goes. A group of Jews were jailed two years ago due to involvementin some illegal business dealings. There is a member of the UJA Board who is close toPresident Clinton, and some members of the board want him to plead with the Presidentto grant these men clemency.The Board member was troubled: on one hand, these men broke the law and deserve aprison sentence. On the other hand, how can he refuse to help his fellow Jews?He has asked the board to help him make the decision. What should he do? 5
  18. 18. Spring Conference 20096. High School Green RankingThe local newspaper is ranking all of the local high schools, private and public, accordingto how environmentally friendly they are. Your neighborhood just began building thefirst Jewish high school and are faced with a dilemma:The school will look bad and rank poorly if they don’t install $10,000 in solar panels onthe roof that could generate 1/3 of the school’s overall energy- an amazing environmentaland economic coup. However, the school badly needs a Sefer Torah for prayers in themorning (the Torah itself along with increased insurance and security costs come to$10,000).The solar panels will end up saving $10,000 in electricity bills, but not for another 5years. Should the money go towards the solar panels, pushing off the Torah purchase, sothat the Jewish school is looked upon favorably, or should they buy a Sefer Torah now sothat they have proper Torah reading every week?7. Missing ChildA local girl goes missing after a school trip to Montana’s Helena State Park. The girl’schurch is holding a candlelight vigil in the center of the town at 7pm to unite and hope forher safe return. The weekly Tehillim (Psalms) group that meets at the same time is alsospecifically praying for the girl this week. Which event should the UJA endorse?8. HatzalahHatzalah is a Jewish volunteer ambulance corps. Due to limited bureaucratic limitations,their response time is often faster than the city’s 9-1-1 ambulances. Hatzalah is solelysupported by donations from within the Jewish community.While Hatzalah will respond to any call it receives, and will never ask whether the personin need of help is Jewish, the Hatzalah phone number is not posted in community-widepublications. It is distributed through phone number magnets at synagogues and the JCC.Should Hatzalah be publicizing its emergency number to the entire community, or limitits scope to the Jewish community?9. A New Community30 Jewish families are moving into a new part of town to start a Jewish community there.A new complex is being built, and that they have the opportunity to cluster themselves onone or two blocks, or to spread themselves out throughout the development.Should they move in on the same few blocks, or spread out? 6
  19. 19. Spring Conference 200910. Little LeagueThe town is organizing a little baseball league for kids in the area. Observant Jews makeup 15% of the town’s population. Should you request a separate team that consists onlyof Jewish kids, and for the team’s schedule to be such that they won’t play on Shabbat orholidays? Or is it better to promote good neighborly relations, and have the kids beintegrated into the other teams, and have to miss a few games if necessary?Discussion Questions: • Which scenario did you feel the most conflicted about, and what led you to your final decision? • What were some of the conflicting values you dealt with in making your decisions? • Do you feel that the conclusions you came to were ideal solutions? • Were your decisions purely based on your values, or did you also factor in how others would react? • Did the desire to prevent a chillul Hashem or create a Kidush Hashem affect your choices? • What do you feel are some of the responsibilities of a Jewish community, and how do these relate to the decisions you made? • How much cooperation and communication should there be between different groups of Jews (Orthodox, Conservative, Reform…) within a single community when it comes to these situations? • Would dilemmas like these ever exist for a community in Israel? • Would you consider these unique dilemmas a Jewish community outside of Israel faces to be positive, negative, or neutral? • Are the responsibilities of a Jewish community different from the responsibilities of a Christian, Muslim, or other religious community?3-2-1 Wrap-Up Exercise (10 min):Hand out pens and 5x8 index cards to each student.Instruct students to write down the following on their index card: • 3 things we discussed as a group that they found interesting. • 2 things they learned from the session. • 1 question or issue they still have regarding the session topic.Give them a few minutes to collect their thoughts and write down their responses. Havestudents share their thoughts with the group if they feel comfortable. 7
  20. 20. Buzz Group #3
