Workshop innovits   i tutor  entrepreneurs   2013 mizio
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Workshop innovits i tutor entrepreneurs 2013 mizio

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Jobs to be done, lean startup , how to manage experiments, strategy and business models

Jobs to be done, lean startup , how to manage experiments, strategy and business models

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Workshop innovits   i tutor  entrepreneurs   2013 mizio Workshop innovits i tutor entrepreneurs 2013 mizio Presentation Transcript

  • Innovits workshop Back to basics 27 novembre 2013 Stefano Mizio
  • Steve Blank Stefano Mizio
  • Startup and established company Steve Blank Stefano Mizio
  • The Big Picture Business Model & Context The Market The Company Customer •Jobs to be done •Needs •Satisfaction Market Segments •Volume/Growth rate •Revenue potential Current Business Model The Big Picture Future Trends Technology Regulatory Macro-economic Society Culture The Industry Gaining insights Blue Ocean Framework •Unexploited Potential •Option Value •Value Curve •Buyer experience Future Business Model Stefano Mizio
  • What does business model mean? • “A business model is simply the ‘way of doing business’ that a firm has chosen: its entire system for creating and providing consistent value to customers and earning a profit from that activity, as well as benefit for its broader stakeholders. It refers to the core architecture or configuration of the firm, specifically how it deploys all relevant resources (not just those within the company boundaries), to create differentiated value for customers at a profit…” (Davenport, T. H., M. Leibold and S. Voelpel (2006). Strategic Management in the Innovation Economy. Publicis Wiley.) • The business model is a company’s answer to the question of how to make money in its chosen business. It describes, “…as a system, how the pieces of a business fit together” (Magretta, J. (2002). "Why Business Models Matter." Harvard Business Review 80(5) May: 86-92.) Stefano Mizio
  • What is a business model? • The essence and main components WHO WHAT HOW is your customer? do you offer your customers? do you do this? Markets Products & Services Create Value Customer Segments Solutions Deliver Value Individual Customers Experiences Capture Value Delivering the Who, What and How in a concise message. Unique Value Proposition: a single, clear compelling message that states why you are different and worth buying By Mark Sniukas Stefano Mizio
  • Business Model McDonald’s Who • People who want a quick bite to eat • Get in, order, get served quickly, get out quickly again What • Pre-made food prepared constantly according to demand • Standard menus • Some variations allowed How • Standardized processes • Central locations with high frequencies • The key is to serve a maximum number of people during a given time By Mark Sniukas Stefano Mizio
  • Your current business model Build a common language and understanding The business model is a company’s answer to the question of how to make money in its chosen business. It describes, “…as a system, how the pieces of a business fit together” KEY PARTNER KEY ACTIVITIES What are your main suppliers, partners and alliances? What are your core activities and processes? KEY RESOURCES What are your main assets and competencies? COST CENTRES OFFER RELATIONSHIPS What‘s your offer? What‘s your relationship to the customer? What‘s your image? Which „jobs to be done“ do you satisfy? CHANNELS How do you reach your customers? CLIENTS Who‘s your customer? Which customer segments do you serve? REVENUE STREAMS How do you make money? What is driving cost? By A. Osterlwalder Stefano Mizio
  • BMC Example: Telco Stefano Mizio
  • JTBD fundamental problem in a given situation that needs a solution When customers find that they need to get a job done, they “hire” products or services to do the job. MIT Sloan Management Review 2007 - Finding the Right Job For Your Product Stefano Mizio
  • JTBD fundamental problem in a given situation that needs a solution Main jobs to be done, which describe the task that customers want to achieve. Related jobs to be done, which customers want to accomplish in conjunction with the main jobs to be done. Key components of a job statement are an action verb, the object of the action, and clarification of the context in which the job is performed The Innovator’s toolkit Stefano Mizio
  • The Process 1 2 3 • Jobs to be done • Value proposition • Your Business Model Stefano Mizio
  • You are standing on a Mumbai road on a rainy day and notice the large number of motor scooters snaking precariously in and out around the cars JTBD: providing a safer alternative for scooter families. Value Proposition: offering an affordable, safer, all-weather alternative for scooter families. Business Model: that goal required radical changes in the cost structure of making a Car. Stefano Mizio
  • Value Proposition Canvas Goal: product-market fit Design Value Propositions that match your Customer's needs and jobs-to-be-done and helps them solve their problems By A. Osterlwalder . Stefano Mizio
  • Product-Market fit Gains: Jobs to be done: •Which savings would make your customer happy? •What outcomes does your customer expect and what would go beyond his/her expectations? •How do current solutions delight your customer? •What would make your customer’s job or life easier? •What positive social consequences does your customer desire? •What are customers looking for? •What do customers dream about? •How does your customer measure success and failure? •What would increase the likelihood of adopting a solution? Pains (before, during and •What functional jobs is your customer trying get done? (solve a specific problem, complete a specific ask) •What basic needs is your customer trying to satisfy? (communication,…) •What emotional jobs is your customer trying to get done? (feel good, security,…) after getting the JTBD): •What does your customer find too costly? •What makes your customer feel bad? •How are current solutions underperforming for your customer? •What are the main difficulties and challenges your customer encounters? •What negative social consequences does your customer encounter or fear? •What risks does your customer fear? •What common mistakes does your customer make? •What barriers are keeping your customer from adopting solutions? By A. Osterlwalder Stefano Mizio
  • Value Proposition Canvas (vitamins): How we provide benefits for our customers (for example: helping them to save some money thanks to some discount coupons). (analgesics): How we are helping our customers with their pains (for example: saving them some time thanks to the automatic generation of a shopping list or thanks to a home delivery service) Which core beliefs you need to test with customers By A. Osterlwalder Stefano Mizio
  • The Journey Andreas Klinger Stefano Mizio
  • Static and Dynamic merge WHAT are we building and WHY are we buiding it By A. Osterlwalder Stefano Mizio
  • There are no facts inside the building Lean Startup 101 Stefano Mizio
  • Leaps of faith assumptions The Value Hypothesis The Growth Hypothesis The Minimum Viable Product Stefano Mizio
  • DURATHON Data Center Telecom /Cell phones provider Unreliable electric grid +1 backup metod Sell Risk theft of fuel Fuel costs countries have grid problerms Data center fuel availability Developing countries / no reliable grid Exploration 7/10 www.leanstartupmachine.com Stefano Mizio
  • The easiest version… Stefano Mizio
  • Lean Launch Lab www.leanlaunchlab.com Stefano Mizio
  • BMC KEY PARTNERS KEY ACTIVITIES KEY RESOURCES COST CENTRES VALUE PROPOSITION RELATIONSHIPS CUSTOMERS CHANNELS REVENUE STREAMS Stefano Mizio
  • Strategy and Business Models (Business Models)… But they don’t factor in one critical dimension of performance: competition. Sooner or later—and it is usually sooner—every enterprise runs into competitors P.B. Seddon – G.P. Lewis Strategy and Business Models: what’s the difference? Stefano Mizio
  • Value Curve theory (1) W.C. Kim R. Mauborgne Blue Ocean Strategy Stefano Mizio
  • Value Curve theory (2) W.C. Kim R. Mauborgne Blue Ocean Strategy Stefano Mizio
  • Nintendo Wii example Industry Strategy Canvas 10 Scoring 8 6 4 2 0 Nintendo Factors of Competition W.C. Kim R. Mauborgne Blue Ocean Strategy Game Industry Stefano Mizio
  • Holistic Focus on three things Agile Coaching Blog – David Bland Stefano Mizio