  21. 21. Spring Conference 2009 Buzz Group #3 Patriotism Mollie, Rena, Shosh, AlizaGoal: For the students to react to different patriotic images, symbols, and multimediafrom American and Israeli culture. They will distinguish the images, symbols, andmultimedia to which they feel more connected. It may be for both Israeli and Americanimages but they will gain insights into the definition of patriotism and if it is possible tobe patriotic to two countries.Materials: • Patriotic music clips • Patriotic video clips • Patriotic images • Reaction paper sheet • Pens • Poster board for the advisor to write down National AnthemsNational Anthem Game: (10 minutes)The idea of this is for the students to start thinking about patriotism, how we define it,what it actually means to be patriotic.Explain to the group that you are going to do a little icebreaker. They are going to goaround the circle, and recite a national anthem (The Star Spangled Banner, Hatikvah,and Oh Canada) by heart. The trick is that they have to go in order around the circle, andeach person can only saw one word at a time. It doesn’t matter which song they recitefirst. While they are saying it, the advisor transcribes on a poster board.A student can also say “SKIP” and move on to the next student. The advisor should keeptrack of how many SKIPs there are, and see which song had the least number of SKIPs.Once they are written down, the group will sing Hatikvah and The Star Spangled Bannerand Oh Canada together.Initial Reaction • Which anthem did you know better? • Which anthem could you say in your sleep? Both? Are they equal in your memory? • When you sang it, which one did you feel more emotional towards? • Is this patriotism?Understanding Patriotism • How would you define patriotism? • Should one be patriotic for America/Canada? • Why? • Where does Israel fit into your patriotism? • Do we have as strong relationship with Israel? 1
  22. 22. Spring Conference 2009 • Is it possible or right to be patriotic to two countries?National AnthemFlag/National Anthem • What are our motives for putting up your country’s flag? • Do you feel like you should sing the national anthem at sporting events? • Is it pure pride or is it out of an obligation?The Reactions Game: (20 minutes)A multimedia presentation will be prepared of images, music clips, and video clips ofdifferent patriotic moments and symbols from American and Israeli culture. Additionally,there will be images and symbols of Jewish events.Each student will have a sheet: and only after they hear everything. They will rate eachimage or clip on how much connection they felt to it from 0-10. 10 being the mostemotionally connected.Images(on the computer at school-have to send tomorrow)Song clips: • NFL Football Theme • Yerushalayim Shel Zahav • G-d Bless America-Celine Dion • Take me out to the Ball Game • Tikva-SubliminalImages: • Israeli Soldier in Uniform • American Soldier in Uniform • Shay Doron-Israeli Basketball Player that plays for University of Maryland • Terrorist attack on the Chabad in Mumbai • Daniel Pearl-Jewish American Journalist being executed • Thanksgiving Meal • Yom Hazikaron • Yom Hashoa • Yom Haatzmaut • July 4th FireworksVideo clips: • Israeli army at Auschwitz • 9/11 clip • Inauguration • U.S Army doing something • Entebbe • Israel Day Parade • Olympics: Israeli Flag going up- when an Israeli wins a gold medal • American Flag going up • Thanksgiving Day Parade: 2
  23. 23. Spring Conference 2009Discussion:We will go around and hear from different people about their reactions.What they felt more connected to. Hopefully it will start a large debate.What did you feel the most emotion towards? • Is it OK to live in America or Canada without caring much about the country? • Does that attitude of living here because it’s comfortable strip away all patriotic sentiment towards the country?Based on your reactions: • Do you feel more of a connection to fellow citizens (Americans/Canadians), whether they Jewish or not? • Or do you feel more of a connection to any Jew around the world more than to Americans/Canadians?Specifically the American Army and 9/11 Clip/Memorial Day: • Do you feel a compelling responsibility to remember the lives of people who gave their lives for this country? • Did you mourn the loss of those who died on September 11th because it was a horrible tragedy or because you felt it was an attack on America? • When America was so patriotic in the aftermath of Sept. 11th, did you a feel a part of that patriotism and unity? • How do the reactions that we have when we hear about terrorist attacks in Israel compare to how we reacted to September 11th? • If they are different, how so? • Why do you think that is?Israel/Jewish Social Events Israel Day Parade • Does it make sense to have an Israel Day Parade down 5th Avenue in Manhattan? • Do you feel a connection to the parade? • What is your motivation for going if you go at all (school, loving Israel, etc.)? • Do you feel like you are supporting Israel as Americans or do you have a feeling of representing Israel in America? • Why do you think we have a parade like this? • Is it any different than the Puerto Rican Day Parade or the St. Patrick’s Day Parade? National Holidays Yom Ha’Atzmaut, Yom Ha’zikaron, Yom Yerushalayim, Yom Ha’Shoah • Do you feel different about celebrating these different holidays? • What different emotions do these different holidays evoke? • How does celebrating these events of Israeli/Jewish history compare to celebrating the “American” holidays? 3
  24. 24. Spring Conference 2009Student Debate: (15 minutes)The goal of this program is to force the students to defend a position they may notpersonally hold, and to understand the various aspects of certain debated topics. Twotopics are presented below, and the advisor can decide whether to engage the students inone, the other or both.Split the group in two, and assign each smaller group to one of the sides of the debate.They will have 5 minutes to prepare their arguments, and then they will have to send atleast one representative to debate with the other group.The advisors should spend a minute or two in each group to make sure they are thinkingabout as many of the different perspectives as possible.Topic #1: American Army vs. Israeli ArmyThe group is debating what type of army service an 18-year-old American should enlistin. The options are either the American army or the Israeli army.Here are some possible questions for a quick post-debate discussion: • Is there a responsibility for American Jews to join the American army? • Is there a responsibility for American Jews to join the Israeli army? • If our answers are different for each question, why is that? • What does that say about our priorities? • Is that wrong?Topic #2: American Aid to IsraelThe group is debating whether the Jewish community should be in favor of the Americangovernment sending Israel $3Billion a year in military aid. One side will be pro and oneside will be con.Here are some possible questions for a quick post-debate discussion: • Why does the US give Israel so much foreign Aid? • Should America treat Israel differently? • Is Israel only gaining from this money? Are there any downsides? 4
  25. 25. SchoolInitiative Planning Sessions
  26. 26. Project Planning SessionsGoal: To provide participating students with a basic understanding of the science ofplanning projects, and some strategies for planning effectively.Goal Objectives: 1. Teach effective planning. 2. Practice brainstorming and creative thinking. 3. Conduct a needs assessment. 4. Create an Action Plan 5. Design a programSupplies Needed: • Flipchart • Markers • Handouts (Five Steps to Planning, Brainstorming Challenge, Brainstorming Tips, Needs Assessment, Action Plans, • Scratch paperFive Part Program: • Part 1- Intro to Planning - 30 min • Part 2- Brainstorming – 60 min • Part 3- Choosing an Idea - 45 min • Part 4- Action Plan - 60 min • Part 5- Presentation Creation - 60 min 1
  27. 27. Part 1 – Intro to Planning (30 min)Sunday 7:00pmStudents will break into school groups led by Eimatai Advisors. This program will takeplace in school groups.Number Counting Trigger (15 min)This activity is designed to get the students thinking about the importance of planning.Start out by telling the students that no talking will be allowed during this first activityexcept for numbers. They should stop talking right now.Tell the students that they are going to have to figure out how to coordinate themselves toaccomplish a task. Their task is as follows: The students must collectively count aloud from 1-15 without the same person saying two consecutive numbers, and without any two people speaking at the same time. If they do either of these things, they must start again at the beginning. NO non-counting TALKING!Give them a few minutes to try accomplishing the task. It should be difficult if they jumpright into it, but it’s also possible that with a few hand gestures they could get it veryquickly. Each group will be different. (If you want to make it harder, you can say thatpeople cannot say a number after a person they are sitting next to.)If they were not able to get it the first time, have them try again, but give them 30seconds to talk before they try. It should be a lot easier this time. • Why was this task easier when you could talk about it before? • What exactly is the point of planning? • What can happen when you don’t plan ahead? • What if the task had been much more difficult? Would you have even had a chance without planning? • What did you do to plan? 2
  28. 28. 5 Steps to Project Planning (7 min)The questions to start out this part of the program is: • What are important parts of planning a project? • What do we need to be thinking about to even start this process? • Has anyone had experience with project planning that they want to share with the group? • What did they learn from those experiences?Advisors should hand out the sheets, and ask some of the questions below as you gothrough the sheet. • Which part of planning will be the hardest? The easiest? • Are any steps missing from the handout?SMART Goal Setting (8 min)If they have not already, have the students turn their sheets over to the back side, and goover the steps to SMART goal setting. • What are some other examples of Specific/Measurable/Attainable/Relevant/Time- Bound goals? • Can we see these principles fitting into our lives in other ways? • Why is it so important to follow these five principles? • What would happen if our goal were not SMART? • Are there any other criteria we should come up with before we start thinking about our goals? 3
  29. 29. SMART Goal Setting Specific Measurable Attainable Relevant Time-boundSpecificIs your goal well defined? Avoid setting unclear or vague objectives; instead be asprecise as possible.Instead of: To do well in my exams…Make it specific: To increase study time to 30hrs per week and attend all scheduledrevision sessionsMeasurableBe clear how will you know when you have achieved your goal. Using numbers, datesand times is one way to represent clear objectives.Instead of: To get better grades…Make it measurable: achieve a one-grade improvement in next 2 assignments.AttainableSetting impossible goals for your team will only end in disappointment. Make goalschallenging, but realistic.Instead of: Catch up on this years backlog of reading during vacation…Make it attainable: Allocate 4 hours a week in vacation to do reading.RelevantTry and step back and get an overview of all the different stakeholders your areresponsible to: School, community, peers, etc. Consider how relevant each objective is tothe overall picture.Time-boundSet a time scale for completion of each goal. Even if you have to revise this as youprogress, it will help to keep you motivated.Instead of: Find out about work abroad for vacation…Make it time-bound: By end of Easter holidays compile CV and identify 4 possiblevacation opportunities using resources at the careers centre or on the web.
  30. 30. 5 Steps to Project Planning1. Establish a Goal • The first step to determining a goal is to brainstorm, and conduct a Needs Assessment for your school/community. • Use the SMART Goal Setting model on the back of this sheet to make sure your project’s goal is on target.2. Project Deliverables • Project deliverables are the actual things you will do or create in order to accomplish your goal. They are the means through which you will reach your goal. • Break the deliverables up into the various steps it will take to complete them. “Run a fundraiser” should consist of no less than 15 steps. • Make sure you determine who will be responsible for each of the deliverables, and how they are going to accomplish it. Do not assign people to tasks that they won’t be able to complete.3. Establish a Time Table • Once you have all of your deliverables, the steps, and the people responsible for them, it’s time to figure out when you plan on conducting the project. • Set realistic dates, and record them on an Action Plan. Having a sheet of paper that everyone has access to will create accountability and increase organization.4. Share your Idea • Once you have a clearly defined plan, share your idea with the relevant stakeholders. Be sure that you can quickly and clearly explain to someone what you plan on doing. • Create visuals that can be placed in a physical location, or converted into fliers, that will help transmit your message even when you’re not there.5. Make it Happen • Now all you have to do is follow your plan. Keep your goal in mind, follow your action plan, keep on s schedule, and spread your message. • If you run into stumbling blocks, it’s OK. Make adjustments to your schedule and/or deliverables, and keep going. • Most importantly, HAVE FUN!
  31. 31. Part 2 - How to Brainstorm (20 min)Sunday 7:30pmAdvisor should ask the bold questionsNow that we learned about how to prepare the logistics of a project, how do youcome up with a creative project idea? • What is brainstorming? • Why do we brainstorm? • How do we brainstorm?Brainstorming is an activity used to generate many creative ideas that have no right orwrong answers and are accepted without criticismBrainstorming Challenge - (12 min)Split group by schools and pose the following challenge:You are part of a team of engineers that is stuck on an island in the middle of a lake.There are 5 members of your team. You have run out of food, and everyone must get offthe island. In 10 minutes how many ways can your team think of to get off the island andmake it to the shore? The island is 1000 ft from shore.You only have the following supplies: • 500 ft. of rope • A 10 ft long canoe that holds only 2 people and contains 2 paddles • An abandoned school bus. The bus is broken and cannot be fixed, but can be taken apart • 5 trees, each tree is 50 ft tall and only 2 ft wideYou get 1 point for any solution, 5 points for a solution that the other team does not have.Creativity Counts!Give the students 10 minutes to do the activity, and then facilitate the followingdiscussion with them: 4
  32. 32. Brainstorming ChallengeYou are part of a team of engineers that is stuck on an island in the middleof a lake:There are 5 members of your team. You have run out of food, and everyonemust get off the island. In 10 minutes how many ways can you brainstormfor your team to get off the island and make it to the shore?You only have the following supplies:- 500 ft of Rope- A 10 ft long canoe that holds only 2 people and contains 2 paddles- An abandoned School Bus. The School Bus is broken and cannot be fixed, but can be taken apart- 5 Trees. Each Tree is 50 ft tall and only 2 ft wideOne point will be awarded for every solution. 5 points for a solution that theother team does not have. Be creative! Yeshiva University
  33. 33. Discussion (8 min): • What was challenging about this activity? • Why was it challenging? • How did your group come up with solutions to escape the island? • What do you think would have made this challenge easier? • What are some practical tips for brainstorming that we can learn from this activity?You can review the following brainstorming tips with the group following theactivity: o Define the problem you want solved clearly, and lay out any criteria to be met o Keep the session focused on the problem o Ensure that no one criticizes or evaluates ideas during the session. Criticism introduces an element of risk for group members when putting forward an idea. This stifles creativity and cripples the free running nature of a good brainstorming session o Encourage an enthusiastic, uncritical attitude among members of the group. Try to get everyone to contribute and develop ideas, including the quietest members of the group o Let people have fun brainstorming. Encourage them to come up with as many ideas as possible, from solidly practical ones to wildly impractical ones. Encourage creativity! o Ensure that no one train of thought is followed for too long. o Encourage students to develop each other’s ideas, or to use those ideas to create new ones. o Appoint one person to jot down ideas that come out of the session. The chart should be reviewed and evaluated after the session.Now that we have learned about brainstorming, we are ready to brainstorm someideas addressing a few of the different areas of need in our schools 5
  34. 34. Part 3 - School Brainstorming (40 min)Sunday 7:50pmSchools should brainstorm about some of their needs of their schools. Use the tips andskills they learned from the brainstorming activity to enhance their brainstorming ofactivities they can run in their school.Advisors should hand out the Needs Assessment handout. Encourage the students to usethe strategies for brainstorming you just reviewed.FIRST – Brainstorm the goal of the program (the cause you want to support)SECOND – Brainstorm the methods to fulfill the goal (bake sale, school assembly, etc.) • Get as many ideas listed as possible. • Make sure everyone is involved and has the opportunity to say what they think. • THERE ARE NO BAD IDEAS DURING BRAINSTORMINGPart 4 - Choosing an Idea (45 min)Monday 12:00pmSchools should work together to figure out which project idea they would like to follow-through to completion.It’s not always easy to come to a consensus, so recognize that sometimes there will bepeople unhappy with the choice that is made. There will need to be compromise, andstudents should figure out what idea is best for the group, not which one they thought of.Criteria to consider when choosing an Idea: • Which is the most practical idea? • Which is the group most passionate about? • Which idea fills the greatest need? • Which idea will get administrative/communal support? 6
  35. 35. Brainstorming TipsSteps for BrainstormingStep One: Set the problemClearly define the problem you want solved, and lay out any criteria to be met.One of the most important things to do before a session is to define the problem. The problem must be clear, nottoo big, and captured in a definite question. If the problem is too big, divide it into smaller components, each withits own question.Step Two: Ask for IdeasBefore trying any fancy tricks, just ask the group if they have any ideas. Make sure to emphasize that there are nobad ideas, and encourage people to build off of one another. The goal here is quantity; get as many ideas out as youcan.*Make sure you record all ideas so you can evaluate them later on!Step Three: Utilize Brainstorming TechniquesIf no ideas are coming out, or your group has hit a wall, try using one of the various brainstorming techniques onthe other side of this sheet. They are designed to evoke creative ideas in a bunch of different ways.Step Four: Organize and Evaluate IdeasWhen you feel that you have generated as many ideas as possible, you are now ready to analyze the ideas and deter-mine which have the most potential. You can have an open discussion, you can have people vote on the best ideas,or you can try to group ideas into categories. Now is that time to identify the pros and cons of each idea, and tryto pick the best ones. One strategy is to first cut out any ideas which may be duplicates or obviously unfeasible.Sometimes the best idea can be a combination of two lesser ideas.Step Five: Identify the Best IdeasYou should be ready to decide on 1- ideas which are the best solutions to your problem. Take those ideas, review 3them with the group, and try to flesh them out as much as possible. Keep in mind that you will most likely have tochoose only one of these ideas, so don’t get too attached. Yeshiva University
  36. 36. Brainstorming TipsBrainstorming Guidelines1. Focus on quantity: This rule is a means of enhancing divergent ideas, aiming to facilitate problem solving throughthe belief that quantity breeds quality. The assumption is that the greater the number of ideas generated, the greaterthe chance of producing a radical and effective solution.2. No criticism: It must be emphasized that during group brainstorming, criticism should be put on hold. Instead ofimmediately stating what might be wrong with an idea, the participants should focus on extending or adding to it,reserving criticism for a later critical stage of the process. By suspending judgment, one creates a supportive atmos-phere where participants feel free to generate atypical ideas.3. Unusual ideas are welcome: To get a good and long list of ideas, unusual ideas are welcomed. They may opennew ways of thinking and provide better solutions than regular ideas. Looking from another perspective or settingaside assumptions can generate uncommon ideas.4. Combine and improve ideas: Good ideas can be combined to form a single very good idea, as suggested by theslogan "1+1=3". This approach is assumed to lead to better and more complete ideas than merely generating newideas alone. It is believed to stimulate the building of ideas by a process of association.Brainstorming TechniquesGroup Passing Technique:Each person in a group writes down one idea on a piece of paper, and then passes the paper to the next person in a clockwise direction,who adds some thoughts, comments, and/or concerns about the idea. Each person gets 30 seconds with each sheet. This is repeated untileverybody gets his/her original paper back. By this time, it is likely that the group will have extensively elaborated on each idea.The Nominal Group Technique:Participants are asked to write down their ideas anonymously on index cards. The moderator collects the ideas, and each is voted on by thegroup. The vote can be as simple as a show of hands in favor of a given idea. This process is called distillation.After distillation, the top ranked ideas may be sent back to the group or to subgroups for further brainstorming. Each group will come backto the whole group for ranking the listed ideas. Sometimes ideas that were previously dropped may be brought forward again once thegroup has re-evaluated the ideas.Team Idea Mapping Technique:This method of brainstorming works by the method of association. It may improve collaboration and increase the quantity of ideas, and isdesigned so that all attendees participate and no ideas are rejected.Each participant creates an individual brainstorm of ideas on a sheet of paper. After 5 minutes, all ideas are then merged onto one largeposter. During this consolidation phase, the participants may discover a common understanding of the issues as they share the meaningsbehind their ideas. As the sharing takes place, new ideas may arise by association. Those ideas are added to the poster as well. Once all theideas are captured, the group can prioritize and/or pick a direction.Paired Brainstorming:Divide participants into pairs. Have each person offer a rapid-fire idea. Have them keep giving ideas back and forth, even if they get offtrack, until neither can think of anything further. Have the pairs come back to report to the larger group. Yeshiva University
  37. 37. Needs Assessment What are the perceived needs of your school? What are the perceived needs of your community? What is currently being done to attend to those needs? What can be done to improve those efforts? Prioritize the most important need at this time. Explain why you chose that need: Yeshiva University
  38. 38. Part 5 - Action Plan (60 min)Monday 5:00pmSchools will explore Action PlansUsing a blank Action Plan as a guide, advisors should ask the bold questions. • What is an Action Plan? o A detailed list that says what needs to be done, who will do it, and by when it must be done. • Why is it important to have a thorough Action Plan o In order for every aspect of your program to run smoothly and successfully you need to create a thorough Action Plan. If you are missing things on the report, then most likely you will forget to do it for the program and something will go wrong. • What does the Action Plan incorporate? o It incorporates timeline, goal, and delegation. ! You need a timeline. For the timeline, work backwards from the event. Make sure that you finish all of the preparation at least two weeks before the program is to take place. ! You must always have a Goal for any program that you run. Make sure to list it at the beginning of brainstorming and put it as the header on your action report so that you will always be aware of your objective. This way your program will never stray too far from your overall goal. Programs have a lot of facets. ! The only way to accomplish everything is to have proper delegation. Make sure that someone in charge gives out tasks to people who have the time and skills to handle them. Assess the people for yourself and assign them accordingly rather than relying on what they tell you that they can do. Your school group should now begin to work on an appropriate Action Plan for their project. Make sure that the Action Plan is realistic. It is the key to success for the program 7
  39. 39. Generic Action PlanGoal: Identify exactly List the Assign the time Clearly delegate what the goal and different items and frame or the exact the individual that purpose of your tasks that must be date when the will be performing project or event completed by the “Who” does the the “What” “Who” “What What When Who 1 Find a location 10 weeks before 2 Explain the program to the people in charge 10 weeks before 3 Discuss programming needs 10 weeks before 4 Create application 8 weeks before 5 Invite Staff 8 weeks before 6 Write preliminary schedule for event 6 weeks before 7 Shop for Transportation 6 weeks before 8 Shop for caterers 6 weeks before 9 Find entertainment 4 weeks before 10 Inform caterer of event 4 weeks before 11 Book rooms at location 4 weeks before 12 Hire tech staff 4 weeks before 13 Confirm transportation 4 weeks before 14 Buy Materials needed 4 weeks before 15 Confirm quantity of materials needed 2 weeks before 16 Close applications for the event 10 days before 17 Finalize all transportation 5 days before 18 Finalize the order of food from caterer 5 days before 19 Assign staff roles (circles, Davening, etc) 5 days before 20 Copy program/schedule 3 days before 21 Finalize list of participants 2 days before 22 Decorate the venue 1 day before 23 Hang up signs/lists Day of event 24 Send thank you letters 3 days after
  40. 40. Action PlanGoal: ____________________________________________________________________! ____________________________________________________________________ What When Who 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25
  41. 41. Part 6 – Presentations (60 min)Monday evening and Tuesday morningSchools will explore how to make an engaging presentationWhat are some different ways we can make a presentation? • Elevator Pitch • PowerPoint • Flyer • Skit • Billboard • SongEach school group MUST prepare the following: • 30 second elevator pitch- This will be used during the School Initiative Fair o An elevator pitch (or elevator speech) is a brief overview of an idea for a product, service, or project. The pitch is so called because it can be delivered in the time span of an elevator ride (say, thirty seconds or 100- 150 words). o Every Elevator Pitch contains: ! A "hook". Open your pitch by getting the Investors attention with a "hook." A statement or question that piques their interest to want to hear more. ! About 150-225 words. Your pitch should go no longer than 60 seconds. ! Passion. ! A request. At the end of your pitch, you must ask for something. Do you want their business card, to schedule a full presentation, to ask for a referral? • Poster Board Tri-Fold o Using a tri-fold poster board schools will create a catchy looking billboard to be used during the School Initiative Fair. o Poster board MUST include the Action Plan. • Three minute presentation for the Fair o Exactly what this consists of is completely up to your school group. It can be a jingle, a story, or even just an explanation of the project.Now the schools should work on their presentations together to make sure they are readyfor the school initiative fair on Tuesday. 8
  42. 42. Micro Grant Program What is it? Sometimes when planning your School Initiative, the hardest part is finding enough money to get your project started. Other times your program is very low-cost, and you are trying to find out how to publicize better. The Eimatai Micro Grant program is designed to provide you with a structure to get the resources you need. How does it work? There are a number of stages that you will go through as you create a successful School Initiative. As you complete these stages (and report the completion to your Eimatai advisor), money will be deposited in your school’s Eimatai account. Once your balance reaches $250, you can submit a budget for how you want to spend the money. Once that budget is approved, you will be able to withdraw from your account to pay for your program’s expenses. Stage Value Description On the Eimatai Conference, students will learn about Action Plans, and Action Plan $50 how to plan a program. Each school group should create and Action Plan for their School Initiative. Towards the end of the conference, each school group will make a Eimatai Presentation $50 presentation in buzz groups, and a billboard for the School Initiative Fair. Meet with Eimatai Following the Eimatai Conference, school groups should contact their $50 Eimatai advisor, and conduct one conference call, start an email chain, Advisor and schedule time to meet in person. Presentation to A presentation should be made to relevant school administration $50 about the School Initiative. It should include the action plan, and any administration relevant program budget. Each school group is expected to write a 250 word article describing Newspaper Article $50 what their School Initiative will be. This article can be used in school and local newspapers. Yeshiva University

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